Kansas City CARE Clinic

KCUR

A nonprofit health care clinic originally known for helping hippies in the 1970s has received federal recognition.

The Kansas City CARE Clinic was designated as a Federally Qualified Health Center, or FQHC, on Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The clinic will receive federal funding of $650,000 annually, and KC CARE vice president of marketing and development Kirk Isenhour says that will help the organization expand its capacity to include pediatric care and more services for seniors.

Cody Newill / KCUR

Hundreds of uninsured citizens flooded into Bartle Hall in Kansas City Saturday for one reason: to see a doctor.

The National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics collaborated with KC C.A.R.E. to bring 1,300 doctors, nurses and other volunteers to the city for a one-day free clinic.

The most common ailments doctors saw were high blood pressure, complications due to diabetes and severe dental problems. 

Todd Feeback / Hale Center for Journalism at KCPT

 

A year and a half ago, a local safety-net clinic underwent one of the most significant changes in its more than four decades of serving the metropolitan area: It went from a purely free provider to one that also accepted paying patients covered by insurance.

Known for years as the Kansas City Free Health Clinic, the organization became the Kansas City CARE Clinic to reflect that its donation-based operation had evolved to a fee-based, sliding-scale system with a minimum payment of $10.

Duane Cramer / Duane Cramer Creative

This Friday is National HIV Testing Day, first created almost 20 years ago to encourage members of the public to learn their HIV status. Since then, what it means to be HIV-positive has changed dramatically.

Individuals diagnosed as positive today can expect to live as long as they would without the virus, as long as they receive treatment.

But many HIV patients, especially in African American communities, don't receive the treatment they need, and health advocates blame that on the stigma associated with HIV and AIDS.

A New Era For 'Free' Clinics

Jan 29, 2013
Elana Gordon / KCUR

Armed with more than 100 staff members and 1,000 volunteers, the bustling Kansas City Free Health Clinic in midtown is one of the largest free health clinics in the country, treating upward of 15,000 patients a year. “KC Free,” as it’s commonly called, doesn’t charge fees or bill patients for care. It only sees people who are uninsured.



But this year, all that changes.



More Free Clinics Request Patient Donations

Feb 20, 2012
Elana Gordon / KCUR

Free health clinics have long been caring for people who have no health coverage and limited resources to pay for private care.  That’s why services are free.  Well, mostly.