Presidential campaign

It's official — the much-anticipated Iowa Caucuses have begun and voters around the country will be watching closely for the results this evening. We check in with reporters, political analysts and Kansas Citians who made the trip to Iowa to join the party.

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For many in the Kansas City area, the name Jeff Roe may ring a bell. Known as a “bad boy” of Missouri politics, Roe has been behind some of the most ruthless political campaigns in the past decade. Now, he takes on his biggest campaign yet — Ted Cruz's run for President.

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Denise Cross / Flickr-cc

Wyandotte County, Kansas, is one of only two counties in the country where three different ethnic groups — Black, Hispanic and White — each make up more than 25 percent of the population.

How residents feel about that diversity though, is about as diverse as the county itself. 

For some, the medley of different ethnicities in the county has given them a unique perspective on life and opened their eyes to other cultures.

In one week, the hypothesizing and conjecturing will stop — at least for a moment as real voters express their preferences for the presidency at the Iowa Caucuses. On this edition of Up To Date, political experts David von Drehle and Carl Cannon talk with Steve Kraske about the 2016 presidential race.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

For almost a year, presidential candidates have been crisscrossing Iowa, wooing voters in a state that relies on agriculture for about one-third of its economy. But even here, most voters live in cities or suburbs and don’t have a first-hand connection to the farm.

That makes it difficult to get candidates talking about food system issues from school lunches, to crop supports, to water quality. Yet these all fall under the federal agriculture department. If candidates aren’t talking about them in Iowa, it’s possible they’ll be left out of the campaigns entirely.

The much-anticipated Iowa Caucuses — which are known to decide each party's final front runners — are three months away.  On this edition of Up To Date, we talk to Des Moines Register reporter Jason Noble about the culture the caucuses have created in the state and why Iowa has dibs on the first major contest in the presidential  race. 

Former U.S. Senator John Danforth has spent years speaking out against the abuses of our political system. On this edition of Up To Date,  he speaks with Steve Kraske about Missouri, the 2016 presidential race and his latest book, The Relevance of Religion: How Faithful People Can Change Politics.

KCUR's Political Pundits join Steve Kraske to discuss the ascendant Donald Trump, and the second GOP presidential debate.

Guests:  

  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star's political reporter.
  • Burdett Loomis is a professor of political scientist at the University of Kansas.
  • Jessica Lee is an assistant professor at KU's School of Business.

Up To Date rounds up its political pundits to discuss presidential and Missouri gubernatorial politics of 2016 and the current standing of Governor Sam Brownback in Kansas. 

Guests:

  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star’s political reporter.
  • Bob Beatty is a professor of political science at Washburn University.
  • Dave Robertson is a professor of political science at the University of Missouri, St. Louis.

  The gun has officially gone off for the 2016 presidential elections, and NPR's team of political correspondents and editors are working around the clock to bring you the latest from the White House and the campaign trail. On this edition of Up To Date, we check in with Tamara Keith, Scott Horsley, and Domenico Montanaro

David Axelrod’s theme of “change” propelled Barack Obama to the presidency. He went on to serve as the President’s Senior Advisor. Steve Kraske speaks with Axelrod about his time with the President, and his new book  Believer: My Forty Years in Politics.

Calumet Editions

Kansas City's Steven Jacques has more than 35 years of experience in national politics. He's worked on hundreds of White House advance teams, and even more presidential campaigns.

On this edition of Up To Date, he speaks with Steve Kraske about his new novel,  Advance Man: A Presidential Campaign Adventure and what the life of a White House advance man is really like. 

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40 years ago this year, George McGovern , the Democratic nominee for president, made history by picking Missouri's Tom Eagleton as his vice-presidential running mate.

Oxford University Press

No matter how charismatic a candidate may be, it's not the individual who wins the Presidency, it's the team around him or her.