JCC shooting

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

A Johnson County judge agreed Thursday to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. represent himself in court, a decision that could have far-reaching implications as the state pursues its capital case.

Cross, a known anti-Semite who has bragged to the media about killing three people last spring at two Overland Park Jewish sites, has repeatedly told Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan he doesn't trust his lawyers and wants them fired.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 11:16 a.m.:

After a weighty silence, a Johnson County District Court judge agreed to let accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. defend himself. 

His attorneys - Martin Warhurst, Mark Manna and Jeffrey Dazey - will stay on as "standby counsel" in what may be the first capital case in Kansas where the defendant represents himself. 

"Do you understand, sir, at trial, you're going to be held to the same standard as an attorney?" Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan asked Cross. 

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Lawyers for accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. want the state to strike evidence found in his car and suppress the statements of four witnesses who say they saw him carry out the attacks on April 13, 2014.

Though Cross, a known anti-Semite who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, has boasted in interviews he committed the murders at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom, the motions his lawyers filed last week indicate they'll mount an aggressive defense.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

When Sister Berta Sailor called Kansas City Mayor Sly James' cell phone a couple of weeks ago, he picked up.

The director of the child care and social service agency Operation Breakthrough told the mayor some of her patrons wanted to participate in events marking the one year anniversary of the shootings at Jewish sites in Overland Park — but there was a problem. The march and candlelight vigil were to start at the Jewish Community Center, and she didn’t have a way to get her people there.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Mindy Corporon and her husband, Len Losen, watched as thousands of people began a walk from the Jewish Community Center to the Church of the Resurrection in Overland Park, Kansas, Monday night.

It's been a year since Reat Underwood, 14; William Corporon, 69; and Terri LaManno, 53; died in the shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom. 

And tomorrow, Corporon will look onward, the theme for the walk and the last of the SevenDays events planned in honor of her late son and father.

But not yet. Not tonight.

April 13 will mark one year since Frazier Glenn Cross, Jr. is alleged to have made his way to two Jewish sites in Overland Park and opened fire, killing three people. As we approach the anniversary of the shootings, Up To Date visits with Jewish leaders in Kansas City about the changes —both tangible and intangible— they've felt in their community.

Guests:

Photo courtesy Mindy Corporon


It's been almost a year since three people were gunned down outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kansas. The avowed anti-Semite accused of killing William Corporon, 69; Reat Underwood, 14; and Terri LaManno, 53; on April 13, 2014, will face capital murder charges at a trial this summer.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

Update, 5:35 p.m.:

Attorneys representing the man accused of killing three people outside two Overland Park, Kansas, Jewish sites last year told a Johnson County judge Friday they'll need more than 150 days to prepare his defense.

But Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. disagreed, arguing he'd stand trial in 30 days if Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan would allow it.

"I asked about a speedy trial months ago," Cross complained to Ryan.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Nearly a year ago, three people were shot and killed outside the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom in Overland Park, Kan. The only suspect, former Ku Klux Klan member Frazier Glenn Cross, was known by authorities to harbor anti-Semitic beliefs. 

Johnson County District Attorney

The man accused of killing three people last spring at two Overland Park, Kan., Jewish sites has two names.

There's the name he was born with, Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., which he used to build a following of like-minded anti-Semites and radical extremists in the 1980s.

And then there's the name he was given after turning state's evidence, Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., which remains his legal name.

Updated, 2:35 p.m. Monday:

An eyewitness to the shootings last spring at Overland Park, Kan., Jewish sites told a Johnson County judge Monday she feared for her life when the defendant asked if she was a Jew.

"I knew if I gave the wrong answer, he would shoot me," Maggie Hunker testified.

Hunker had just finished eating lunch with a friend at Village Shalom on April 13, 2014, when she saw a man gun down a woman in the retirement home's parking lot.

That woman was later identified as Terri LaManno.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

When national news editors review the top stories of 2014, Ebola, Isis and the World Cup might top the list.

But when we talk to editors of some hyper-local Kansas City papers, very different stories emerge.

Joe Jarosz, managing editor, Northeast News:

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

Updated, 4 p.m. Wednesday:

The families of the three people killed near Jewish facilities in Overland Park, Kan., in April are planning a week-long community event to memorialize their loved ones.

Mindy Corporon, whose father and son were killed in the shooting, says the families wanted to make the announcement Wednesday to coincide with the preliminary hearing of accused murderer Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., which was postponed earlier in the day.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Jewish organizations in the Kansas City area spent Friday learning what to do if ever again faced with a threat like the shootings last month that left three people dead.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Kansas City organized the workshop, during which about 150 people received safety training from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and local law enforcement.

Courtesy photo / Johnson County Sheriff's Office

Prosecutors have charged the neo-Nazi accused of killing three people at Jewish facilities in Overland Park, Kan., last month with several more felonies.

The Johnson County District Attorney’s office says Frazier Glenn Miller shot at and tried to kill three additional people, endangered a fourth and fired into the Jewish Community Center knowing there were people inside.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

In the weeks since a gunman shot and killed three people at Jewish facilities in Overland Park, Kan., hundreds of cards, letters and other expressions of sympathy have poured in.

Jacob Schreiber, President and CEO of the Jewish Community Center said a number of the written expressions are displayed on a bulletin board in the center’s lobby. Some of the expressions of sympathy include:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

In the wake of shootings that took the lives of three people April 13 at Jewish facilities in Johnson County, Kan., we have been wondering about what constitutes a hate crime and how that differs from acts of terrorism.

On the KCUR program Central Standard,  host Gina Kaufmann explored the differences with professors Jessica Hodge and Steve Dilks from the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Creative Commons

In the aftermath of the shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom on April 13, a suspect has been charged with murder and hate crime charges will likely be filed against him.

As that question looms, Central Standard inquires into the nature of the word hate — its psychological underpinnings, as well as the definition of hate crime in our legal code. 

Guests:

The mayor of a small town in the Ozarks has resigned after making racist comments and revealing he was once friends with the man accused of killing three people at two Jewish facilities in Overland Park, Kan., on April 13.

Ozarks Public Radio reports that Marionville Mayor Dan Clevenger said he would resign Monday after four of five aldermen voted to impeach him. 

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

A diverse crowd linked arms in Overland Park, Kan., on Thursday to remember the three victims of an attack on a Jewish community center and retirement home.

Clergy representing many faiths, politicians of different stripes and more than 1,300 people from the community united to condemn shootings during the memorial service.

The service took place at the Jewish Community Center, where two of three victims died on Sunday.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said the whole country was standing with Overland Park.

Dr. William Lewis Corporon, 69, was taking his grandson Reat Underwood, 14, to a singing audition at the Jewish Community Center when both were fatally shot Sunday afternoon.

Corporon and his wife of 49 years, Melinda, moved to Johnson County, Kan., in 2003 to be closer to his family. Before that, he practiced family medicine in Oklahoma for more than 25 years.  He continued to see patients in the Kansas City area.

courtesy of the LaManno family

At 10 a.m. on Thursday morning at two locations in the metro area, Kansas Citians will gather to pay their respects to Terri LaManno, the third victim killed in Sunday's Overland Park, Kan., shooting.

St. Peter's Catholic Church in Kansas City, Mo., will host a Mass of Christian Burial for Terri LaManno.

LaManno will also be honored at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City in Overland Park.

But thoughts of Terri LaManno have been stirring in Amanda Daniels' mind all week.

Laura Ziegler

Parents pulled into the circle in front of the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., at a steady pace to drop off their prechoolers at the Child Development Center Wednesday.

It was the first day the center was open since a gunman took the lives of William Corporon, 69, and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, in the parking lot before killing Terri LaManno, 53, at a retirement community down the road. 

The only reminder of the horrific event were several police cars lining the driveway and a handful of law enforcement officers inside the building.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

The 73-year old southwest Missouri man suspected in the killings of three people near the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., made his first court appearance Tuesday, wearing a bullet-proof vest and looking confused as a Johnson County judge set his bail at $10 million.

Frazier Glenn Cross was charged with two felony counts of murder -- one count of capital murder and one count of premeditated first-degree murder -- for the killings of three people in two locations.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

Blue Valley High School, at 159th and Nall in Stilwell, Kan., was closed earlier this week for a previously scheduled professional development day. Still, counseling support was available for staff and students in the wake of Sunday's shootings that killed three people, including a Blue Valley student and his grandfather.

courtesy: Johnson County Sheriff's Office

The man suspected of killing three people at two Jewish facilities in Johnson County, Kan., is a well-known neo-Nazi and someone who authorities say spent much of his life calling for attacks on Jews.

Frazier Glenn Cross, Jr. faces state murder charges and likely hate crime charges in federal court, after allegedly murdering three people in shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom assisted living center in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The day after a harrowing series of shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom, Central Standard convenes community leaders to take the first steps toward healing and understanding. Do we find answers in spirituality? Ethics? Shared humanity and friendship? Tune in for this half-hour segment to hear how Kansas City's communities are responding to a tragic act of targeted violence.

Guests:

KCUR

Sunday’s shootings at Jewish centers in Johnson County raise a lot of questions for law enforcement and the victims’ families.  

But as the news continues to pick up more local, national and even international attention,  the shootings may prompt questions from little ones.

We want to know how you’re explaining the recent shootings to them.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Communities in the Kansas City metropolitan area are in shocked mourning after multiple shootings left three people dead Sunday afternoon.

On Monday's Up to Date, we talk with a local man who was at the Jewish Community Center when two people were shot about what it was like to be in the lockdown there. We also check in with KCUR's Laura Ziegler to get the latest on the alleged shooter and talk with a local pastor about how the community is responding to the deaths.

Guests:

Laura Spencer / KCUR

Shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom retirement home in Overland Park, Kan. became international news overnight as new details about the tragedy emerged.

Authorities have been learning about the racist and anti-Semitic ideology of the suspect, Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., who hate-group trackers have been following for years.

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