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During World War II, the Hollywood Canteen in Los Angeles was a famous nightclub where civilian hostesses danced with Allied soldiers of all races. It was an oasis during a time of segregation — or was it? KU professor Sherrie Tucker interviewed people who frequented the club and heard about their different — and sometimes contradictory — experiences on the dance floor.


University of Missouri-Kansas City

Missouri’s medical schools on Friday kicked off a collaborative effort to encourage minorities to enter the health care professions.

Former U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan, who served under President George H.W. Bush from 1989 to 1993, helped launch the project, delivering a lecture Friday at the University of Missouri-Kansas City on the state of diversity in the health care workforce since 1965.

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This spring marked the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, a Kansas case that went to the Supreme Court and ultimately ended with the ruling that the segregation of schools was unconstitutional. In the first half of Tuesday's Central Standard, we shared some little-known stories of the desegregation process from the months and years that followed.

James C. Cassatt

Looking back, desegregating the military seems like the obvious thing to do, but in the 1940s and 50s, it wasn't so clear for Harry Truman.

Kansas City, MO – For decades, Kansas City has been known as a city sharply segregated by race, most dramatically along Troost Avenue. But new data suggests that's changing, at least among blacks and whites.

The 2000 census showed that Kansas City was the 16th most segregated major city in the US, but new estimates from the US Census Bureau's American Community Survey indicate that we've dropped to 28th.