Missouri Department of Conservation

Up To Date
4:53 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Why Did The Turtle Cross The Road?

The box turtle is making its way across Missouri in search of love. The problem? It's trying to cross the road, and it's not all-too speedy.
Credit Wikipedia Commons

It’s that time of year when turtles become easy targets on Missouri and Kansas highways.

Turns out that male box turtles don’t know any better. They’re just out looking for mates, and that journey has them crossing busy highways where too often they become road kill.

In the final portion of Tuesday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a biologist from the Missouri Department of Conservation about those all too vulnerable turtles.

Guest:

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NPR Story
7:23 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Deer Hunters Asked To Help Prevent Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease In Mo.

(via Flickr/Robert Scoble)

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 9:21 am

Conservation officials in Missouri want deer hunters to take precautions this fall in order to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease.

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Environment
10:00 am
Mon July 8, 2013

After Conservation Efforts, Elk Herd Thriving In Missouri

Some 100 elk are living in southeast Missouri after an effort to restore the species to the state.
David Stonner Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri conservation officials say they are pleased with the way a three-year effort to restore elk to the southeastern part of the state is going.

The last group of elk arrived at the Peck Ranch conservation area this spring, bringing the total to around 100 animals.

Department of Conservation resource scientist Lonnie Hansen says the state will start controlling the population when it reaches about 400 elk.

Until then, the focus is on keeping the animals healthy.

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Environment
8:09 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Efforts To Restore Missouri Elk Herd Succeeding

These two bull elk were among the first to arrive at Peck Ranch in May, 2011. They were outfitted with GPS collars for tracking purposes.
David Stonner Missouri Department of Conservation

Efforts to reestablish an elk population in southeastern Missouri are now in their third year, and the Missouri Department of Conservation considers the project a success.

There are close to 70 elk now living in parts of Carter, Shannon and Reynolds counties, with another 50 arriving in May.

A number of calves have been born at Peck Ranch, including this 2011 newborn.

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Environment
8:30 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Drought Helps Bobwhites And Other Birds

An adult male bobwhite quail.
wikimedia commons

While this summer’s drought and heat wave ravaged crops in Missouri, it actually benefitted some of the bird species within the state, especially bobwhite quail.

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Agriculture
4:19 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Fall Colors Expected Despite Stress Of Summer

Fall color on a Monroe County farm.
David Stonner Missouri Department of Conservation

Recent rain showers across Missouri may salvage the state’s fall foliage, according to state conservation officials.

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KC Currents
5:01 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

A Late Night Frog Gig

Jeremy Soucy of the Missouri Department of Conservation holds up a small bullfrog.
Suzanne Hogan KCUR

In Missouri, the bullfrog and green frog harvest season starts on the night of June 30th and last through the end of October. 

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Up to Date
10:17 am
Wed July 25, 2012

Wind Ahead Of Rain? Fuel For Forest Fires

Missouri Dept. of Public Safety

You'll be hard-pressed to find someone who wouldn't welcome a rain shower after weeks of heat and drought in the region.

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Central Standard
2:26 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

Endangered Beetles Hit the Dirt

The beetles were buried with their food source, a bird carrion.
Bill Graham Missouri Department of Conservation

For the first time ever, an endangered species has been released back into Missouri prairies. The American Burying Beetle may be back on its way to thriving, though in this beetle's world, thriving means living underground and feasting on meatballs. 

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Environment
8:07 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Firewood Could Spread Invasive Beetle

The emerald ash borer.
USDA flickr

Conservation agents are urging Missourians to not transport firewood.  It’s part of an effort to control the emerald ash borer from spreading throughout the state.

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