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Writers Guild Foundation

Despite its shoestring budget and remarkably short shooting schedule, High Noon is revered among cinephiles. Today, author Glenn Frankel reveals how the 1952 film reflects the turbulent political climate of the Red Scare. Then: Buildings can affect our sleep, what we eat and how we feel.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The saying "let's get the hell out of Dodge" exists for a reason. Back in its day, Dodge City, Kansas, was the roughest, toughest town people dared to stop in. Author Tom Clavin, used his obsession with the Wild West to write a book on how the city got its infamous reputation. Also, we speak with the new sheriff of Johnson County, Calvin Hayden, about how he's balancing the safety of his deputies with increasing staffing shortfalls and overtime pay.

In the 1990s, fiddler Dennis Stroughmatt was a student at Southwest Missouri State University when a folklore professor made a passing reference to a little-known dialect of French spoken nearby. An encore presentation of his journey to find out if anyone still spoke Missouri French.

Then, a KU professor on the connection between blues and funk, and Question Quest has the final installment of the mysterious bird lady statue on the Trolley Trail.

Wikimedia Commons

The Vietnam War didn't end silently, it went out to the loud riffs of rock n' roll. Revisit the songs that shaped the 1960s and '70s, and captured the moods of soldiers overseas and civilians at home. We also find out how the electric guitar became the international symbol of freedom, danger and rebellion.

Toronto International Film Festival

It looks like Kansas City is in for another unseasonably warm weekend, which is great for outdoorsy-types and bugs. For those of us who shun the sun, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critic Steve Walker has some movie recommendations that will please anyone, from action-loving misanthropes to historically-minded hermits. These flicks may not be in theaters for much longer, so catch them while you still can!

The Salesman, PG-13

Daphne Matziaraki

This weekend is your last chance to see this year's Academy Award-nominated movies before the prizes are given out on Sunday evening, and Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics recommend you start with the shorts. In case your Oscar-fatigue is already setting in, there's a zombie flick for the thinking man mixed into the bunch, and an animated film (that's not for just kids) from a celebrated Japanese company, Studio Ghibli.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Every major advancement of African-Americans since the Civil War has been met and opposed by "white rage," says Carol Anderson. Today, she explains how resentful whites have looked to halt the progress of blacks through discriminatory policies, laws, intimidation and violence.

Rob Shenk / Flickr -- CC

A look at how Missouri deals with its Confederate past. Plus, the reaction to a newly-published Confederate memoir by a Clay County soldier.

Guests:

William Shepard Walsh / Flickr - CC

For the 3rd year in a row, Abraham Lincoln topped C-SPAN's presidential leadership survey. On Presidents Day (more accurately known as Washington's Birthday), we explore the struggle over emancipation and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

shortCHINESEguy / Flickr - CC

From biblical birthrights to the Belmont Stakes, people have always been obsessed with finishing first. Racing is the most fundamental form of sporting competition and, for better and for worse, a part of human nature. Commentator Victor Wishna elaborates in “A Fan’s Notes.”

You may not even know about it, but there is an earth-moving event happening right downtown. More than 3,000 tons of dirt is being hauled in to the Sprint Center, dumped on the floor, and bulldozed into a twisting track of moguls, ramps and jumps.

Sony Pictures Classics

Whether you're looking for just a few minutes of entertainment or a few hours, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have you covered. Their recommendations for this weekend will get you caught up on all the short films in contention for an Academy Award, and then some. 

Cynthia Haines

2017 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Animated

Courtesy National Orphan Train Complex

There’s only one train line left in Concordia, Kansas (population just over 5,000), and it hauls grain. But more than a hundred years ago there were four train lines. Some of them were passenger trains, and in the 1880s, one carried a group of unaccompanied children from New York.

It stopped in nearby Wayne, Kansas, where strangers were waiting to choose the children.

Courtesy Friends of Arrow Rock

On a bitterly cold afternoon early this winter, Patrick Overton was standing outside the historic Federated Church of Arrow Rock, Missouri, greeting people for the town’s annual folk sing-along. As visitors made their way through the afternoon cold to the warm glow of the church, Overton welcomed old friends, introduced himself to new ones, and joked that it was safe for all to enter because he would not be singing.

Sony Pictures Classics

Plenty of people will be tuning in to a certain "big game" on Sunday but, for those looking for something off the beaten path, these recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics could be just the ticket. There may be fewer cheerleaders and a lot less Lady Gaga, but on the bright side, there are fewer cheerleaders and a lot less Lady Gaga.

A24 Films

Academy Award nominations for this year were announced on Tuesday, so there's no better time to catch the selected movies you may have missed. This weekend's round of recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics include movies nominated for best picture, best actor, best actress and plenty more. The clock is ticking: Cinephiles have just under a month before the Oscars are awarded on Sunday, February 26!

Courtesy Through A Glass Productions

The Kansas City Symphony has released an album of music it commissioned from one of America's most promising composers. We learn about that collaboration, and about the composer's creative process. Then, Langston Hughes lived in Lawrence until just after high school, but still managed to leave a legacy of activism there.

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When he was 4 years old, Ed Dwight built an airplane out of orange crates from Safeway in the backyard of his house in Kansas City, Kansas.

But while growing up in a segregated Kansas City in the 1930s and 1940s, he never dreamed that he could be an airplane pilot.

And he certainly didn't think he'd be the first African-American to train as an astronaut for NASA.

But then, a local newspaper changed the course of his life.

Flannery Cashill

Many people pass by the unmarked statue of a woman at 52nd Street and Brookside Boulevard, every day perhaps without ever noticing the bird shenanigans taking place.

Around the base of the statue, which sits just off to the side of the popular Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail, there is a collection of small gifted birds. And the way that the statue is decorated with these birds seems to mysteriously change over time.

Manitoba Provincial Archives - CC

Do moderates even exist in today's bifurcated political landscape? Today, we examine the ideals of centrism and learn about some of history's notable moderates. Then, we celebrate National Winnie the Pooh Day by remembering the morale-boosting bear of World War I who inspired the world-famous cartoon character.

Sony Pictures Classics

Most of the Kansas City region will be experiencing treacherous travel conditions from Friday afternoon through Sunday, so we wouldn't blame you for wanting to stay snuggled on the couch.

Vincent Chow / Flickr -- CC

From 60 degrees to a winter weather advisory in just a couple of days: yes, the weather here can be manic. A chat with Mike July, who recently retired from the National Weather Service office in KC, about the art of forecasting ... and about his witty social media posts.

Then, in 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. gave a surprising speech at K-State. We'll hear about the impression it left on Kansans.

Pablo Larrain / Twentieth Century Fox

Free samples are awesome, face tattoos should be avoided at all costs, and puppies

El Dorado Police Department

In a twisted crime spree that lasted from 1974 until 1991, Dennis Rader stalked and killed ten people in and around Wichita, Kansas. During and after the spree, he taunted pursuing authorities in letters he sent to police, local news and, once, left in a book at the public library. In the letters, Rader established his identity with a handle that caught on quickly: BTK.

Daniel Wood / KCUR 89.3

As part of events marking  the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the city of Mission, Kansas, hosted a memorial at the Sylvester Powell Junior Community Center. About 70 local residents, including a number of veterans and current servicemen and women, attended. Among them, one of the last survivors of the Pearl Harbor attack.

Dorwin Lamkin, a 94-year-old Shawnee resident,  was a hospital corpsman in the USS Nevada’s sickbay when the battleship was hit by a Japanese torpedo and started to sink.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

After a carol from the Heartland Men's Chorus, we delve into The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art exhibition featuring a 16th century piece of music you have to hear to believe. Then, we explore how museums serve as places for community congregation, not simply as repositories for art.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

Great ideas may be hard to come by, but a new book has us thinking all that's needed is a change of scenery. We also remember the attack on Pearl Harbor, 75 years after it catapulted the nation into WWII. This week's Statehouse Blend Kansas features freshman Democrat Cindy Holscher.

UMKC

Shooting off an email has largely supplanted the practice of hand-writing letters, but certain Letters of Note remind us of their allure. Then, we explore the 83-year history of the University of Missouri-Kansas City with a university staffer who's known to give lunchtime historical tours of the Midtown campus.

Sony Picture Classics

This time of the year can be heavy with tradition, but don't let yourself get stuck in the past. This weekend, Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics are endorsing several movies that could embolden you to break from the familiar and find your own way in life. During the holiday shopping frenzy, make time to be inspired. Stop by your local theater for a flick with a friend.

Cynthia Haines

Eagle Huntress, G

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

First, a recollection of the Chief's overtime victory over the Broncos Sunday night. Then, a look at an agency that settled a case last month involving charges of illegal kickback payments, but is still doing business with the state of Kansas. Finally, Author Candice Millard recounts the adventures of a young Winston Churchill as detailed in her latest book.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Winston Churchill sure didn’t make it easy to become a seminal figure in world history.

Before becoming Great Britain’s prime minister and leading his empire through World War II, Churchill was an extremely ambitious youngster who saw military glory as a pathway to political power. But this type of thinking almost got him killed in the Second Boer War, a late 1890s military conflict in what’s now South Africa.

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