Kansas City Missouri Police

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

It’s a cloudy afternoon in Kansas City, Kansas. Officer Kevin Terry buckles up in his old, white cop car before heading out to visit a Head Start preschool. He recently met one of the coordinators at a neighborhood association meeting.

“I told her I would stop by today to talk about a possible ‘stranger danger’ lesson she wants to give to her kids,” Terry says.

Kansas City Police Department

Kansas City Police will begin a 90-day test on body cameras this week, joining the growing number of agencies across the country that are using the devices amid increased scrutiny following controversial shootings.

Facebook - KC Mothers in Charge

A day after Kansas City lost two more of its children, family and community members are struggling to comprehend what happened.

Two young boys died after shots were fired into a home near 58th and College early Saturday morning. They were 8 and 9 years old. The other victim, a 16 year-old-girl, is expected to recover. 

Rosilyn Temple is the executive director of KC Mothers In Charge.  She says she arrived at the scene around 2:30 a.m. She was told shots were fired into the house, striking the three victims.

A police perimeter on 77th Terrace near Troost surrounds a house linked to the suspected Baton Rouge shooter.
Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Gavin Eugene Long, the Kansas City man suspected of killing three Baton Rouge law enforcement officers Sunday, projected a number of different identities both virtually and in the real world. 

YouTube videos show him lecturing as a self-styled nutritionist. Self-published books on Amazon delve into an esoteric personal philosophy centered on the values of being an "alpha male." 

And according to documents filed with Jackson County, Long wanted to change his name last year to Cosmo Ausar Setepenra.

The man suspected of killing three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on Sunday morning appears to be from Kansas City, Missouri. Guest host Kyle Palmer brings you the latest from reporters on the ground in Baton Rouge and in Kansas City.

Guests:

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The shootings of Alton Sterling in Louisiana, Philando Castile in Minnesota, and several police officers in Dallas are still fresh in the minds of many across the country. On this edition of Up To Date, we hear from a diverse panel of community members, activists and police about how these tragedies affect us here in Kansas City.

Guests:

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

People in Kansas City are still reeling after a week of violence across the country, and many sought different outlets over the weekend to express their grief and frustration.

Sunday evening, hundreds gathered at the East Patrol Station at 26th and Prospect for a prayer vigil organized by area pastors.

In a crowded gymnasium, Kansas City Police Chief Darryl Forté said that there are changes that need to be made within his own department.

"We've done a lot of things wrong," he said.

KC Police

An audit released this week concludes that with tight budgets and unfilled officer positions, the Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department should re-evaluate its policies on allowing officers to take police vehicles home with them in their off-duty hours.

The police do not agree.

The audit found that 45 percent of the police fleet is assigned for take-home with no tracking of mileage or how they are used after duty hours.

KCK Police

A Kansas City, Kansas, police detective is being remembered Tuesday morning as a loving family man and dedicated public servant.

Nine-year veteran Brad Lancaster was shot and killed Monday afternoon near the Kansas Speedway after responding to a suspicious person report. He was shot multiple times before the suspect fled in Lancaster's unmarked car. Lancaster later underwent surgery at the University of Kansas Hospital but died of his wounds.

KCK Police Chief Terry Zeigler confirmed the news on Twitter Monday. 

A report of shots fired at a police car near 55th and Oak streets started a car chase that ended with a wreck on the other side of the state line.

Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department spokesman Darin Snapp says three or four suspects fired at the patrol car shortly before 11 a.m. Tuesday.

According to a tweet from Chief Darryl Forte, the police vehicle was disabled by gunfire, though no officers were hurt.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Jackson County officials thanked each other Thursday for the successful completion of a project to house Kansas City Police Department detainees on the ground floor of the county detention center.

County Executive Mike Sanders estimates the city will save up to $1 million annually using the Jackson County Detention Center rather than police headquarters to house detainees. The old detention center was in need of costly renovations to comply with American with Disabilities Act accessibility standards.

As protests, riots, community-police tensions and a National Guard presence take hold in St. Louis, on the other side of the state, how is Kansas City doing? Clergy and civil rights leaders have marched to City Hall, and community gatherings have been platforms for candid, cathartic conversations about race.

Guest:

As Kansas City prepared for the spotlight of the World Series, a little girl stepped out of a local convenience store. A car drove by, someone fired shots, and in seconds, six-year old Angel Hooper was dead. In the days since her murder, the Kansas City Police Department has received only two tips in its investigation.

Police say there might be as many as 20 victims in the spree of highway shootings around the Kansas City area.

Captain Tye Grant says since the shootings have been widely publicized, a number of people have come forward who think they may have been involved in a similar incident.

Police are now looking into 20 possible shootings on area highways, but Grant emphasizes the number is extremely fluid.

“Because honestly that is changing so much by the time I give it to you and the time you report it, it’s going to change," says Grant.

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Nearly 50 years ago, the bosses in the Kansas City Police Department were not too keen about a change in the way they were supposed to patrol the streets.

The first helicopters had just arrived, but they were practically unheard of in police work.

Only after the concept worked did it get almost universal approval. The man who prodded and promoted the idea watches from the distance now. But for a brief hour, the innovator went back to the heliport he started.

A guy walks into the helicopter unit

Dan Verbeck / KCUR

A Kansas City law enforcement and community coalition has been formed to attack hate crimes after a recent study found a need for it.

The number of hate crimes in Kansas City has been relatively consistent year after year. But, attempts to eradicate it haven’t worked.

Kansas City’s top FBI agent, Michael Kaste, looked at a bureau study released this week for the nation and region.

The FBI Special Agent In-Charge said 104 hate crimes were reported last year in Missouri.

Kansas City Missouri Police Department

Fall weather brings changes for Officer Nicole Wright as she works her beat for the Kansas City, Mo. Police Department. Kids are back in school, there's Chief's home games to work, but as for October 31, well, as Wright observes, "everyday's Halloween" in East Patrol.

Fabio Pozzebom / Wikimedia

Crime, every community suffers from some kind of it—whether it’s shoplifting a candy bar, defrauding a bank or dealing drugs as a member of a gang.

Kansas City is no stranger to violent crime, in fact Kansas City as of 2011 ranked as the 18th most violent city in the United States, according to FBI statistics. But the science of crime fighting is always changing.

With 61 people indicted last week on weapons and drug charges, Kansas City is making a statement

Danie Alexander / KCUR-FM

When we first met Officer Nicole Wright last December we learned why this Kansas City, Mo. native chose to serve on the force and in the neighborhood where she grew up.  Today Nicole returns to tell us about her first call of a day back in January that turned out to be her last call of the day.