non-profits

H2O

Jul 14, 2016

Kansas City might be an unusual place to headquarter an international organization that helps bring clean water to people around the world. A chat with Gary White, KC native and co-founder of Water.org.

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Attitudes about hospice and palliative care have changed dramatically over the last 40 years, and the number of patients who receive this type of treatment has expanded. Two longtime leaders in the field, though, acknowledge that more work is needed to ease the pain and suffering of the most ailing patients.

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Two sham cancer charities that allegedly scammed nearly $76 million from consumers will be dissolved, their president banned from charity fundraising and their assets liquidated in a settlement announced today with all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Federal Trade Commission.

A majority of American veterans, both able-bodied and wounded, say they want to continue to serve after fighting overseas. TIME Magazine’s Joe Klein details the story behind two soldiers who show fellow veterans how to use their war skills to rebuild communities here and abroad in his new book, Charlie Mike.

Charitable giving in the United States rose for the fifth consecutive year in 2014 and now exceeds $358 billion. Many individuals and organizations are choosing to contribute through donor-advised funds. We learn more about this trend, and how it affects nonprofit organizations and charities. 

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Wikipedia / KCUR

On September 15, members of the Tiny House Collective KC, a non-profit that supports people building homes of less than 1,000 square feet, became concerned for their friend and colleague Joshua Farmer.

Natasha Kirsch
Julie Denesha / / KCUR

Natasha Kirsch was volunteering at an alcoholic and addict recovery home when the idea—and a well-timed phone call — came to her.

Sitting in the business office, Kirsch said, it would not be unusual for eight to 10 women to be sitting on the couch outside, asking for help finding and getting a job. They needed the income and the stability — many had several kids and few resources.

But there was a problem: Most were high school dropouts with low reading levels, many had felonies on their records. What job skills could they market? And who would hire them? 

Getting a job can be tough--even impossible-- when you've been in prison. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with a Lawrence man who started the non-profit Sun Cedar specifically to give these people a fresh start in the workplace.

Guest:

  • Shine Adams, founder of Sun Cedar 

Officials with Guadalupe Centers, Inc. are lining up inspections and applications with an eye to converting the 19-acre St Paul School of Theology from an historic Baptist seminary to an elementary school, summer program and possibly even a credit union.

Guadalupe Centers, Inc. CEO Cris Medina says their increasingly popular charter schools and other services don’t just serve Hispanics, but also Somalis, Sudanese and South East Asians. Many of those who take advantage of their services, he says, live on the east side of town.

This month, Palle Rilinger retired after 27 years as a social worker and president of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault.  MOCSA focuses on reducing the harm of sexual assault and abuse through treatment, prevention and advocacy.