Presidential campaign

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon's time in office ends in a few months, but forthcoming attempts in the Statehouse to override his vetoes of bills proposing tighter voter ID rules, looser concealed carry regulations, and an increased price-tag for a driver's license are keeping him plenty busy.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Congress is in recess until September but the upcoming general election, ongoing data breaches, and sustained congressional unpopularity means our elected officials won't get much time to relax. While they sit on opposing sides of the aisle, Reps. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Missouri, and Kevin Yoder, R-Kansas, agree there's plenty of work left to be done.

It's hard to remember a time when voters were more frustrated with the Democratic and Republican options on offer. With the possibility of a banner year for the Greens and Libertarians, we look at the role and influence of third parties.

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Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

To say they know a little something about national politics would be an understatement: David Von Drehle, editor-at-large for TIME, and Mike Allen, chief White House correspondent for POLITICO, share their insights on the presidential race so far and what to expect from the rest of the election season.

For years, political polling told us who was  likely to vote and how, but the cell phone complicated all that. With fewer people answering — or even owning — land-line numbers, polls became less reliable. A Chicago start-up is changing that tradition, and finding success.

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Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

U.S. Congressman Kevin Yoder says it remains to be seen if Kansans will back presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump in November.

Though Yoder has endorsed Trump, he waited to do so until after Ted Cruz and other candidates had dropped out of the race.

“My position is I support the nominee,” says Yoder.

Yoder says while Trump wasn’t his first choice, he doesn’t think Hillary Clinton reflects Kansas values.

There's a lot to talk about in politics right now. The Kansas Legislative session is over, Missouri's session is in its final week, and the race for the presidential nomination is headed for the finish line. Up To Date's political pundits hash it all out. 

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Politics happen along party lines, and we mean that in more ways than one. Kansas Citians on the art of political fundraising. Specifically, the local fundraising parties that fill the coffers of national candidates.

Guests:

  • Sharon Hoffman, organizer for a variety of causes and candidates, including Obama's 2008 and 2012 Kansas City campaigns
  • Annie Presley, principle, McKellar Group

On Tuesday, voters in five states went to the polls to cast their vote for the presidential candidates. On this edition of Up To Date, we analyze the Missouri primary, which turned out to be the closest race of the night. 

Guests:

  • Peverill Squire is the Hicks and Martha Griffiths Chair in American Political Institutions at the University of Missouri.
  • Robynn Kuhlmann is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Central Missouri.

Undecided on your candidates this election? There's an app for that. On this edition of Up To Date, we talk voter "matchmaking" apps, new technology and how candidates are using different platforms to reach citizens.

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The variety of candidates running for President means lots of choices for the electorate.  So, what factors influence our vote? From party affiliation to electability, we look at what considerations play into our voting decisions.

Guests:

  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas.
  • Robert Rowland is a professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas.

Abraham Lincoln is remembered for his skill as an orator, but the president also utilized other tools to better connect with voters. His use of photography, which was a cutting-edge technology in his day and age, helped him to victory in the tough 1860 election. 

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It's official — the much-anticipated Iowa Caucuses have begun and voters around the country will be watching closely for the results this evening. We check in with reporters, political analysts and Kansas Citians who made the trip to Iowa to join the party.

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For many in the Kansas City area, the name Jeff Roe may ring a bell. Known as a “bad boy” of Missouri politics, Roe has been behind some of the most ruthless political campaigns in the past decade. Now, he takes on his biggest campaign yet — Ted Cruz's run for President.

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Denise Cross / Flickr-cc

Wyandotte County, Kansas, is one of only two counties in the country where three different ethnic groups — Black, Hispanic and White — each make up more than 25 percent of the population.

How residents feel about that diversity though, is about as diverse as the county itself. 

For some, the medley of different ethnicities in the county has given them a unique perspective on life and opened their eyes to other cultures.

In one week, the hypothesizing and conjecturing will stop — at least for a moment as real voters express their preferences for the presidency at the Iowa Caucuses. On this edition of Up To Date, political experts David von Drehle and Carl Cannon talk with Steve Kraske about the 2016 presidential race.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

For almost a year, presidential candidates have been crisscrossing Iowa, wooing voters in a state that relies on agriculture for about one-third of its economy. But even here, most voters live in cities or suburbs and don’t have a first-hand connection to the farm.

That makes it difficult to get candidates talking about food system issues from school lunches, to crop supports, to water quality. Yet these all fall under the federal agriculture department. If candidates aren’t talking about them in Iowa, it’s possible they’ll be left out of the campaigns entirely.

The much-anticipated Iowa Caucuses — which are known to decide each party's final front runners — are three months away.  On this edition of Up To Date, we talk to Des Moines Register reporter Jason Noble about the culture the caucuses have created in the state and why Iowa has dibs on the first major contest in the presidential  race. 

Former U.S. Senator John Danforth has spent years speaking out against the abuses of our political system. On this edition of Up To Date,  he speaks with Steve Kraske about Missouri, the 2016 presidential race and his latest book, The Relevance of Religion: How Faithful People Can Change Politics.

KCUR's Political Pundits join Steve Kraske to discuss the ascendant Donald Trump, and the second GOP presidential debate.

Guests:  

  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star's political reporter.
  • Burdett Loomis is a professor of political scientist at the University of Kansas.
  • Jessica Lee is an assistant professor at KU's School of Business.

Up To Date rounds up its political pundits to discuss presidential and Missouri gubernatorial politics of 2016 and the current standing of Governor Sam Brownback in Kansas. 

Guests:

  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star’s political reporter.
  • Bob Beatty is a professor of political science at Washburn University.
  • Dave Robertson is a professor of political science at the University of Missouri, St. Louis.

  The gun has officially gone off for the 2016 presidential elections, and NPR's team of political correspondents and editors are working around the clock to bring you the latest from the White House and the campaign trail. On this edition of Up To Date, we check in with Tamara Keith, Scott Horsley, and Domenico Montanaro

David Axelrod’s theme of “change” propelled Barack Obama to the presidency. He went on to serve as the President’s Senior Advisor. Steve Kraske speaks with Axelrod about his time with the President, and his new book  Believer: My Forty Years in Politics.

Calumet Editions

Kansas City's Steven Jacques has more than 35 years of experience in national politics. He's worked on hundreds of White House advance teams, and even more presidential campaigns.

On this edition of Up To Date, he speaks with Steve Kraske about his new novel,  Advance Man: A Presidential Campaign Adventure and what the life of a White House advance man is really like. 

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40 years ago this year, George McGovern , the Democratic nominee for president, made history by picking Missouri's Tom Eagleton as his vice-presidential running mate.

Oxford University Press

No matter how charismatic a candidate may be, it's not the individual who wins the Presidency, it's the team around him or her.