Royals

Courtesy / Kansas City Chiefs

Wow. That was some game against the Patriots, huh? Twenty-seven to nothing at halftime. Tom Brady benched with nearly a whole quarter left. And how about Jamaal Charles?

Adam / Flickr--CC

For years, the Kansas City Chiefs dominated the hearts of local sports fans.

But we wanted to know how the Kansas City Royals’ recent World Series win and national attention changed the conversation, even as the Chiefs flirted with a chance at the Super Bowl.

When we asked Kansas Citians to draw a line in the sand and answer, “Is Kansas City a football or baseball town?” we suspect a little bit of “Midwestern nice” took over.  

It's been an amazing year for KC sports fans. The Royals won the World Series, and the Chiefs made the playoffs for the first time since 1993.

Is Kansas City a football town or a baseball town? Is the spirit of KC more deeply connected with baseball or football ... or something else?

Guests:

KCUR 89.3

 

Recent success from the Kansas City Chiefs and Kansas City Royals begs the question local sports fans have been waiting to answer their whole lives.

Tell KCUR: Is Kansas City a football or baseball town? Why?

Kansas Citians rallied for the Royals in 2015 when they won the World Series. And in 2016, the Chiefs flirted with the Super Bowl.

So, tell us, would you paint our town red — or blue? And don't forget to explain yourself.

Courtesy Kathleen Kunkler

Alex Gordon has called Kansas City home for every season he's been in the MLB, and it looks like the 32-year-old may spend the rest of his career here.

Gordon, a four-time Gold Glove recipient, has signed to a four-year, $72 million contract with the Royals.

Gordon helped the Royals win the World Series in 2015 as a left fielder and with crucial at bats, including a solo home run that led to a 1-0 series lead versus the New York Mets.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

The Missouri Development Finance Board has awarded $4 million in tax credits to the Kansas City MLB Urban Youth Academy.

The baseball park could open as early as next fall near 18th and Vine near the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum.

It’s expected the city will be able to leverage $8 million in donations with the credits, which will go to donors who contribute at least $5,000 to the Academy.

Beth Lipoff / KCUR 89.3

He’s played with the likes of Kansas City-great Count Basie, though he’s best known for leading The Tonight Show band when Johnny Carson was hosting. 

Doc Severinsen is back in Kansas City for a holiday performance with the Kansas City Symphony and chorus this weekend.

He spoke with Steve Kraske on Up To Date earlier this week, where they talked about his early career and his time with The Tonight Show

But Severinsen wasn’t quite finished at the end of the interview. 

After his appearance on Up To Date, Severinsen wanted to stick around to talk about one of our favorite subjects — Kansas City. 

After his appearance on Up To Date, former Tonight Show band leader Doc Severinsen wanted to stick around to talk about one of our favorite subjects — Kansas City. Hear him rave about our music scene, our sports teams and the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. 

Jeremy Bernfield / KCUR

The year is winding down, and if this wasn’t already one of the greatest years in local sports history, here come the re-energized Kansas City Chiefs. The Royals took the crown, but as commentator Victor Wishna explains in the latest edition of A Fan’s Notes, this might really be “our time.”

So. how ’bout them Chiefs? No, really — if you'd asked a month or so ago, most would’ve said, “Uh…what about ’em?”

Courtesy Kathleen Kunkler

It’s been nearly two weeks since the Kansas City Royals claimed their first World Series title in 30 years. Yet the glory hasn’t faded, and fans like commentator Victor Wishna are proudly still basking in it—while also peeking toward the future. Here’s Victor with this championship edition of “A Fan’s Notes.”

After that final moment that we’d anticipated for so long…

“Strike three called! It’s over! They’ve done it. The Royals are World Series champions!”

After it was over...

After the last strike, the final out…

Jason Wickersheim / Two West Advertising, twowest.com

There’s no doubt about it.

Tons of people went to the Royals World Series victory parade and rally. The city is estimating 800,000 people.

Kyle Palmer / KCUR

Few will argue against the notion that the Royals' recent run to a World Series title has been a good thing for Kansas City. The New York Times is lauding the metro's "resurgence" and newfound "swagger." Deadspin is fawning over the record-breaking turnout at Tuesday's victory parade. 

He predicted that the Royals would win the 2015 World Series ...  in 2011. We talk with Joe Posnanski about the team "that loves to be on the brink," his prognosticating skills and how he writes for his mother.

Guest:

Hundreds of thousands of Kansas City Royals fans lined the parade route and gathered at Union Station to celebrate the World Series championship.

As loud as Kauffman Stadium gets when Kansas City Royals fans make their voices heard, never before has it sounded like this amphitheater around Union Station when the fans chanted, “Let’s go Royals!”

The player fans wanted to hear from the most was the World Series Most Valuable Player Salvador Perez. “Today we are No. 1 in the whole world, guys,” said Perez.

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

Besides the biggest celebration ever in Kansas City history, there also was an election on Tuesday.

Voters were deciding a couple of open Missouri statehouse seats, capital improvement taxes in Independence and Oak Grove, and a school board seat in Kansas City Public Schools.

At lunch time, a polling place in Brookside was completely empty, except for the poll workers. Some voters came in early, every single one with a Royals shirt on.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR

Blue-clad and buzzing with 30 years' worth of pent up anticipation, Royals' fans began gathering in downtown Kansas City hours before the official start of Tuesday's World Series victory parade. 

Though they were here to cheer on the team that brought their city its first World Series title since the Reagan era, they also clearly drew a deeper meaning from the experience.

City of Kansas City, Missouri

Update, 4:10 pm. Kansas City Public Schools have now announced they will in fact be closed tomorrow. The administration had previously announced schools would be open.

Almost all metro schools will be closed Tuesday because of the Royals victory parade starting at noon.

The districts say they were more worried about absent teachers rather than absent students.

For many school districts, and many private schools, the lack of staff was one of the main reasons they are closing.

The Kansas City Royals became World Series champions last night and their hometown is buzzing with excitement. Up To Date retraces the team's incredible journey and hears from fans around the city.

Guests:

City of Kansas City

It's been a long 30 years since the Royals last earned the title "World Champions," but Sunday's 7-2 victory over the New York Mets has put Kansas City back in the winning mood.

To keep the good vibes flowing, the city has decided to hold a parade and celebration Tuesday to honor the boys in blue. Since it's been a generation since the last local World Series parade, we decided it might help to give Kansas Citians a quick primer on the ins and outs of the party.

Frank Morris / KCUR

The morning after the Royals take the crown in the 2015 World Series, KCUR listeners tell us what this moment means to them. Plus, what fireworks have to do with the Kansas City-style of celebration.

Guests:

  • Frank Morris, national correspondent and senior editor, KCUR
Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

If you went to bed Sunday night thinking the Royals would return to Kansas City to finish off the World Series this week, by now you know you were dead wrong.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Late Sunday afternoon the Port Authority of Kansas City put out a Tweet and a Facebook post. They were going to have a party.

The authority and the Friends of the River KC put up a 26-foot screen, brought in some food trucks and created a brand new place for Royals fans to watch the World Series.

About 1,500 Royals faithful gathered at a park by the Missouri River just north of downtown.

Cody Newill / KCUR

A generation’s worth of Kansas City hopes and prayers and pleading was finally answered Sunday night in New York. The Kansas City Royals are World Series champions.

It took 30 years for the Royals to once again reach the top of the baseball mountain. Thirty years of Opening Days pregnant with promise. Thirty years of long, hot summers drifting aimlessly toward autumn.

Thirty years of disappointment turned in a flash to shock, and quickly on to joy, when in the twelfth the Royals took the championship 7-2 after a turn in the ninth when the Mets left in their starting pitcher, Matt Harvey, with more than 110 pitches.

The Kansas City Royals defeated the New York Mets, 5-3, to move closer to winning a World Series championship with a three games to one lead.

The Royals rallied late to take the lead and turned to their closer, Wade Davis. Davis protected the lead with a six-out save in the eighth and ninth innings.

Davis says it was something he knew he could do, especially in the World Series. "A couple more outs really doesn’t change anything," says Davis.

The Royals and Mets will play Game Five on Sunday night in New York. 

Cody Newill / KCUR

Baseball is a notoriously superstitious sport for both players and fans. The superstition is so powerful that it has led two Royals fanatics to make a portable shrine to keep the boys in blue lucky during their battle for the World Series against the New York Mets.

Valdez Campos and Jon Watkins both love the Royals and they both work at Blvd. Tavern. One slow Sunday night at the bar, they got to thinking about how they could honor the team and create a good luck charm to see them through the Series.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Around Kansas City, spontaneous acts of decoration in hues of royal blue are surfacing in unexpected places. As a result, historic statues are becoming pop-up shrines to the Kansas City Royals. 

Museum staff at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum placed a Kansas City Royals baseball cap on the life-size bronze statue of Truman in the Legacy Gallery. A photograph of the smiling statue can be found on the museum’s Facebook page

Karen Eisenbraun / Twitter

If you've watched the World Series at all this year (and if you live in Kansas City there is a very good chance you have, according to FOX's TV ratings) then you know 'Fur Hat Lady.' She's this year's 'Marlins Man.' 

There she is, peeking over the shoulder of right-handed batters and boring her sunglass-gaze into your deeper conscious. 

 

Minda Haas / Flickr -- CC

When Kansas City Royals outfielder Paulo Orlando replaced Alex Rios as a late-inning defensive change last Tuesday, he made history. Orlando became the first native of Brazil to play in the World Series.

The next challenge is for Orlando, and the sport of baseball, to gain more notoriety in Brazil.

You may have seen it on social media: The could-it-be-true-maybe-not? tidbits about various Royals players with the hashtag "Friendly Royals Facts." But really, who are these guys? KCUR's sports reporter tells us about the personal lives of Salvy, LoCain and more.

Guest:

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Most Kansas Citians already knew it’s hard not to love the Kansas City Royals, but even die-hard Mets fans can’t help but like the boys in blue.

Cody Rogers drove 21 hours from Catskill, New York, to get to Kansas, where he's been working for the summer in the wind turbine industry.

A Mets fan, he was at Game 1 of the World Series at Kauffman Stadium. “The Mets mean everything to me,” says Rogers. 

Pages