Late Show Gallery

Remembering the life of gallery owner Tom Deatherage, who passed away yesterday.

How does an artist see water? Two local artists explore the Missouri River; their work appears in Tributary, an exhibit at La Esquina Gallery.

Then, a newly-minted college grad returns home to KCK to give back.

Guests:

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

One of the Kansas City art world's most legendary characters — and most fearsome promoters of area artists — has died at age 74.

Tom Deatherage, who lived in an art-filled apartment above his gallery The Late Show, died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones after a long illness on Tuesday morning, according to friends who were present. He had been an art dealer in Kansas City for more than 25 years.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Each month on First Fridays, thousands of visitors stroll through galleries in the Crossroads Arts District. On the industrial northeast corner of the district, Tom Deatherage curates an eclectic mix of edgy, local art in his red, two-story The Late Show Gallery.

Deatherage, who lives in the apartment upstairs, says he’s always been drawn to artists and their work. And after more than 25 years of dealing in art, he says he knows what he likes.

Adolfo Gustavo Martinez

When Kansas City artist Adolfo Gustavo Martinez lived in Edinburg, Texas, in the 1980s, he spent most Sundays at bars in the border towns listening to live Tex-Mex music.

He recalls with fondness being able to see people grilling and partying just across the Rio Grande River in Mexico.

“The Rio Grande Valley isn’t very wide, probably like a street,” Martinez says. “You could see them right there, right across the river.”

The Iraqi Refugee Portrait Project

Jul 3, 2012

On this Tuesday's Central Standard, an Iraqi refugee explores the time he spent in a refugee camp through photographs. In his images, widows show him the one item they kept when they fled their homes.