history

Central Standard
4:22 pm
Tue December 9, 2014

Conflict On Camera

This photograph, Italian Sentry, is included in the War & Art exhibition at the World War I Museum in Kansas City.
Credit Istituto per la storia del Risorgimento Italiano, Rome

President Obama's recent call for police body cameras raises questions about documenting truth. An art curator, a war historian and a police major discuss. 

Guests:

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Talk Show
4:21 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

Modern Historic Irish Pageantry

After gaining independence, the people of Ireland used pageantry to express their heritage. These thematic recreations of historical and mythical events were subversive acts of forging a new national identity. In All Dressed Up: Modern Irish Historical Pageantry, Joan Dean explores the public imagination of history.

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Up To Date
1:21 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Capturing Voices: Preserving Personal Stories

Credit diy.storycorps.org/learn-more/

The holidays bring good food, lots of family, and fascinating tales. When families unite, storytelling takes center stage as we recall childhood memories and the ups and downs of life. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a personal historian and StoryCorps' David Isay about the process and significance of preserving family stories in preparation for the National Day of Listening

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Up to Date
10:58 am
Wed November 19, 2014

Examining The Power And Scandal Of Nelson Rockefeller

Richard Norton Smith is the author of 'On his Own Terms.'

Gerald Ford bumped Nelson Rockefeller off the 1976 presidential ticket. Two years later, the colorful four-term governor of New York managed to create scandalous headlines with the circumstances of his death.

On this broadcast of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and historian Richard Norton Smithe delve into the life and times of the former vice-president. They discuss his rise to political prominence and his rocky, but unapologetic, personal life.

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Central Standard
4:27 pm
Fri November 14, 2014

Painter Hung Liu Summons Ghosts From China's Past

Hung Liu stands in front of Mu Nu, Mother Daughter, a painting the permanent collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.
Credit Paul Andrews

Back-breaking labor makes people colorless.

That's how artist Hung Liu remembers it, anyway. At the age of 16, she was sent to the Chinese countryside to live and work without a wage as part of Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution. High school had filled her head with too much non-proletarian knowledge; she would have to unlearn it all through hard labor. 

"Working in the cornfield, you sweat. In the morning, you pull the wheat with mud all over your hands. We were colorless," Liu says.

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History
12:58 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

The Story Behind The Historic American Indian Cemetery In Downtown KCK

The sign leading up to the driveway of the Huron Indian Cemetery, formally known as the Wyandot National Burying Ground.
Credit Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

Right in the center of downtown Kansas City, Kan., between the public library and government buildings just off Minnesota Avenue, is a little two-acre cemetery.

The sign reads "Huron Indian Cemetery," but it’s also known as the Wyandot National Burying Ground. Over the years this place has been a gathering spot and a sacred place for members of the Wyandot Nation, but it has also been the site of controversy, confusion and a curse.

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Up To Date
2:47 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Historian David McCullough: "Look At Your Fish"

Credit Brett Weinstein / Wikimedia Commons

When it comes to the telling of the American story, historian David McCullough has few peers. In a book-writing career spanning 46 years, McCullough has chronicled the lives of Harry Truman, Theodore Roosevelt and John Adams. He wrote about the devastation of the Jonestown Flood and the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Panama Canal.

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Central Standard
1:30 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Why Jazz Fans In Denmark Feel A Connection To Kansas City

Was Kansas City-born Ben Webster "king of the tenors" as this album title suggests?
Credit mohaoffbeat.blogspot.com / Creative Commons

Ben Webster hated to fly on airplanes.

When he went to Europe to perform for his fans across the Atlantic, the trip was one-way. 

A contemporary of Charlie Parker, Webster grew up in Kansas City, Mo., right off of 24th Street. He taught himself to play the piano at a young age, and started his career performing as a pianist for silent films. It wasn't until he was about 20 years old that he took up the saxophone.

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Up To Date
12:31 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

A Century Of Union Station

A few decades ago, Union Station was a bustling train hub, but then people started traveling by air and the station fell into disuse and disrepair. Kansas City's grand old train station turned one hundred this year. In this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske discusses the history of the station, how a flood changed its story and the miracle of its survival. 

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Up To Date
9:00 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Women Spied For Both Sides During Civil War

Karen Abbott is the author of 'Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War.'

Behind the front lines of the Civil War, a world of spies lurked, full of cloak, dagger and... petticoats?

On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk about the true stories of four women who became spies-- some for the North and some for the South.

Guest:

  • Karen Abbott, author of Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War
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Up to Date
11:08 am
Wed September 3, 2014

8 Fall Festivals To Add To Your Weekends

Fall festivals all over the Kansas City area share themes of harvest, food and fun.
Credit City of Lenexa / Facebook

Fall festival season is upon us, and the Kansas City area is gearing up for a busy couple of months. We've gathered up a few of the many celebrations that focus on local history and harvest time.

Lenexa Spinach Festival, Sept. 6 at Sar-Ko-Par Trails Park in Lenexa, Kan.
History exhibits, craft fair, massive spinach salad, cooking demos

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Central Standard
12:55 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

German-Americans In Missouri During World War I

When war broke out in Europe a century ago, more than one in 10 Missourians was German-American. On this episode we talk about the experiences of Missouri’s German-Americans in World War I.

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Central Standard
12:32 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

In Angola Prison, KU Researcher Found Music, Stories And Pain

Daniel Atkinson's doctoral research took him inside the walls of the Louisiana State Penitentiary.
Credit University of Kansas

Ethnomusicologist Daniel Atkinson describes Louisiana State Penitentiary (commonly called "Angola") as a “living, breathing plantation.” The land where the prison stands today was converted from plantation to penitentiary after slavery was abolished. 

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Up to Date
2:00 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

How Elephants Helped Win World War II

Vicki Constantine Croke is the author of Elephant Company.

  Tanks and ammo certainly played a big part in winning World War II, but the Pacific theater had another large asset—elephants.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk about the man who led these animals against the Axis powers and the bond he developed with these surprisingly gentle giants.

Guest:

Vicki Constantine Croke, author of Elephant Company

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Up To Date
12:56 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Two Hundred Years Of U.S. Presidents And Pop Culture

Credit Regnery History

Presidents have been forced to calculate whether they want to be men of the people...or men of somewhat higher understanding.

On this edition of Up to Date Steve Kraske sits down with author Tevi Troy for a look at how popular culture has shaped the presidency. From Jefferson’s grounding in philosophy to Obama’s mastery of Internet culture, they examine who was best, or worst, at navigating a president's need to connect with the average citizen through the culture of the day.

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Up To Date
4:39 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

History And Future of Kansas City Scottish Rite Temple

Kansas City Scottish Rite Building located at the intersection of Paseo and Linwood Boulevard.
Credit Mlaaker / Flickr-CC

When you think of the Masons, images of secret societies and rituals may come to mind—but what about their architecture?

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Thu July 3, 2014

For 200 Years, That Star-Spangled Banner Does Still Wave

The Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired the lyrics to our national anthem, is on display at The Smithsonian in Washington, DC.
Credit National Museum of American History

Kansas Citians - or at least Chiefs fans - may have our own take on the closing line of the national anthem, but this Independence Day we can join the rest of America to celebrate the song's 200th anniversary. That's right: it's been two centuries since Francis Scott Key first commemorated the symbol of the home of the brave

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Central Standard
4:49 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Historic Dividing Lines In Public Education Still Affect Kansas And Missouri Schools

US Marshalls escort Ruby Bridges to and from school in New Orleans in 1960.
Credit CC Public Domain

  

This spring marked the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, a Kansas case that went to the Supreme Court and ultimately ended with the ruling that the segregation of schools was unconstitutional. In the first half of Tuesday's Central Standard, we shared some little-known stories of the desegregation process from the months and years that followed.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Thu June 19, 2014

The Battle Of Westport 150 Years Later

Mural of the Battle of Westport
Credit Newell Convers Wyeth / Missouri State Capitol

In October of 1864, Kansas City played host to a dramatic clash of Union and Confederate forces. Thousands of troops squared off along Brush Creek and Blue River in the Battle of Westport, the largest Civil War battle west of the Mississippi River. On Thursday's Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with preservationist Daniel Smith about the legacy of the "Gettysburg of the West."

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Dr. Mary Frances Berry: The Legacy Of Sixties Activism

Credit maryfrancesberry.com

For four decades, Mary Frances Berry has been a civil rights activist. Famously fired from the US Civil Rights Commission before being rehired by President Reagan, she’s gone on to chair the commission, serve as the first woman and African American to be chancellor of the University of Colorado, and teach legal history at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Jeff Shaara Is Back With Third Civil War Novel

Credit www.randomhouse.com

Bestselling author Jeff Shaara is renowned for his gritty depiction of Civil War battles. His fictionalized accounts of the historical events have appeared in previous works and he returns with his latest offering, The Smoke at Dawn. On Tuesday's Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with the author about how he fleshes out the known facts and in doing so creates a detailed account of the War Between the States.

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Central Standard
4:59 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

The History of Recent Political Conventions

Ronald Reagan on the podium with Gerald Ford at the 1976 Republican National Convention in Kansas City after narrowly losing the presidential nomination.
Credit Executive Office of the President of the United States

Kansas City is getting the once-over this week from members of the Republican National Committee, who are in town to see whether we have what it takes to host the party’s 2016 national convention.

The last convention here came in 1976, and it was a hummer: A candidate named Ronald Reagan was taking on the incumbent president, Gerald Ford, and the battle went down to convention week.

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Beyond Our Borders
4:01 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

How One Kansas City Neighborhood Opened Doors, And The Leaders Who Called It Home

Google Street View shot of Sheraton Estates, a neighborhood on the east side of Kansas City, Mo., has been home to many influential African-Americans in the community.
maps.google.com

Sheraton Estates was the first place in Kansas City, Mo., where African-Americans sought out to build new homes south of 27th Street. The suburban-style subdivision was built in 1957. It was marketed to, and, historically, home to many influential African-American leaders in the city.

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Central Standard
1:12 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Mother's Day: A Radical History, Plus Kansas Citians' Stories

Flowers are a nice gesture on Mother's Day, but there's more to this holiday than meets the eye.
Credit julie / Flickr, Creative Commons

You could be forgiven if you happen to believe that Mother's Day is a holiday invented by florists, candy stores and greeting card companies. In point of fact, however, this holiday has a hard-won, grassroots history that puts today's celebrations in context.

On Central Standard, a historian introduced us to three women who lobbied for a mother's day of sorts: the first out of a desire for peace, the second to decrease infant mortality through education, and the third in service of her own professional yearnings.

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Up To Date
9:00 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Kansas City's World War I Monuments

James J. Heiman is the author of Voices in Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials
Credit Whoever Credit Goes To / Flickr--CC

Everyone is familiar with the National World War I Monument in Kansas City, but there are others.

On Monday, we'll hear the stories behind some of the most prominent WWI monuments and memorials in Kansas City. James J. Heiman the author of Voices In the Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials joins us.

Guest:

James J. Heiman is the author of Voices In Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Tue April 29, 2014

War: How Violence Can Lead To Stability

Ian Morris is the author of 'War! What Is It Good For? Conflict and the Progress of Civilization from Primates to Robots .'

War is bloody, tragic and violent, but it also has benefits for society—even if it doesn’t feel that way when the bullets are flying.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with a historian about his idea that war ultimately leads to stability and prosperity, despite the high body counts it takes to get there.

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Up to Date
9:00 am
Thu April 10, 2014

A Look Into Kansas City's Past

John Simonson is the author of Kansas City 1940: A Watershed Year.

1940 was a pivotal year for Kansas City. Tom Pendergast’s rule through corruption and debauchery had crumbled, leaving the new local government to reform a city hungry for jazz and liquor.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we examine how Kansas City was different in the World War II era. On the way, we take a look at how the “Paris of the Plains” changed from a den of iniquity to the city we know today.

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Up to Date
11:12 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Examining 100 Years Of The Panama Canal

It's been 100 years since the Panama Canal was completed.
Credit Lyn Gateley / Flickr-CC

You’ve heard of the man, his plan and that canal: Panama. Well, it’s been 100 years since its construction, and the waterway is getting a facelift.

On Monday's Up to Date, we talk about a new local exhibit that explores that century of innovation.

Guest:

  • Alberto Aleman Zubieta, former CEO of the Panama Canal Authority
  • Lisa Browar, president of the Linda Hall Library
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Up to Date
10:27 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Tracing The Atomic Age

The Atomic Age prompted many themed products-- some more dangerous than others.
Credit GetHiroshima / Flickr-CC

If you want drama, the story of how we developed atomic energy has it. From the novelty of X-rays to the destructive power unleashed in Hiroshima, to a major energy source — all the up and downs are there. 

On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk with an author who has traced the details of these events and many in-between to construct a history of the atomic age. We look at how scientists managed to get from Marie Curie’s discovery to the Manhattan Project and beyond. 

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Up to Date
10:02 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Looking Back At The U-2 Spy Plane Incident

Pilot Francis Gary Powers was shot down by the Soviet Union while flying his U-2 spy plane in 1960.
Credit RIA Novosti archive / Wikimedia Commons

Threats to sovereignty along the Black Sea, lots of discussions about spying … it all brings back memories of the Cold War.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk about one of the most notorious incidents of that period. When Russia shot down the U-2 spy plane, pilot Gary Powers became the international face of a mission gone wrong. His son joins us to talk about that event.

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