urban community

KIPP KC

KIPP KC has rented space in the old Metropolitan Community College Pioneer Campus building at 18th and Prospect Avenue in Kansas City for eight years. Now, the charter middle school has bought the entire 95,000-square foot property as it embarks on a larger expansion plan. 

The school offers grades 5-8 and will add classes in kindergarten through fourth grade next year. School officials anticipate adding these grades will boost enrollment by more than 100 students, to around 380 total.

Curve Ball

May 23, 2016
Greg Echlin / KCUR

A swanky new baseball facility in the 18th and Vine district, sponsored by Major League Baseball, raises big questions: Are black kids still playing baseball? Are sports a "way out" for youth? Will the coaches come from the surrounding neighborhood? And what about the kids?

Guests:

BlueGold73 / Wikipedia

TIF (tax increment financing) is a major tool for encouraging development in blighted areas within the city. As neighborhoods transform and start to thrive, many question whether tax incentives are still necessary to lure new businesses. So what's the future of TIF, and is there a part of town that should benefit from a next round of TIF funding?

Guests:

Alex Smith / Heartland Health Monitor

With Wyandotte County struggling to address a shortage of primary care physicians, a discussion exploring how that shortage affects doctors, patients and the health of our communities. Plus, what does it mean to be healthy, anyway?

Guests:

Roger Coleman's new book begins with a curse on Kansas City. It's the dreaded curse of dullness. Coleman spent 42 years as a minister in midtown, Kansas City and started writing five years ago when he saw the city becoming younger, more vibrant and more open. He wanted to document that shift. His protagonist is a boy whose mission is to lift the curse of dullness. His journey takes him all over town.

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Recently, a local author wrote a blog post, "Onward, Christian Gentry," which questioned how Christians — mainly white, evangelical Christians — approach living in the urban core. What role does faith play in developing urban communities in Kansas City? 

The combination of bored kids with lots of free time in the summer can be a challenge for parents, especially those living in the urban core where resources are stretched and choices are often limited. On this edition of Up To Date, guest host Danie Alexander discusses summer programs for inner city youth in Kansas City.

Guests:

For decades, Troost Avenue has symbolized racial separation, income disparity and vast differences in home value as well as frequency of crime. But it's only a street. And at one time, it happened to be quite a prosperous street.

Hosted by Monroe Dodd, this discussion explores the specific decisions, both national and local, that laid the groundwork for Troost's transformation into a major metropolitan divide. Personal stories from a longtime resident contribute to this conversation.  

Guests:

sphinxmusic.org

The Musical Bridges program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music aims to give more arts opportunities to young people in the urban core of the city.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with a MacArthur Fellow who's done a similar thing in Detroit.

Guests:

Second Baptist Church

One hundred fifty years ago the country was midway through the Civil War, and back then, Second Baptist Church was a mission known as a "Stragglers Camp" located on the south banks of the Missouri River.

These days, the church at 3620 E. 39th Street is reaching out to deal with crime and a high unemployment rate, and it's about to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington.

The senior pastors of Second Baptist have enjoyed long tenures.Over the last 150 years, the church has been led by just eight head preachers.

Conference with the Urban Summit

Jan 3, 2012
flickr/Pam's Pics-

On Wednesday’s Central Standard, we’re previewing the next Urban Summit, a meeting of minds that addresses the needs and concerns of the urban core.

Poverty on the Rise in Johnson County

Dec 8, 2010

The Johnson County Christmas Bureau, has opened its doors to their annual Holiday Shop at the Great Mall of the Great Plains in Olathe, KS. This is their 50th year creating a shopping experience for low income families around the holidays.

Director Barb McNeil says that “Poverty” and “Johnson County” aren’t words often heard in the same sentence, they should be. Though the population in Johnson County grew by 2% last year, the number of families below the poverty line grew by 64%.