Racism

University of Missouri System

The University of Missouri Board of Curators announced Thursday that Michael Middleton will serve as interim president of the UM System.

Middleton served as the deputy chancellor of MU for 17 years before retiring in August. He was appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court last month to co-chair the Commission on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in state courts. He also served as a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The first few days of this week brought the resignation of both the University of Missouri President, Tim Wolfe, and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin in Columbia — and those events left staff and students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City asking questions about the racial climate on their campus.

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resigned this morning amid pressure from the football team and building racial tensions on the Mizzou campus. We hear Wolfe's remarks from this morning and discuss what led to his resignation. 

Guests:

davidroediger.org

What does it mean to be white? Can we have a discussion about race without talking about whiteness? KU history professor David Roediger, a leading national scholar in "white studies," joins us to discuss his work.

Guest:

  • David R. Roediger, Professor of History and American Studies, University of Kansas

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Slavery along the Missouri River in what is now the Kansas City metro area was not the slavery of Gone With The Wind.

University of Missouri-Kansas City history professor Diane Mutti-Burke, who has written extensively about slavery in Missouri, says slave owners tended to have less than 20 slaves. Those with more than 20 are historically defined as "plantations."

From the Not My Ozarks Facebook page

Rachel Luster wasn’t happy when news started showing up in her social media feeds that the Ku Klux Klan wanted to train “the first recruits… in a mighty army” in her part of the Ozarks.

Just 80 years ago, the word racism barely existed. How did it — along the word racist — become such loaded terms? We invite a New York Times reporter, the president of the Urban League and a professor of linguistics and sociocultural anthropology to discuss how we talk about racism today — and the power of those two words.

Guests:

After nearly 120 years, jockey Issac Burns Murphy's winning record is still the highest in American horse racing history.  Though he won three Kentucky Derbies and set numerous records throughout his career, Murphy had to deal with the harsh reality of being black in the still deeply segregated South.

On this edition of Up to Date Pellom McDaniels III talks with Steve Kraske about his new biography of "The Prince of Jockeys" whose life and career spanned the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow.

Missouri Valley Special Collections / Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri

Eds note: This look at the Troost corridor is  part of KCUR's months-long examination of how geographic borders affect our daily lives in Kansas City. KCUR will go Beyond Our Borders and spark a community conversation through social outreach and innovative journalism. 

We will share the history of these lines, how the borders affect the current Kansas City experience and what’s being done to bridge or dissolve them. 

Blood Done Sign My Name

Mar 15, 2012

In 1970, a young black man was senselessly beaten and murdered by a group of white store owners in Oxford, North Carolina.

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