salmonella

Photo courtesy Hostess Brands

Kansas City-based Hostess Brands is voluntarily recalling its Holiday White Peppermint Hostess Twinkies due to a concern about possible salmonella contamination.

Although no illnesses have been reported and none of the affected products have tested positive for salmonella, Hostess says it’s initiating the recall “out of an abundance of caution.”

The confectionary coating used on the Twinkies was previously recalled by its maker, Valley Milk Products, prompting Hostess’ recall. No other Hostess products are affected by the recall.

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Susanne Byerly can laugh now, four years later, talking about how she and her husband were trying to eat healthy food when they bought ground turkey for their spaghetti dinner.

Byerly, along with her husband, Jerry, and their two-year-old, Jack, were on vacation with extended family in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. While buying supplies at a local grocery store, they decided to swap ground beef for poultry because they were watching their weight.

Just how risky is eating poultry? On this edition of Up to Date, we look at salmonella contamination in poultry processing and the health risks to consumers.

Guests:

  • David E. Hoffman is the correspondent for Frontline's The Trouble with Chicken. He is also a Pulitzer Prize winner and a contributing editor at The Washington Post.
  • Peggy Lowe is the investigative editor for KCUR and Harvest Public Media that follows agricultural issues in the Midwest.

USDA / Flickr--CC

Susanne Byerly can laugh now, four years later, talking about how she and her husband were trying to eat healthy food when they bought ground turkey for their spaghetti dinner.

Byerly, along with her husband, Jerry, and their two-year-old, Jack, were on vacation with extended family in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. While buying supplies at a local grocery store, they decided to swap ground beef for poultry because they were watching their weight.

Lenexa,Kansas – Congressional hearings on the salmonella outbreak will take place next week in Washington.

The goal- to try and understand what happened to cause the recent recall of almost half a billion eggs, and subsequent illness of hundreds of people. Congress will further look at ways to prevent an outbreak from happening in the future.

Members of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee will hear from victims of salmonella, as well as poultry producers.

Kansas City, Mo –