pop culture

Focus Features

Looking for a way to reward yourself for getting out there and snagging some great deals on Black Friday, or  just wanting to avoid the crush of shoppers altogether?  Then get to an area theater and see one (or more) of the movies recommended by Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

Moho Film and Yong Film

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Whether you're looking for a break from grocery shopping, baking, or ornery relatives, Up To Date has the solution; our indie, foreign and documentary film critics are back with movie recommendations for the weekend. Check them out while they're still showing on area screens.

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

The creator and editor-in-chief of MuslimGirl.com talks about the challenges facing Muslim women in the wake of Donald Trump's election. Then we examine the soundtrack of the Vietnam War, and listen to some of the songs that helped American troops get through the conflict.

A24 Films

It has been a long week for a lot of reasons. If you are looking for a little respite and relief, check out this weekend's recommendations from the Up To Date indie, foreign and documentary film critics before they are no longer available on area big-screens. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

  • The story of a young black man struggling to find, and accept, himself while growing up in a rough neighborhood in Miami.

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

Byron Newman / Amazon Studios / Magnolia Pictures

No one will blame you for tuning out the presidential campaign and looking for a way to avoid election stress disorder while waiting for November 8th to blow over. In fact, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics' latest recommendations are essentially a prescription for a weekend full of music, movies and popcorn.

Like a good story, a song changes over time as it passes through different voices. We explore the Anatomy of a Song with writer and Wall Street Journal contributor Marc Myers, who recollects the oral histories behind some of the greatest classics in the past fifty years.

Teen films from the 1980s (think Fast Times at Ridgemont High and 16 Candles) helped define a generation, but their influence on American culture lasted much longer than the decade in which they were released.

Shirley Jones and Patrick Cassidy are the mother-and-son team starring in  Have You Met Miss Jones, a musical that chronicles the life of the talented actress and soprano. They share what it's like to balance show business with everyday life and how a family that works together stays together. 

'Have You Met Miss Jones' premieres at New Theatre Restaurant September 22 and runs through November 27. Find more information at newtheatre.com.

Henry Grossman

With their cameras, the best photographers can change how we see and think about the world around us. For more than 50 years, Henry Grossman has made portraits of cultural and political  legends, including The Beatles, Muhammad Ali and President John F. Kennedy.

Michael Byars / KCUR 89.3

Taryn Miller is a musician from Winfield, Kansas, who plays under the moniker Your Friend. She was signed to Domino Records, home of Animal Collective and Blood Orange, in 2014, and the label re-released Miller's first self-produced EP, Jekyl/Hyde. After graduating from the University of Kansas, she jumped straight into working on a full-length album and touring internationally. 

KCUR 89.3

Kianna Alarid and Jared White are the songwriters for the band Yes You Are. Alarid spent her early 20s as the front woman for  Tilly And The Wall, a band from Omaha, Nebraska that toured internationally. The band broke up after two of the members married and started having kids, so Alarid moved to Kansas City.

Here, her music took an about face from lo-fidelity indie to polished pop. She met White through Facebook while the two were separately toiling over songwriting; in 2013 they joined forces to form Yes You Are. 

Anna Leach

Around 11:15 p.m. Sunday night, a police car drove by a crowd of around 60 people gathered near J.C. Nichols Fountain.

A shout rang out, and others quickly chimed in, the calls of what seemed like the entire group filling the warm night air.

The yelling, though, quickly morphed into laughter.

“‘I wanna be the very best,’” Rafeael Arevael sang, echoing the song that continued to blast out of the passing car.

Pop

May 20, 2016

We explore the latest in pop culture news with our panel of critics.

Guests:

  • Loey Lockerby, freelance writer
  • Shaun Hammontree, video director, motion graphics designer and composer
  • Natasha El-Scari, poet

When you think about presidents and pop culture, you might picture Obama’s Twitter account, but you might not realize that other ventures with mass-appeal have been affecting the White House for a few centuries.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we’ll talk about the influence everything from theater to books to the internet have had on the presidency since Thomas Jefferson was in charge.

HEAR MORE: Tevi Troy speaks at 6:30 p.m. July 24 at the Plaza branch of the Kansas City Public Library.

Alyson Raletz, KCUR

With a ukelele and jazz guitar in tow, the traveling Kansas City-based musical duo known as Victor & Penny stopped by Central Standard on Wednesday to talk with Gina Kaufmann — and to perform a few of their signature "antique pop" songs live for our listeners.

How To Be Black

Aug 7, 2012

How black is our guest Baratunde Thurston

Coolness Secrets Revealed

Jul 9, 2012

On this Tuesday's Central Standard, we’ll meet the researcher who conducted the empirical investigation of what it means to be cool, and found there’s a lot more to it than just likability or popularity. Think James Dean. Think the Fonz.

Civil Rights Exhibit Displays The Power Of Popular Media

May 9, 2012
Charlie Upchurch / KCUR

In 1955, Emmitt Till was a young boy visiting family in the South, and was brutally murdered. After his death, his mother made the decision to send the explicit photos of his autopsy to the media, saying, “Let the world see what I’ve seen.”