JCC shooting

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

This story was updated on Wednesday at 9:59 a.m.

Two years after an avowed anti-Semite killed three people outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom, a memorial has been dedicated in their honor.

Artist Jesse Small sculpted the three stainless ripples to represent the three lives cut short on April 13, 2014, at the two Overland Park, Kansas, Jewish sites.

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Updated, 6:05 p.m.:

Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., was sentenced to death Tuesday after emotional testimony from friends and family of three victims killed in shootings at Jewish sites in Johnson County, Kansas, in April 2014.

Johnson County Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan told Cross his attempt to terrorize the community had failed and sided with a jury that recommended Cross be sentenced to death in August.

"I can't say anything more profound than what was said here today," Ryan told the courtroom.

Cody Newill / KCUR

Several dozen volunteers helped finish up the Blue Valley Middle School Outdoor Learning Center Saturday in memory of two of the victims of the shootings at Jewish community sites in Johnson County.

Allison Long / POOL/Kansas City Star

Convicted Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. wants a new trial.

He filed a motion Wednesday demanding a retrial for a variety of reasons, most of which stemmed from Cross’ decision to represent himself.

Cross argues he did not have adequate help from the three defense attorneys appointed to serve as standby counsel.

Allison Long / POOL/The Kansas City Star

Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. has been sentenced to death for killing three people last spring at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom.

The jury agreed that the shooting deaths of William Corporon, Reat Underwood and Terri LaManno qualified as a heinous crime for which  life in prison would be insufficient punishment.

Cross, who represented himself, had to be removed from the courtroom after launching into yet another anti-Semitic tirade.

In April of 2014, an avowed Anti-Semite opened fire on Jewish sites in Overland Park, Kan., killing three people, believing they were Jewish. Now, a disturbing trial has just reached its conclusion. Rabbis respond with ethical, spiritual and historical perspectives.

Guests:

Joe Ledford / POOL/Kansas City Star

A Johnson County jury will be back Tuesday to decide if convicted killer Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. will be sentenced to death for shooting three people last year.

Rather than risk having to sequester the jury over the holiday weekend, Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan dismissed them a little before 10 a.m. Friday, telling them to come back fresh next week.

Both prosecutors and Cross, who is representing himself, agreed it would be best to wait to send the case to the jury.

Joe Ledford / POOL/Kansas City Star

A judge told convicted Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. Thursday he could not call two defense attorneys as witnesses during the penalty phase of his trial.

Cross, who is representing himself, is trying to convince the jury he deserves life in prison for the murders of Reat Underwood, William Corporon and Terri LaManno in April 2014. Cross had asked Ron Wurtz and Val Wachtel, two Kansas attorneys with experience litigating death penalty cases, to testify on his behalf.

Convicted Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. is expected to present evidence all week that he says will explain his actions on April 13, 2014.

The same Johnson County jury that found Cross guilty of capital murder in the deaths of William Corporon, Reat Underwood and Terri LaManno on Monday will consider whether Cross should get the death penalty or life in prison.

Allison Long / POOL/Kansas City Star

Updated: 4:17 p.m.  

A Johnson County jury has found Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. guilty of all charges in the shooting deaths of three people at Overland Park Jewish sites.

Cross was charged with a single count of capital murder, three counts of first degree attempted murder, one count of aggravated assault and one count of criminal discharge of a firearm at a building.

After hearing the first verdict, Cross said, "I think the fat lady just sang," and then yelled, "Sieg heil!"

Original story begins here:

Joe Ledford / POOL/Kansas City Star

Updated, 4:25 p.m. Friday:

The trial for accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. will enter a second week.

Cross took the stand Friday to present his case, which included a long-winded rant about a Jewish plot to end the white race and a detailed retelling of what happened in the Jewish Community Center parking lot on April 13, 2014.

POOL/Joe Ledford / The Kansas City Star

Updated, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday: The avowed anti-Semite accused of killing three people in a shooting spree last year will get an extra half-day to prepare his defense.

Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., who is representing himself, has been granted a continuance after a lengthy back-and-forth with the judge.

Cross has said repeatedly he wants to explain “what caused me, a retired Army sergeant living a great life, to do what I did” to the jury.

Joe Ledford / POOL/Kansas City Star

Accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. had just one question for the state’s firearms expert, who testified for more than an hour.

“What are the chances I’m going to get those guns back when I’m exonerated?” Cross asked David Wright, a supervisor at the Johnson County Crime Lab.

An exasperated Chris McMullin, the deputy prosecutor, objected at once.

On the second day of the accused Jewish Community Center shooter’s trial, Maggie Hunker told the jury she stared down the barrel of Frazier Glenn Cross Jr.’s gun and lived to tell the tale.

Hunker testified she had just finished lunch with a friend at the Village Shalom retirement home when she watched Cross gun down Terri LaManno in the parking lot.

“She was screaming, ‘No, no, no!’” said Hunker.

Hunker said at first, she was too stunned by what was happening to be scared. She said after she saw Cross shoot LaManno, he turned to her and asked, “Are you a Jew?”

Shane Keyser/ / POOL / Kansas City Star

Assistant District Attorney Christopher McMullin opened the trial of accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. Monday with a quote from the defendant shortly after his arrest.

"'I'm an anti-Semite,'" McMullin repeated, voice booming across the courtroom. "'How many goddamn Jews did I kill?' These are words captured on video as the defendant sat in the backseat of an Overland Park police car minutes after he killed three people."

Elle Moxley / KCUR

A jury has been selected in the trial of Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. who is accused of killing three people at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kansas on April 13, 2014.

The jury selection, which began last Monday, narrowed a pool of 200 down to 17 jurors on Friday. The jury is made up of eight women and nine men – five of which are alternates.

Just one potential juror was dismissed Tuesday morning from serving in the trial of the accused Jewish Community Center shooter, Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., because of opposition to the death penalty.

Cross faces a single count of capital murder for the deaths last spring of William Corporon, Reat Underwood and Terri LaManno. The trial, expected to start next week, will likely stretch into September.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Jury selection began Monday in the trial of accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr.

Cross, who also uses the surname Miller, appeared in court wearing a suit and a Confederate flag tie. He asked the prosecutor, seated closer to the jury box, if he'd be willing to switch seats.

Courtesy photo / Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

A Johnson County judge agreed Thursday to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. represent himself in court, a decision that could have far-reaching implications as the state pursues its capital case.

Cross, a known anti-Semite who has bragged to the media about killing three people last spring at two Overland Park Jewish sites, has repeatedly told Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan he doesn't trust his lawyers and wants them fired.

Courtesy photo / Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 11:16 a.m.:

After a weighty silence, a Johnson County District Court judge agreed to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. defend himself. 

His attorneys - Martin Warhurst, Mark Manna and Jeffrey Dazey - will stay on as "standby counsel" in what may be the first capital case in Kansas where the defendant represents himself. 

"Do you understand, sir, at trial, you're going to be held to the same standard as an attorney?" Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan asked Cross. 

Courtesy photo / Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Lawyers for accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. want the state to strike evidence found in his car and suppress the statements of four witnesses who say they saw him carry out the attacks on April 13, 2014.

Though Cross, a known anti-Semite who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, has boasted in interviews he committed the murders at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom, the motions his lawyers filed last week indicate they'll mount an aggressive defense.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

When Sister Berta Sailor called Kansas City Mayor Sly James' cell phone a couple of weeks ago, he picked up.

The director of the child care and social service agency Operation Breakthrough told the mayor some of her patrons wanted to participate in events marking the one year anniversary of the shootings at Jewish sites in Overland Park — but there was a problem. The march and candlelight vigil were to start at the Jewish Community Center, and she didn’t have a way to get her people there.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Mindy Corporon and her husband, Len Losen, watched as thousands of people began a walk from the Jewish Community Center to the Church of the Resurrection in Overland Park, Kansas, Monday night.

It's been a year since Reat Underwood, 14; William Corporon, 69; and Terri LaManno, 53; died in the shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom. 

And tomorrow, Corporon will look onward, the theme for the walk and the last of the SevenDays events planned in honor of her late son and father.

But not yet. Not tonight.

April 13 will mark one year since Frazier Glenn Cross, Jr. is alleged to have made his way to two Jewish sites in Overland Park and opened fire, killing three people. As we approach the anniversary of the shootings, Up To Date visits with Jewish leaders in Kansas City about the changes —both tangible and intangible— they've felt in their community.

Guests:

Photo courtesy Mindy Corporon


It's been almost a year since three people were gunned down outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kansas. The avowed anti-Semite accused of killing William Corporon, 69; Reat Underwood, 14; and Terri LaManno, 53; on April 13, 2014, will face capital murder charges at a trial this summer.

Courtesy photo / Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 5:35 p.m.:

Attorneys representing the man accused of killing three people outside two Overland Park, Kansas, Jewish sites last year told a Johnson County judge Friday they'll need more than 150 days to prepare his defense.

But Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. disagreed, arguing he'd stand trial in 30 days if Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan would allow it.

"I asked about a speedy trial months ago," Cross complained to Ryan.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Nearly a year ago, three people were shot and killed outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kan. The only suspect, former Ku Klux Klan member Frazier Glenn Cross, was known by authorities to harbor anti-Semitic beliefs. 

Johnson County District Attorney

The man accused of killing three people last spring at two Overland Park, Kan., Jewish sites has two names.

There's the name he was born with, Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., which he used to build a following of like-minded anti-Semites and radical extremists in the 1980s.

And then there's the name he was given after turning state's evidence, Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., which remains his legal name.

Updated, 2:35 p.m. Monday:

An eyewitness to the shootings last spring at Overland Park, Kan., Jewish sites told a Johnson County judge Monday she feared for her life when the defendant asked if she was a Jew.

"I knew if I gave the wrong answer, he would shoot me," Maggie Hunker testified.

Hunker had just finished eating lunch with a friend at Village Shalom on April 13, 2014, when she saw a man gun down a woman in the retirement home's parking lot.

That woman was later identified as Terri LaManno.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

When national news editors review the top stories of 2014, Ebola, Isis and the World Cup might top the list.

But when we talk to editors of some hyper-local Kansas City papers, very different stories emerge.

Joe Jarosz, managing editor, Northeast News:

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