Emory Maiden / Flickr--CC

Shawnee Mission School District Says It's Crippled By School Funding System

You might be surprised to hear it, but the Shawnee Mission School District (SMSD) says it's in a funding crisis that has had a "crippling" effect on everything from class size to property values in the district. The surprising admission comes in a friend-of-the- court brief the district filed with the Kansas Supreme Court in the pending school finance case. "The Kansas school finance system's underfunding, coupled with the Spending Cap, results in a significant detriment to districts like...
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Robert Reich On The Trans-Pacific Partnership And 'Saving Capitalism'

Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich has spent a lifetime thinking about all manner of economic questions. His latest book asks: Is the free market really free?

Central Standard

Home And The Range

Making decisions about food based on concern for the environment. Is there a way to eat sustainably in Kansas City?

Kenneth Hagemeyer / Flickr-CC

6 Revolutionary Things To Do This Weekend In Kansas City

As the Beatles posited in their pithy ditty, “Revolution”: “You say you want a revolution/Well, you know, we all want to change the world.” Despite such lyrical caginess, John, Paul, George and Ringo couldn’t help but shake things up for all the world to see. That’s what revolutionaries do. This weekend, the malleable ’60s mop-tops and other ground-breakers will be given their revolutionary due. Take to the streets! No, you can’t bring a torch. Nice try, though. 1. The Fab Four: The Ultimate...
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Jeremy Bernfeld / KCUR

After finding themselves in an early hole, the Royals rallied Friday night to take Game 2 of the American League Division Series and knot the best-of-five game series at one.

The win was a crucial victory for Kansas City, which risked traveling to Houston to face the Astros’ ace starting pitcher while staring at elimination. Now, it’s a race to two wins to move on to the American League Championship series.

First-baseman Eric Hosmer said the win would give the team some confidence.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr-CC

Catholic Charities of Northeastern Kansas is serving significantly more residents at its food pantries than in previous years.

The organization served nearly 175,000 individuals in need of food over the last 12 months. That's a 25 percent increase over the previous year.

"The economy has picked up, but a lot of people who have gotten jobs are working jobs that (pay) low wages," says Kim Brabits, the organization's vice president of program operations. "Although they're no longer unemployed, they're still (sometimes) living below 200 percent of the poverty level."

Frank Morris / KCUR

When Google Inc. selected Kansas City, Kansas, as the first recipient of its ultra-fast Internet network, the news made headlines around the country.

Yet Kansas City wasn't the first to have gigabit service. In fact, we were years behind. Before Google even announced its contest for the first city to get Google Fiber, Chattanooga, Tennessee, already had deployed its own fiber optic network.

We built it ... but will they come?

AFGE / Flickr--CC

For the past seven years, Randi Weingarten has led the American Federation of Teachers, one of the largest teachers' unions in the United States. 

In an interview with KCUR, she discussed what may be behind the persistent teacher shortages in Kansas, the politically tinged process to rewrite Missouri's learning standards and a case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court that could forever alter how unions like hers do business. 

Rough Tough, Real Stuff / Flickr--CC


The University of Kansas has received an $8.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help low-income and first-generation students finish college.

KU is just one of 11 universities that are part of the grant, aimed at increasing college retention.

The money will be used for research.

“The end game is to ensure the students by the end of the study, are on track to complete a degree in four years," says Randall Brumfield, director of KU’s undergraduate advising center. 

Dave Ranney / Heartland Health Monitor

A recent change in Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services policy will reduce access to services that help the state’s frail elders avoid often-costly nursing home stays, according to directors of the state’s Area Agencies on Aging.

“This will have an impact on case management services, which we believe are pivotal when it comes to helping our customers remain in their homes,” says Janis DeBoer, executive director of the Kansas Area Agencies on Aging Association. “Case management is the glue that keeps everything together.”

A new statistical summary by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment shows progress in reducing a long-standing health disparity between black and white Kansans: the death rate for babies in their first year of life.


  MU Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced Thursday that the University of Missouri will soon require faculty and new students to go through diversity and inclusion training.

His announcement came following an incident of racism that occurred during the early hours of the morning on October 5. The Legion of Black Collegians homecoming royalty court was practicing a performance at Traditions Plaza when a racial slur was yelled at them.

Backers of medical marijuana want Missourians to decide if doctors can be allowed to prescribe the drug to critically ill patients.

Two ballot initiatives that would do just that were filed on Thursday.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has agreed to issue birth certificates for two same-sex couples.

In both cases, the women had children through artificial insemination.

Kansas law says a married couple can both be listed on the birth certificate for a child born through artificial insemination, but the department initially declined to list two women as the parents. 

Attorney David Brown represents a Lawrence couple in a lawsuit over the issue. 



What's for dinner?

Dinner. Whether you love it or hate that it keeps coming around every night — we want to know what's on your plate or in your takeout container.