infrastructure | KCUR

infrastructure

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Kansas received a passing grade for its highways earlier this week when the state’s chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers released its latest “infrastructure report card.” However, the engineers also warned that sweeping cuts to Kansas Department of Transportation funding are still causing roadways to suffer.

The Community - PopCulture Geek

Segment 1: Recent development projects will see some of downtown Kansas City's iconic buildings updated.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KCUR 89.3

A bikeway along Paseo Boulevard would improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists, but even with a federal grant, Kansas City is short on funds.

The Public Works Department is considering two different designs for the bikeway, said spokeswoman Beth Breitenstein.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

High poverty rates, aging infrastructure and vacant homes.

These are problems that commonly occur together and that discourage community revitilization.

The Marlborough Community Coalition in south Kansas City, five neighborhoods come together as one, is trying to do things differently.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Singing "freedom is coming soon," members of the Paseo Academy choir serenaded a small crowd at the Spirit of Freedom fountain Tuesday morning. 

"There’s two things for me that signify springtime. One is opening day for the Royals, and the other is turning on the fountains in Kansas City," said Kansas City Parks and Recreation board commissioner Allen Dillingham.

Edgemoor Infrastructure & Real Estate

The timeline for a new single terminal at Kansas City International airport has been slightly delayed because airport officials have determined it needs more gates than originally planned. 

KC Pet Project

Kansas City’s over-crowded animal shelter is a step closer to becoming a state-of-the-art animal “campus.”

Kansas City's Finance and Governance committee advanced an ordinance Wednesday to begin design and construction for the new animal facility.

The $26 million dollar project is partially funded with $18 million in GO KC bonds from the city. Voters approved the $800 million infrastructure bond package last year.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Last year was a busy one for elections in Kansas City, Missouri.

Between approving a new airport terminal, deciding the future of a streetcar extension, and agreeing to property tax hikes for a 20-year, $800 million infrastructure package, Kansas City voters made some big decisions about the city's future.

Next week's election is much more low-key. On Tuesday, voters will be asked to renew a one percent sales tax for 20 years to fund capital improvements across the city.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Coming off of a weekend where gun violence dominated headlines, Mayor Sly James didn't shy away from the topic at his seventh "State of the City" address Tuesday at Westport's Plexpod.

James touted the city's progress on infrastructure over the past year, including groundbreakings for both the new airport and new convention hotel and plans for a new Buck O'Neil Bridge underway.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Kansas City playwright uses murders of Leon Jordan and James Townsend as inspiration to connect 1960s civil rights movements to today's.

In the long history of Kansas City's Green Duck Lounge, two of its owners, both considered icons in the community, were each was shot dead, one in 1970 and the other in 2015. The murders are the basis for a new work, which couples the civil rights activities of the 60s to those of today.

file photo

President Donald Trump unveiled a $1.5 trillion infrastructure proposal on Monday built on plans that would more heavily rely on state and local dollars being matched with money from Washington.

For Kansas, that poses both challenges and opportunities. The state is short on funding for new construction work, but it’s already begun looking at other options to pay for roads, bridges and the like.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Over the last 12 months, we've had any number of pollsters, pundits and politicos on the program to discuss Pres. Donald Trump's words and actions.

ataelw / Flickr - CC

In August, Kansas City voters made any future streetcar expansions a little more complicated. Nevertheless, the Streetcar AuthorityKCATA and Port KC are convinced they can come up with $32 million to extend service from River Market to Berkley Riverfront Park.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Local governments and school boards are worried about the possible effects on infrastructure and other projects if Congress passes a tax bill that eliminates exemptions for certain refinancing of bonds.

The Kansas Association of School Boards, which includes most of the state’s 286 boards of education, is urging its members to contact Sens. Jerry Moran and Pat Roberts — both Kansas Republicans — about voting against the bill.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

After years of back and forth and deal-making, a complicated (some would say bungled) procurement process, complete with ethics complaints and calls for a do-over, Kansas City, Missouri, voters have approved a plan to build a new, single terminal at Kansas City International Airport.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Take me out to the ball game . . . or not? Salina, Kansas is home to one of the worst professional baseball teams in the country. Why the Salina Stockade team is still proud. 

Plus, the Buck O'Neil Bridge is reaching the end of its projected lifespan. What does the future hold?

Guests:

In the wake of Charlottesville, and growing visibility of extremist groups like white supremacists and neo-Nazis, we ask, what does it mean to be white? 

Plus, with unprecedented flooding in Houston, we take a moment to see how prepared Kansas City is for heavy rainfall. 

Guests:

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Missouri Department of Transportation engineers are warning policymakers that inadequate infrastructure funding could close bridges and snarl traffic in the Kansas City area.

“If a road degrades slightly, you can still drive on it. If a bridge is weight-posted, you can’t drive a heavy load on it,” says MoDOT Director Patrick McKenna. “That really disconnects communities all across the state.”

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

After weeks of back and forth and lively discussion about what constitutes a "shovel-ready" project, the Kansas City Council on Thursday approved the first round of projects it will address with money from a massive, $800 million infrastructure bond package approved by voters in April. 

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

Monday's bombing in Manchester, England, shows the global war on terrorism has been unsuccessful thus far in stopping extremist violence. Today, former Department of State advisor Steven Koltai suggests a new approach to stopping the bloodshed: encouraging entrepreneurship.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

There's a new proposal from architecture firm Burns & McDonnell that would use private money to fund construction of a new terminal to replace existing facilities at Kansas City International Airport.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

City leaders say Kansas City can get a new, single-terminal airport at no risk to taxpayers. Burns & McDonnell, one of Kansas City’s big engineering firms, is offering to take on the project at Kansas City International Airport — not just the design but the financing as well. 

Kansas City Mayor Sly James says the deal would leave the city completely out of the project’s funding.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

City Manager Troy Schulte has sent a letter to the mayor and city council outlining how to spend the first $40 million in general obligation bonds Kansas City voters approved last month.

“We want to get the shovel-ready projects rolling, and we have to tackle the backlog of spot sidewalk repairs,” Schulte said in a statement. “I know council members are also anxious to get going, so this gives them a chance to review the list and provide us with the feedback we need to finalize the plan.”

Here’s what the city manager has proposed:

If you’ve recently driven through Kansas City’s Marlborough neighborhood, which borders from Troost Avenue on the west, Prospect Avenue on the east, and from E. 79th Street to E. 85th Street, you may have noticed that the streets are a little cleaner these days.

That's thanks to Kansas City’s pilot Trash Cart Program, a green infrastructure project where residents are given new covered garbage and recycling bins.

The program rolled out last April in Kansas City’s Marlborough neighborhood as part of the city’s development of green infrastructure projects.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From attempts to overturn Obamacare to rumors of sweeping tax reform, there's plenty going on in the federal Capitol these days — not to mention the White House. Today, Democrat Emanuel Cleaver, of Missouri, and Kansas' Republican Kevin Yoder, both U.S. representatives, discuss the issues congress is grappling with now and will likely deal with in the near future. They also share their thoughts on President Donald Trump's first 88 days in office.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

When it comes to the Buck O’Neil Bridge (formerly known as the Broadway Bridge,) Kansas City is in a tough spot.

More than 50,000 people drive across the bridge each day, according to The Mid-America Regional Council, whose Beyond The Loop project is studying the bridge and its surrounding area.  

Jim Mathis / Johnson County Library

Kansas City, Missouri, voters approved a series of general obligation bonds aimed at improving infrastructure throughout the metro, and totaling more than $800 million. Today, Councilman Quinton Lucas tells us how he expects the investments to affect local communities. Then, public libraries may be facing cuts at both federal and state levels. We speak with local library directors to find out how they are faring in an era of "skinny budgets."

KC Pet Project

Kansas City residents handed city officials a big victory Tuesday night when they approved an $800 million bond package and property tax increase to address the city's infrastructure needs. 

City officials are eager to get to work. City Manager Troy Schulte says his team has already been developing a first-year implementation plan for the first tranche, or portion, of the money. He says he plans to deliver a final version of that plan to the city council by May 1. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For all the times that scientific research has improved our lives, there are other times when science got it horribly wrong. Today, Dr. Paul Offit describes the lessons we have learned, and should be learning, to separate good science from bad.

Better Block Foundation

The push for safe spaces and trigger warnings is leading many educators to more carefully curate their syllabi. The issue inspired creativity in a Kansas City playwright and the two local actors performing in his new project.

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