psychology

Well Go USA Entertainment

Chocolates and flowers are gifts you could give for Mother's Day. But how about a gift you should give? Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics suggest one of these movies for a date night with Mom (dinner plans not included).

Steve Walker

Hounds of Love, Not rated

fleecetraveler / Flickr -- CC

Some of the oldest and most diverse residents of Kansas City are its trees. As a new tree-planting effort is underway, get to know KC through its trees ... and learn about what we should and shouldn't plant here.

Plus: what are we really getting at when we point to freedom of speech to justify certain thoughts?

Guests:

Netflix

The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why has received praise and criticism for how it approaches weighty topics such as teen bullying, sexuality, mental illness and suicide. Today we speak with psychologist Wes Crenshaw, who says the drama can encourage important discussions between parents and their children.

Flickr-CC

It can be hard for parents to have a genuine talk with their teen-aged children without it ending up as awkward, emotional, or even worse, unproductive. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw discusses what is, and isn't, valid in a conversation with your teen.

Colby Ellis / Flickr - CC

Football can be pretty violent. Today, two local physicians discuss whether school boards should continue to support contact sports for high-schoolers. Then, get tips on crafting an apology that will avoid making a bad situation worse.

themonastery.org

Life can be difficult for people who don't fit into societal constructs of "male" and "female," but changing approaches, especially among young people, to gender identity and sexual preference are having an effect. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw and a local transgender student discuss the challenges associated with growing up outside traditional conventions, and provide some strategies for coping.

El Dorado Police Department

In a twisted crime spree that lasted from 1974 until 1991, Dennis Rader stalked and killed ten people in and around Wichita, Kansas. During and after the spree, he taunted pursuing authorities in letters he sent to police, local news and, once, left in a book at the public library. In the letters, Rader established his identity with a handle that caught on quickly: BTK.

El Dorado Police Department

First, a forensic psychologist who spent years communicating with Dennis Rader reveals what drove the serial murderer to kill 10 people in and around Wichita, Kansas. Then, two of Kansas City's best-known jazz performers talk about their latest album, how they met, and the area jazz scene.

This year's election is affecting millions, even those not old enough to vote. Licensed psychologist Wes Crenshaw explains why this event may be difficult for young people to process and how to help them move forward.

American Psychological Association

On November 8, Missouri voters will decide on Constitutional Amendment 2. If passed, it would limit campaign contributions and, proponents say, the political sway of big-money donors. Also, if you think you're the only one getting stressed out by the presidential election, think again.

In the early 1690s, Massachusetts got swept up in the madness of witch hunts, which culminated in the Salem witch trials and the execution of 20 people. On this edition of Up To Date, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stacy Schiff talks about the 1692 tragedy that still fascinates us today, and how it compares to modern times.

Nokdie / Flickr - CC

At the beginning of most marriages, divorce is likely the last thing on the bride and groom's minds. Unfortunately, with divorce rates hovering around 40 percent, a separation is something a lot of couples will have to navigate at one point or another.

Why is it the person we were head over heels for just a few months ago now seems a bit ... boring? Clinician and researcher Stan Tatkin says our brains are wired to kick into auto-pilot after a while, but it doesn't have to mean the end of the relationship.

Danny Lyon / courtesy of Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The violence and horror of cell phone videos of the recent police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have galvanized many Americans to question race relations and justice.

We take a look back at iconic civil rights era photos, and then invite a psychologist and criminologist to explore the effect of images of violence, past and present, on our minds and our culture.

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Claiming patients who experience psychosis have a chemical imbalance is an easy and incomplete explanation to a complicated problem. Treating patients with medication doesn't work for everyone, but other options do exist. Some are finding hope and better quality of life with a more holistic approach.

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There's a new phrase being used to describe what happens when, say, a government fails to protect its citizens, or a university fails to protect its students. What are the symptoms and side effects of being betrayed by an institution, and are there ways for institutions to make things right?

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Social media can be a place where middle schoolers feel like they can develop relationships. But the dangers of sharing information on the Internet can be frightening. We talk about navigating a complicated online world. 

Guest:

  • Dr. Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.

Stuff

Mar 10, 2016

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

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Swipe left or swipe right, mobile dating apps have gotten traction with the younger crowd but do they lead to lasting connections? We ask how young people are using them: as a path to a relationship, or to find sex?

Guests:

  • Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology and the author of I Always Want to Be Where I'm Not: Successful Living with ADD and ADHD.
  • Lauren is an architectural engineer in her early twenties and Tinder user.

The five stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. When loved ones are lost to violent crime, some say the more appropriate final stage is not acceptance, but understanding. With a rise in Kansas City's homicide rate, experts and citizens discuss the psychological fallout of living with the reality of violent crime.

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There comes a moment in every parent's life when they have to give up control of the wheel and hand it over to their children. We discuss how to prepare your kids for the responsibility of driving a car.

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Moving Out

Jul 13, 2015

Whether heading off to college or to a new job, many young adults are preparing to be on their own for the first time.  Up to Date looks at how teens and twenty-somethings can successfully take the training wheels off their adulthood.

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For many, the goal after living through trauma is to get back to normal. On this edition of Up To Date, guest host Brian Ellison speaks with two authors who tell stories of people who not only survive tragedy, but thrive in the aftermath. 

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Lisa Brewster / Flickr

My Little Ponies may be great enticements for toilet training, but new research shows that material rewards for accomplishments can lead to materialism down the road. Kids raised with "stuff" as the main motivator for good behavior disproportionately correlate material things with self-worth as adults. The researcher discusses her findings. 

Guest:

  • Lan Chaplin, University of Illinois in Chicago

"All happy families are alike. Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." So wrote Leo Tolstoy. Was he right, or are there shared characteristics that toxic families tend to have in common? A certain amount of shared sadness and conflict is inevitable; what differentiates a family that responds with closeness and trust from a family that cracks under pressure? Plus, strategies for mending toxic relationships or getting distance.

Guest:

  • Dacia Moore, licensed professional counselor

NPR / Invisibilia

NPR's newest show, Invisibilia, combines narrative storytelling and scientific research to address the intangible forces that affect our lives, like our thoughts, our emotions, and our ideas.  

On Tuesdays's Up To Date, the show's hosts talk about the making of Invisibilia, and the stories they hope to tell. 

Guests:

Good criticism can make all the difference, but that doesn't make it fun to hear. It can also be tough to deliver, even when it's intended in a loving spirit. Self-examination, careful listening and sensitive timing can go a long way, when both giving and receiving input.

Guest:

  • Bruce Liese, psychologist and professor of family medicine, The University of Kansas Medical Center

There's a silence in the conversation. Does your hand start inching involuntarily toward your phone? The speed and easy access of communication technology has changed the way we relate: to each other, our surroundings, ourselves, and our time. But as we communicate more quickly and more often, are the bonds we forge any stronger?

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Teens process and express grief in very particular ways. In the aftermath of two suicides at an Olathe high school, and while the shooting of Michael Brown is still a recent memory, experts shed light on how people at this sensitive developmental stage cope with profound loss. Plus, information on how adults in their lives can help.

Guests:

High standards. A desire for greater control. A predisposition toward anxiety or depression. These traits are common among people who suffer from eating disorders, like anorexia and bulimia. These illnesses are complex, multifaceted and incredibly dangerous. Body image is just the tip of the iceberg.

Guests:

  • Dr. Ashley McCune, counselor, InSight
  • Jon Smith, patient in recovery

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