recycling

The holidays are approaching, and some of us will be frantically cleaning our homes — and getting rid of clutter — in preparation for guests. Or we'll be visiting parents and relatives, where we might confront the stuff from years past.

On this show, we take a closer look at clutter. It's bad and we should get rid of the things that don't bring us joy, right? Maybe not...

Guests:

If you’ve recently driven through Kansas City’s Marlborough neighborhood, which borders from Troost Avenue on the west, Prospect Avenue on the east, and from E. 79th Street to E. 85th Street, you may have noticed that the streets are a little cleaner these days.

That's thanks to Kansas City’s pilot Trash Cart Program, a green infrastructure project where residents are given new covered garbage and recycling bins.

The program rolled out last April in Kansas City’s Marlborough neighborhood as part of the city’s development of green infrastructure projects.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

On average, each person in Kansas City throws away seven pounds of garbage every day, and, it turns out, 80% of that garbage is actually recyclable.

We check in on Kansas City's recycling program, revisit the easy steps, and hear how our city could be doing better.

Guests:

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City's curbside recycling program started in 2004. Since then, our diversion rates, as in the measurement of how much trash we are keeping from the landfills has stayed consistently around the in the 25-30 percent range. The goal is to reach an 80 percent diversion rate by 2020. We're a ways off, but regional experts remain optimistic. 

"We are recycling much more than the numbers show," says Marleen Leonce.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

The little black dress was sleeveless, with a sequined neckline, and perfect.

She was going to a family wedding with her boyfriend, feeling like they were taking the next step in their relationship, and she wanted to look just right.

“I bought it for my boyfriend-at-the-time sister’s wedding, and it was where I was getting to meet his parents for the first time,” she says. “Little did I know, I was also getting to meet his future wife.”

elizaIO / Flickr - CC

We know we're supposed to reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste, but can local companies that make recycling their business turn a profit? Then, an eyewitness to the attack on Pearl Harbor shares her experience in Hawaii during World War II.

Miles of Christmas lights could be headed out the door as more consumers look at switching from traditional holiday lights to their LED counterparts. Kansas City-based Southeast Enterprises is looking to keep the discarded strands out of landfills.

Southeast Enterprises Business Director Megan Gurera says they accept any unused or broken strands of lights.

“You know the ones you pullout, get ready to put up, and half of it works,” says Gurera.

Southeast Enterprises is a sheltered workshop, employing 160 people with development or intellectual disabilities.

The Birth Of Local Curbside Glass Recycling

Jul 25, 2012

Chances are, a truck drives by your neighborhood to pick up recyclables. Convenient, right?

But, what about glass? It's either throw it away, or pack those old bottles in your car and drive to the nearest glass recycling bin.

Well, now there might be a third option.

Bigstock.com

Recycling efforts at KU hospital have cut down the amount of waste it sends to local landfills by more than a half million pounds.  The two-year decline has caught the attention of the Environmental Protection Agency, which recently awarded the hospital a national achievement award for waste reduction.

Jim Callier, the EPA’s pollution prevention and solid waste program manager for this region, says such efforts are critical for saving valuable resources and curbing harmful emissions.

Residential Composting

May 25, 2011

Dan Heryer and Brooke Salvaggio from BADSEED Farms visit the studio to talk about ways to compost at home and their new residential composting program starting next month. 

Brooke says that 75% of our household waste is compostable.  Residential composting can be done using any natural materials.