University of Kansas

Kyle Palmer / KCUR 89.3

The wall outside the college counseling classroom at Kansas City's University Academy is adorned with dozens of college acceptance letters. Several of them are addressed to Jazmyne Smith. 

"Well, I’ve been accepted at KU, K-State, Missouri S&T, Coe College," Smith says, a smile playing across her face. "And I’m still waiting to hear back from some other places: Duke, Penn, Stanford. You know, shooting for the stars."

rolandojones / Flickr-CC

This story was updated at 1:58 p.m. to include the comments of a KU spokeswoman.

A second University of Kansas student has sued the university after she says she was sexually assaulted by the same football player who allegedly raped a former student who sued KU last month.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3FM

Sixth-grader Miguel Gonzales sits at a grand piano at Eisenhower Middle School in Kansas City, Kansas. He’s in a large room reserved for special events.

Under a mop of auburn hair, Gonzales smiles shyly as he waits for his lesson to begin. His instructor Paul Adams (that’s Mr. Adams to Gonzales) soon shows up — on the screen of a laptop. Adams, a graduate student in piano at the University of Kansas, is about 35 miles away in a music studio on the Lawrence campus. 

Native Americans from across the continent will congregate in Lawrence this weekend to sing, dance and honor First Nations culture. We learn about the functions and features of a powwow, and what to expect at this year's cultural and competitive event.

Guests:

anthonynlee / YouTube

Would you wire your head to a battery if you thought it might help boost your brain function?

A quick Internet search turns up lots of videos of at-home tinkerers with electrodes strapped to their heads and nervous looks on their faces.

Courtesy Rebekah Winegarner

After seven hours of sitting at a computer creating a submission for Roland’s Digital Piano Design Contest, Rebekah Winegarner needed some fun. Clicking through the material menu on her industrial design software, she changed her wooden piano, shaped like a rock formation from the Utah desert, to the color of beer.

The Student Senate at the University of Kansas cut funding for the University Daily Kansan in half for the 2015-2016 school year after the newspaper published an editorial critical of the governing body. Now, the student newspaper at KU is suing the university for violating its First Amendment rights.

Guests:

The University of Kansas is taking a bold step into the fight against cybercrime. It recently announced a $4.7 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to train a new generation of cyberdefense experts who will be dedicated to public service.

Guest:

  • Bo Luo is an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at KU and the program leader of CyberCorps.

University of Kansas film professor Kevin Willmott's latest movie, CHI-RAQ has opened to lots of buzz. Steve Kraske and the film critics talk to the screenwriter about what he and co-writer Spike Lee were trying to say in this film. 

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Leaders of the Student Senate at the University of Kansas made the case to keep their jobs Wednesday night, but the impeachment process is now underway.

The turmoil is in response to claims of racism and discrimination at KU. The Executive Committee of the Senate called for the president, vice president and chief of staff to resign or face possible impeachment.

Student Body President Jessie Pringle told the Senate that she would stay in her post.

In the entire history of the natural world -- that's hundreds of millions of years -- only four groups of animals have developed the ability to lift up off the ground and fly. A KU professor has been piecing together that story.

Guest:

Jane McQueeny, Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity & Access (IOA) at the University of Kansas, has resigned.

McQueeny has been the face of the university’s response to an increase in the number of sexual assault and discrimination complaints under the federal Title IX law. The increase does not necessarily mean an increase in the incidence of cases, but an increase in reporting. In the past, McQueeny has said higher numbers of complaints is a good thing because it means more people are coming forward.

“Jane was first person to head the newly-created Title IX office in 2012,” said Erin Barcomb-Peterson, with the KU Office of Public Affairs. “She spearheaded the role of the university’s response to sex discrimination complaints.”

Rough Tough, Real Stuff / Flickr--CC

 

The University of Kansas has received an $8.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help low-income and first-generation students finish college.

KU is just one of 11 universities that are part of the grant, aimed at increasing college retention.

The money will be used for research.

“The end game is to ensure the students by the end of the study, are on track to complete a degree in four years," says Randall Brumfield, director of KU’s undergraduate advising center. 

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

There was some potentially great news for students at Missouri universities and community colleges Monday.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says he’s reached a deal with higher education officials in the state to freeze tuition for next year.

Nixon says he is recommending $55 million more in performance funding for higher education next fiscal year. That's a 6 percent increase and would bring total state higher education funding to $985 million next fiscal year.

Of course, the General Assembly and college boards must approve the plan.

Courtesy photo / Kansas State University

Critics say the Kansas State University marching band put a Kansas Jayhawk in a compromised position during halftime of the Wildcats' season opener Saturday. (Decide for yourself here.)

The band performed a 'space'-themed show and at one point began playing music from Star Trek. One half of the band formed what looked like a Jayhawk; the other half formed what any Trekkie would recognize as the Starship Enterprise. Then, the two formations started coming towards each other, causing the uproar.

Should universities police student behavior on social media? Recently, a KU student was expelled for comments he made about an ex-girlfriend on Twitter. A reporter and a student discuss the case and whether social media is part of a school's learning environment.

courtesy: University of Kansas

More than 50 University of Kansas students, faculty and staff collaborated – over four semesters – to create a public sculpture project. The commissioned art, completed in mid-November, marked the 100th anniversary of the Federal Reserve System.

According to associate professor of art Matthew Burke, the team sifted through a collection of employee memorabilia, such as pens, stamps, and nameplates. 

Courtesy photo / Kari Deude

For more than 100 years, the University of Kansas Jayhawks and the University of Missouri Tigers have been embroiled in a bitter rivalry.

It's a rivalry that's alive and well, even though the teams haven't played each other in two years.

RELATEDJayhawks and Tigers Love to Hate Each Other Across State Line

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR

There was no shortage of Mizzou hate Dec. 13  when the University of Kansas played the University of Utah at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo.

Thousands of Kansas fans gathered, ironically in Missouri, to watch the Jayhawks play.

Kansas and Missouri haven’t played one another since 2012, when Missouri left the Big 12 Conference for the Southeastern Conference.

But just mention the University of Missouri to a die-hard Jayhawk and you’ll get a heated response. To fans, it’s more than just a sports rivalry. It's part of their identities.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

The Kansas City metropolitan area is almost equally divided geographically and population-wise between two states —Missouri and Kansas.

But how does this state-divide define us as individuals within the community?

Courtesy of Lindsey Roesti

University of Kansas theater professor Peter Zazzali wanted to challenge his students. So, heading into Thanksgiving, they're putting on a play called “The Big Meal.”

BBC

They've been called fish fireworks, and their glowing displays are like nighttime light shows on the water. Ostracods are a very old species of crustacean with a trait called bioluminescence. That's a fancy way of saying they light up, like fireflies. But unlike fireflies, ostracods have extracellular bioluminescence. They shoot light out of their bodies and into the water. The behavior is part mating ritual, part defense mechanism.

Tristan Bowersox / Flickr, Creative Commons

California just passed a law establishing "yes means yes" as the statewide standard for consent, and President Obama recently issued a message to the nation calling assault on campus "an affront to our basic humanity." In the wake of some controversial local cases, where do local universities stand on this issue, and what are students saying?

Guests:

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Concerns about the way the University of Kansas handles sexual assault cases have been boiling over in recent weeks.

Reports of alleged sexual assaults garnering minor punishments have prompted protests and even a video produced by students telling others not to attend KU. Thursday night, university officials held a panel discussion where they answered questions, took suggestions and explained university policies surrounding sexual assault.

More than 100 people gathered for the discussion. Those who spoke expressed concerns about the process and suggested improvements.

James Hill / Creative Commons, Flickr

    

Languages change. Sometimes slowly and organically, sometimes quickly... and on purpose.

Kazakh President Nursaltan Nazarbayev wants the people of Kazakhstan to use Latin script (rather than Cyrillic) to write in their native language.

Jonnybsay / Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this month the University of Kansas athletics department announced that Section U, a 120-seat area of Allen Fieldhouse previously reserved for students, would be reallocated to donor seating. The decision was a direct response to an attempt by the Student Senate to cut the mandatory athletics fee charged to all KU students.

On Thursday's, Up to Date, we talk with student reporter Ben Carroll for a look at the timeline of events leading up to the decision and how it's being perceived by Jayhawk fans.

The Kansas Board of Regents will consider proposed tuition increases at a meeting this week. Breeze Richardson with the board, says this will be the final step in the process. Universities have spent the last few months developing and submitting their proposals.

"Those proposals were brought forth at last months meeting, and then the final proposals will be presented [Wedesnday] and voted upon" Richardson said.

Wikimedia / CC

Construction begins Friday on the DeBruce Center, a three-story building that will house the original rules for basketball, typed up by the game’s inventor, James Naismith, in 1892.

 The DeBruce Center will be connected to Allen Fieldhouse by a second-story walkway.

University of Kansas associate athletics director Jim Marchiony says the rules will be part of a display that tells the story of the sport of basketball and KU’s connection to it.

Courtesy: KU Athletics

University of Kansas freshman Andrew Wiggins announced Monday he’s declaring for the NBA draft.

The 6' 8'' player was the top high school recruit in 2013 - and this season Wiggins scored 597 points, more than any freshman in KU's history, including a high of 29 points in one game.

The draft takes place in June – and Wiggins is expected to be a first-round draft selection, if not the first. He says that’s where he wants to be.

Alex Smith / KCUR

At the University of Kansas, some chemical engineers study petroleum, others work on solvents. Then there’s Professor Stevin Gehrke. He casts his scientific lens downward, looking for the future of medicine in things that scurry underfoot.

“What’s different about a bug that goes ‘squish’ when you step on it and a bug that goes ‘crunch’ when you step on it?” Gehrke describes his work.

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