Media Critics

Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this year, Karen Fuller, a former news anchor at KCTV-5, sued the station's owner, alleging the company created an age-ceiling for female anchors. Today, our Media Critics ask: Why is it common to have older newsmen on television but rare to see women anchors of a similar age?

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump has referred to major media outlets such as The New York Times and CNN as "the enemy of the American people." But what does that unwanted title mean for journalists, and journalism itself, moving forward? We bring in the Media Critics to answer that one. Also, should a news outlet assign reporters based on race? Find out what our panel thinks about the recent lawsuit between a local reporter and television news station involving that very issue.

Sgt. Alicia Brand / U.S. Army

The president's lambasting of certain outlets as "fake news" has strained relations between the executive branch and the Fourth Estate. Today, the Media Critics discuss whether or not the journalism playbook should be rewritten to cover an unprecedented administration.

Thomas Leuthard / Flickr-CC

Media critic Jay Rosen has been writing about evidence-based vs. accusation-driven journalism for years. Rosen joins us, along with a few local thinkers, in conversation about what's at stake for journalism, and what's next, as we head into a Trump presidency.

With the presidential campaigns reaching a fever pitch, the Media Critics discuss whether or not journalists hold Hillary Clinton to a different standard than Donald Trump, and if the press is giving political "spin" the same importance as evidence-based facts. Then, Bill Brownlee introduces Various Blonde in this week's Local Listen.

This was an incredible year for journalists —  from the battle to legalize gay marriage, to the student protests at the University of Missouri and then, of course, Donald Trump. The Media Critics discuss how the biggest stories of the year were covered and how the public perceives the industry.

Guests: 

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently sparked a firestorm by naming a woman who may have been the victim of a sexual assault. On this edition of Up To Date, the Media Critics discuss the newspaper's decision. Plus, they analyze coverage of the Charleston, South Carolina, tragedy and the historic Kansas legislative session.  

Guests:

Frank Morris / KCUR

The police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the Royals finally making it back to the world series, intense races for governor and the U.S. senate in Kansas, 2014 was a year of big news on both sides of the state line.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and the Media Critics break down area news coverage. They look at how national and foreign media covered major stories, and they bring us their take on the most over-reported and under-reported news of the year.

Frank Morris / KCUR

Covering intense events in the heat of the moment isn’t easy.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we turn a critical eye toward the press in the wake of the events in Ferguson, as the Media Critics join us.

Guests:

  • Derek Donovan, The Kansas City Star
  • Pam Fine, University of Kansas
  • Frank Morris, KCUR
  • Margie Freivogel, news editor for St. Louis Public Radio

MacBeales/Flickr-CC

We’ve all seen the news breaking on Twitter, on Facebook and on the TV news tickers, but how often does the rush to be first end in a chorus of apologies for getting it wrong? 

On Tuesday's Up to Date, the Media Critics join Steve Kraske to discuss the big issues in journalism today. 

Guests:

The Media Critics, August 12, 2013

Aug 11, 2013
The Kansas City Star

Everyone's got an opinion on what that media's doing right-- and what it's doing wrong. On Monday's Up to Date, we talk with a few experts from the trenches about recent headlines: Derek Donovan, public editor at The Kansas City Star, Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media, and Pam Fine, Knight Chair & professor of journalism at the University of Kansas all weigh in on the topics. 

These days, it's hard to tell if you're reading a celebrity tabloid or the day's headlines.

Jason Noble, Des Moines Register

It’s easy to lose interest in political campaigns, but it’s the news media’s responsibility to make it interesting – and get it right.