Kansas Governor

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Some have said Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has been largely absent from this legislative session, but the power of his veto has loomed large. As we begin to come to the close of this session, KPR's Stephen Koranda reports on the relationship between the Governor and the Legislature.

United States Mission Geneva / Wikimedia Commons--CC

The Band's legendary final performance was over 40 years ago, but their fame lives on. The hit group's lead guitarist, Robbie Robertson, shares stories from the time he wrote "The Weight" in one night to jamming with Bob Dylan.

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The replacement of the Affordable Care Act, is currently making its way through Congress. As President Trump has said, healthcare "is an unbelievably complex subject," and the American Health Care Act is certainly raising concerns from those covered by Obamacare. Today,  we take your questions on how existing coverage could be affected if the AHCA is passed.

Morgan Said / KCUR 89.3

As a source says that Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback could be leaving the statehouse, Senate President Susan Wagle (R-Wichita) talks about how a new Governor could change this legislative session.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR 893

On this week's Statehouse Blend Kansas, Sen. Dinah Sykes (R-Lenexa) and Rep. Brett Parker (D-Overland Parker) give us their freshman perspective on Governor Sam Brownback's budget proposal, concealed carry on college campuses, and a possible new school funding formula.

Guests:

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Football can be pretty violent. Today, two local physicians discuss whether school boards should continue to support contact sports for high-schoolers. Then, get tips on crafting an apology that will avoid making a bad situation worse.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR 89.3

Details are coming from the Kansas budget director this morning after Governor Sam Brownback delivered his State of the State address in Topeka last night. After the speech, KCUR's Statehouse Blend Kansas podcast and the Kansas News Services' Jim McLean sat down with two freshman legislators to get a fresh take on the Governor's speech.

Susie Fagan / KHI News Service

Former Democratic Gov. John Carlin and former Republican House Speaker Mike O’Neal have starkly different views on the condition of Kansas government. That divergence was plain as the two met in Topeka Thursday for a discussion about the size of government recorded for KCUR’s Statehouse Blend Kansas podcast.

 

O’Neal and Carlin agree on one thing -- that they don’t know exactly what the “right size” of state government is.

 

Here comes 2016 and with it, an ever-evolving set of elections that will have many of us hanging onto our seats from January all the way to November. On this edition of Up To Date, the Political Pundits discuss presidential elections, a big U.S. Senate race in Missouri and a governor’s race to boot.

Guests:

Up To Date rounds up its political pundits to discuss presidential and Missouri gubernatorial politics of 2016 and the current standing of Governor Sam Brownback in Kansas. 

Guests:

  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star’s political reporter.
  • Bob Beatty is a professor of political science at Washburn University.
  • Dave Robertson is a professor of political science at the University of Missouri, St. Louis.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback maintains that the revenue enhancement package just adopted in Topeka, which has been described as the largest tax increase in Kansas history, should not be considered a tax increase. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske has a one-on-one with the governor about the 2015 legislative session's contentious tax debate. 

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

Kansas gubernatorial candidate Paul Davis says if elected, he'll surround himself with the most bipartisan cabinet in the state's history.

"I want to try to bring the very best people we can into state government, and that's ultimately going to mean we're going to have roughly equal numbers of Democrats and Republicans," said Davis, a Democrat.

His comments came during an appearance on KCUR's Up to Date with host Steve Kraske on Wednesday.

Johnson County reps before the election in November. Many lost to conservative Republicans. Photo by Laura Ziegler

December 19, 2010 – Politics in Topeka will be whole new ball game when the legislature comes back next year.

There will be a Republican Governor for the first time in 8 years. Both the House and Senate will again have Republican majorities, but with more Tea Party conservatives among them.

Nowhere did the November elections have more of an impact than in Johnson County. The delegation now has one lone Democrat, where it was once a mix of Democrats, and moderate and conservative Republicans.