live music

South African Tourism / Flickr — CC

How can you keep it in?

Don’t even try this weekend, with so many activities to tempt your expressive side, from the pure nostalgia of “Hey, hey, we’re the Monkees” (one of them, anyway) to the opportunity to literally skate away from your troubles.

So how can you not let it out? There you go.

1. ‘50 Summers of Love’

Courtesy Brad Norman

Lawrence once had a legendary punk club where bands like Nirvana, Sonic Youth and Fugazi played. But it was no CBGB or Whiskey a Go Go. It was east of downtown, tucked between a pumpkin patch and seemingly endless fields of crops, in a windowless, low-slung concrete building that sat back a bit from the road.

William P. Gottlieb / Library of Congress

It’s time for the weekend, which means attendant smiles can’t be far behind.

Ways to get happy include a cheerful mix of music, comedy and sports designed to stir pleasant memories, tickle fancies and raise any flagging spirits.

Grin and wear it!

1. Lionel Richie with Mariah Carey

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Financial woes at the American Jazz Museum aren't sitting well with city and state officials. 

"I'm concerned, like a lot of other people, about what's going on," says Missouri Rep. Emanuel Cleaver. "I don't think we ought to ignore this, ignore the problems, or dismiss them lightly."

CJ Janovy / KCUR 89.3

Update: This story was updated at 4:30 p.m. to include a city funding update. 

After experiencing "a cash flow issue" following the inaugural Kansas City Jazz and Heritage Festival over Memorial Day weekend, officials with the American Jazz Museum say all performers have been paid — after some musicians complained on social media earlier this week.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Whatever hue you may be, being colorful is a whole other thing.

Offering colorful guidance this weekend are activities promoting the exciting, the interesting and the unusual, from sparkling Fourth of July fireworks to the attitude-drenched stage debut of a famously animated cat.

What if you don’t need assistance being colorful? Lucky you. Get out there and lead by example!

1. Booms & Blooms

Jolynne_martinez--Flickr CC / photo circa 1962

I think we all know that Father’s Day is the second most important day of the year devoted to honoring a parent.

History suggests as much: President Woodrow Wilson made Mother’s Day an official U.S. holiday in 1914, yet it wasn’t until 1972 that President Richard Nixon did the same for Father’s Day, which failed to save him from the Watergate scandal. Nice try, Dick.

That said, playing second fiddle is important – just ask the guy playing second fiddle. So go and do something fun with your favorite paternal figure this Father’s Day weekend. No, not Mom! Good grief.

Courtesy The Elders

Opinions differ on the best examples of anything, whether it’s the finest flavor of ice cream or the greatest Batman villain.

Leave it to the weekend to provide some clarity, with quintessential samplings of history, music and public spectacle on tap.

And the most essential ice cream and Batman baddie? Chocolate and the Joker, obviously. Carry on.

1. Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center

NRK P3 / Flickr — CC

There are times for quietness and humility. This weekend isn’t one of those times.

Loud and proud things to do over the next few days include dynamic declarations of personal identity, a titanic celebration of great American rock bands and overt demonstrations of spirit-lifting silliness, from riding horses that aren’t really there to whipped pie bubble blowing.

It’s a cavalcade of different ways to get whatever’s inside out. That’s right, all of it. C’mon now!

​1. Kansas City PrideFest

Andrew Birgensmith / Kansas City Symphony

Music does so much. But, perhaps most importantly, it accommodates.

Take this weekend’s cooperative passel of concerts encompassing multi-day celebrations of world-class jazz and roots music, the first gig of an English rock icon’s new international tour, cutting-edge DJs creating throbbing dreamscapes for the dance crowd and Kansas City’s own musical salute to Memorial Day.

Something for everyone? That’s the idea. Now if you could only be everywhere at once.

1. Kansas City Jazz and Heritage Festival

Robert Drózd / Wikimedia Commons

John Scofield continues to make strides in the music world. His latest album, Country For Old Men, won the 2016 Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. Today, the renowned guitarist recalls playing with the likes of Miles Davis and Charles Mingus.

Sven Mandel / Wikimedia Commons

Which matters most: The mind or the body? Or to put it another way: Albert Einstein or Marilyn Monroe?

The question (at least the first one) has echoed through the ages. Yet it may be ultimately a false dilemma, since ideally both the physical and the metaphysical are needed to max out human potential. Hey, I didn’t get a C in philosophy for nothing.

LitFestKC

Today, Jon Scieszka and Javaka Steptoe, heavy-hitters on the kid's lit scene, talk about promoting literacy and how the environment for fostering it has changed since they were little. They also reveal the creative processes behind some of their best-known works.

Victoria Morse / Flickr — CC

Most folks manage to find some comfort in the inevitable routine of daily life. Call it a survival skill. Or perhaps a self-imposed prison of the mind?

OK, that’s a little scary. So here’s your chance to break out from the humdrum – if only for the weekend – by experiencing the exotic pull of relatively unusual or even outlandish things to do.

Caution: Don’t get too carried away, unless you don’t want to go back. Now that would be scary.

File Photo / Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Giving the people – the folks, the general population, basically everyone – what they want can be challenging. Especially since everyone these days seems to want something different.

Yet the inclusive notion of pleasing the masses may be a little easier this weekend with a folksy lineup of experiences grounded in proven public predilections, from time-tested musical entertainment to the timeless appeal of dinosaurs.

Remember, the common bond of folksiness is where you find it. So start looking!

Lance Cheung / U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

Jazz musicians have always gotten together to “jam,” but at some point the term also became a synonym for partying or any collective endeavor committed to cutting loose.

It goes at least as far back as the late 1970s, when I attended a couple of Summer Jam stadium rock extravaganzas that promised to blow my mind. They must have worked, because I can hardly remember a thing!

David Bickley

Hungarian composer Béla Bartók was a pianist. But some of the music Bartók wrote for strings, inspired by folk music, is considered among his most expressive and inventive. 

This weekend, Kansas City Symphony concertmaster Noah Geller will be the featured soloist in Bartók's Violin Concerto No. 2. 

Courtesy Kansas City Irish Center

The Kansas City Irish Center begins 2017 with much to celebrate. After almost a decade in the lower level of Union Station, last year the Center bought historic Drexel Hall, in Midtown at the corner of Linwood and Baltimore, and moved into its new home in September. 

“It’s in a location that we really want in the heart of the city, where a lot of the cultural activities are happening, and where the history of the Irish is in Kansas City,” says Nancy Wormington, the center’s executive director.

Courtesy Facebook

Kansas, the most successful rock band to originate from its namesake state, marks the 40th anniversary of Leftoverture by playing the hit 1976 album in its entirety on its current tour, which stops at in Kansas City on Saturday.

Three reasons we're listening to Kansas this week:

1. Kansas has always incorporated classical elements into its rock, making its appearance at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts less incongruous than it might seem.

You know Chuck Haddix as host of KCUR's Fish Fry, but his day job is director of UMKC's Marr Sound Archives. He finds truly surprising audio clips while working there, and he shares some with us in this edition of Up to Date. "It's like Christmas everyday," he says.

Michael Byars / KCUR 89.3

Taryn Miller is a musician from Winfield, Kansas, who plays under the moniker Your Friend. She was signed to Domino Records, home of Animal Collective and Blood Orange, in 2014, and the label re-released Miller's first self-produced EP, Jekyl/Hyde. After graduating from the University of Kansas, she jumped straight into working on a full-length album and touring internationally. 

Boy George wasn’t just known for his flamboyant look. The Culture Club front-man also made headlines with his drug use and run-ins with the law. We’ll find out how a sober Boy George approaches his addiction, his music and his fame.

KCUR 89.3

Kianna Alarid and Jared White are the songwriters for the band Yes You Are. Alarid spent her early 20s as the front woman for  Tilly And The Wall, a band from Omaha, Nebraska that toured internationally. The band broke up after two of the members married and started having kids, so Alarid moved to Kansas City.

Here, her music took an about face from lo-fidelity indie to polished pop. She met White through Facebook while the two were separately toiling over songwriting; in 2013 they joined forces to form Yes You Are. 

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Morgan Cooper is a Kansas City hip-hop emcee and cinematographer who has been making music for about two years. Under the name Barrel Maker, he collaborates with local producers Conductor Williams and Lion to create intricately layered songs about struggling, but always remaining positive and diligent to achieve his goals as an artist and citizen.

The folk-rock duo Brewer & Shipley, an act with deep ties to Kansas City, is still together more than 40 years after achieving a few international hits. They perform with the Ozark Mountain Daredevils at Crossroads KC on Saturday, July 2.

Three reasons we’re listening to Brewer & Shipley this week:

1. Brewer & Shipley’s relaxed, folk-rock sound is back in style. You can hear echoes of it in the music of young musicians such as Dawes and the Avett Brothers.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard, in which local musicians tell the story behind a recent song, and explain how it was constructed musically.

The musicianKristie Stremel, singer-songwriter

The song: "Orlando (Keep Dancing)"

The story: Just two days after a gunman left 49 dead at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Lawrence, Kansas-based singer-songwriter Stremel wrote a song to honor the victims.

Hannah Copeland / KCUR

About 7,000 volunteers and patrons traveled to a pasture on Saturday, June 11, near Cottonwood Falls, Kansas to listen to the Kansas City Symphony perform at the 11th annual Symphony in the Flint Hills.

As the sun began to set Saturday evening the crowd's attention was diverted to the co-stars of the outdoor concert: cows. Volunteer ranchers on horseback herded brown, white and black cattle across the bright green grassy hill behind the Symphony stage.

Steve Kraske caught up with Béla Fleck, who's on tour with the original Flecktones, to talk inspirations and collaborations. When it comes to music Fleck says, "It's just more interesting to explore the edges of things than it is to just sit in the center and do what's already been done."

Béla Fleck and the Flecktones perform at 7:30 p.m., June 14, in the Muriel Kauffman Theatre at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.  

Annual Jazz Festival Planned For Kansas City

May 22, 2016
americanjazzmuseum.com

Kansas City jazz fans take note: The executive director of the American Jazz Museum says we will have a world-class jazz festival and it will debut in just one year.

A City Council committee this week approved a renewal for the museum to continue to manage the 18th and Vine project. Jazz Museum Executive Director Cheptoo Kositani-Buckner used the occasion to tout the accomplishments of the district she has managed since January.

Barbara Haze

When things don’t necessarily go together, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t put them together.

Like a weekend mix tape. What do all those songs have in common? Maybe nothing, except they’re all on the same weekend mix tape.

See how this works? With or without a pre-selected soundtrack this weekend, try mixing up a combo of asymmetrical activities, a potpourri of divergent diversions – you know, a bunch of stuff. It’s your weekend. You should do what you want.

1. Planet Comicon

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