Film

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John F. Kennedy had a dream of sending a white man, a black man and an Asian to the moon. Ed Dwight, a KCK native, came close to being the black man on that mission.

Inspired by the upcoming film, Hidden Figures, we hear his story. Plus, a chat with a molecular biologist and our film critics.

Guests:

Paramount Pictures

Many of us opt for a movie during the holiday weekend and Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics agree on all three of this week's recommendations.

Manchester by the Sea, R

  • A poignant drama starring Casey Affleck, who plays down-and-out janitor Lee. His life is changed when his brother dies and Lee takes over as guardian for his teenage nephew.

Jackie, R

Atlas Films

Sorry to remind you, but Christmas is next weekend and New Year's Day is the weekend after that! Your time to see the best films of 2016 is quickly running out. Get a start on the list by heading to your local cinema and checking out one (or a few) of this weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics.

First, Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics share their favorites of 2016. Then, they review movies now showing in area theaters, including La La Land, Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have HappenedManchester by the Sea, Nocturnal AnimalsMiss Sloane, The Eagle Huntress, Loving and Moonlight.

courtesy of the artist

The film La La Land opens nationwide on Friday, and it's already racking up award nominations including seven Golden Globes. The musical stars Emma Stone as an actress and Ryan Gosling as a jazz musician. Both are struggling to make ends meet in Los Angeles, California. 

Amazon Studios

Mother Nature spoiled us with a warm November, but Old Man Winter is making us pay this week! Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have suggestions on what to watch that will make you brave the cold winds to reach the comfort of a movie theater. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

  • The story of a young black man struggling to find and accept himself while growing up in a rough neighborhood in Miami.

Manchester by the Sea, R

Sony Picture Classics

This time of the year can be heavy with tradition, but don't let yourself get stuck in the past. This weekend, Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics are endorsing several movies that could embolden you to break from the familiar and find your own way in life. During the holiday shopping frenzy, make time to be inspired. Stop by your local theater for a flick with a friend.

Cynthia Haines

Eagle Huntress, G

Focus Features

Looking for a way to reward yourself for getting out there and snagging some great deals on Black Friday, or  just wanting to avoid the crush of shoppers altogether?  Then get to an area theater and see one (or more) of the movies recommended by Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

A check-in with Aubrey Paine, whose second grade class in the Hickman Mills School District has changed a lot since the start of the school year: only seven of the original 18 students are there.

Plus, we remember the life of Tom Poe: activist, minister, UMKC professor and a KCUR film critic.

Guests:

Courtesy Tom Poe/Facebook

“If you’re going to sin,” the former Methodist minister Tom Poe once told me, “sin boldly.”

He was using the words of theologian Martin Luther to justify some sort of subversiveness (I can't remember what we were up to) but I’ll forever quote Poe on that one.

Moho Film and Yong Film

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Whether you're looking for a break from grocery shopping, baking, or ornery relatives, Up To Date has the solution; our indie, foreign and documentary film critics are back with movie recommendations for the weekend. Check them out while they're still showing on area screens.

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

When Anthony Ladesich found his father's youthful correspondence with an old Navy friend on a stack of reel-to-reel tapes, he also found so much more: a portal into Kansas City's jazz history, and a way of keeping his dad with him a little longer.

Plus, for the first time ever, a student was admitted to UMKC Conservatory's composition program using the computer as his instrument.

This is an encore edition of Central Standard.

Guests:

A24 Films

It has been a long week for a lot of reasons. If you are looking for a little respite and relief, check out this weekend's recommendations from the Up To Date indie, foreign and documentary film critics before they are no longer available on area big-screens. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

  • The story of a young black man struggling to find, and accept, himself while growing up in a rough neighborhood in Miami.

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

Byron Newman / Amazon Studios / Magnolia Pictures

No one will blame you for tuning out the presidential campaign and looking for a way to avoid election stress disorder while waiting for November 8th to blow over. In fact, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics' latest recommendations are essentially a prescription for a weekend full of music, movies and popcorn.

First, a conversation with the co-hosts of Alien Minute, a podcast that takes a minute-by-minute look at the 1979 science-fiction/horror classic, Alien. Then, former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins talks about his latest collection of poetry, The Rain in Portugal.

First, we get a rundown of what audiences can look forward to at next weekend's Kansas International Film Festival. Then, Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters, including Certain Women, Michael Moore in Trumpland, Denial, A Man Called Ove, American Honey, The Birth of a Nation, and In a Valley of Violence.

Laurie Sparham

Ghosts and ghouls haunting your mood, or is it just candy that's giving you a stomach ache? Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have you covered either way. You can avoid the Halloween frights by dimming the lights and catching a not-so-spooky movie. This weekend's recommendations are guaranteed to be completely free of witches and warlocks.

Cynthia Haines

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Don't ask Todd Sheets about the first horror film that he made.

"It's godawful," he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard. "Anything I made before '93 I kind of disowned."

Sheets started making horror movies in the late 1980s in Kansas City. He quickly earned a cult following; he was even dubbed the "Prince of Gore."

Todd Sheets started making horror movies in KC in the late 1980s. He stopped after a close friend died at the Catacombs Haunted House. A health scare — a heart attack and quadruple bypass surgery — inspired him, in part, to make movies again. His latest, Dreaming Purple Neon, has its world premiere tomorrow night at Screenland Armour.

Plus, a chat with musician Rachel Mallin, and an encore presentation on lizards.

Guests:

Courtesy Wide Awake Films

The Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham is already famous enough to have his work in the National Gallery of Art, as well as many other esteemed institutions. But to his hometown of Arrow Rock, population 56, he could stand to be more famous.

As sous chef at Café Sebastienne, Janet Ross prepares ruby trout with a root vegetable hash. As a contestant on Cutthroat Kitchen: Tournament of Terror, she uses murder weapons to prepare Halloween-themed meals like liver and brains. How does she transition between the two? 

In a time of diminishing budgets, guest host Brian Ellison learns how fine-arts program Harmony Project is helping underserved kids in Kansas City do better in school. Then, actor Bryan Cranston says a large part of his successful career has to do with hard work and good luck. This week's Local Listen features the classic rock band Kansas, touring in support of its first album since 2000.

This week, Kansas Citians have an opportunity to see an extraordinary film that’s been publicly screened fewer than a dozen times since its original release in 1920. For decades, film historians figured it was lost.

The film's journey to Kansas City started back in 2004, when Brian Hearn was the film curator of the Oklahoma City Museum and received a strange call from a private investigator in North Carolina.

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