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Kansas Historical Society

Segment 1: Former Kansas Democratic governor on the approaching midterm elections.

In 1979 John Carlin began the first of two terms as Kansas governor. He went on to work as the Eighth Archivist of  the United States by appointment of President Bill Clinton. Today, as a Kansas State University professor and leading figure in local civic engagement, he's still heavily involved in state and the state of politics. We got his take on the race for his former office.

Segment 1: History of deaf discrimination in the United States.

Members of the hearing-impaired community oft face unique challenges when living in America. We discuss the history of persecution against people with deafness in the United States as well as milestones alongside the path to equal rights. Also, meet the local instructor who teaches deaf refugees their first language: American Sign Language.

Missouri State Capitol Commission, Missouri State Archives

The Lake of the Ozarks is one of Missouri's most popular weekend getaways, which is what inspired Dan William Peek and Kent Van Landuyt to publish A People's History of the Lake of the Ozarks a couple of years ago.

The two authors say they hope that all visitors, true locals, newcomers or just weekend vacationers take the time to appreciate the lake not only for the amenities it offers today, but also for the nearly forgotten history that lies beneath the water.

The Stories And Ethics Of DNA Testing

Jul 3, 2018

For some, genetic testing can provide answers to lifelong questions. But DNA also raises unique ethical conundrums when it comes to privacy and discrimination. On this episode, we dive into the personal stories and moral curiosities about DNA.

Guests:

Portraits of George and Martha Washington as they appeared on a early 20th century postcard.
Boston Public Library

Segment 1: Kansas Supreme Court rules new school funding plan lacks sufficient money but gives legislature another year to eliminate shortfall.

In order to avoid school shutdowns, the Kansas Legislature recently added $522 million to the education budget over the next five years. Still, critics argue this will not be enough and more needs to be added for inflation. Today, we looked at this latest development in the longstanding Gannon case and its implications for the future of public education in the state.

Segment 1: A team of linguists discover a new accent in southwest Kansas. 

Liberal, Kansas, and other nearby communities are developing a distinct accent. We find out how the language change is a sign of a vibrant and growing Latino pouplation. 

Segment 2, beginning at 18:35: The lesser known history of the Ozark region.

LaBudde Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library

Who in Kansas City remembers AIDS activists smashing vials of HIV-positive blood in City Hall, and abortion opponents trying to display fetuses in coffins at Planned Parenthood protests?

It was 25 years ago, so you’d have to be a certain age to remember. And you’d need to have been paying attention to the news.

Kansas City Business Journal

Kansas City's long-vacant Luzier Cosmetics Building may soon have a new tenant: The Nelle, an urban social club for women.

Although a lease hasn't yet been signed, Nelle co-founder Sierra Miramontez said she and her business partner, Lauren Saks, have been in talks with the building's owner and developer Butch Rigby since last year. They plan to occupy about 15,000 square feet inside 3216 Gillham Plaza and open in the fall or early 2019.

Peter Borsari / Kansas City Business Journal

A nondescript building in the Kansas City area is home to something that many in the art world can't believe exists in a Midwest city, according to the man tasked with selling it, according to the Kansas City Business Journal.

Original 18th-century engravings by William Hogarth. Photos by pioneering photographer Weegee. Millions of photographs, plates, line drawings and ephemera, such as posters, broadsides and tickets. And it's all on the market at the fire-sale price of $15 million.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1:  The certified public accountant and former businessman explains why he's fit for the governor's office.

As a fourth-generation Kansan and the current state insurance commissioner, Republican Ken Selzer believes he has the experience to succeed as governor. Today he discussed his approach to taxes, the Second Amendment and the changes he'd make to clean up politics in Topeka.

Danny Wood / KCUR 89.3

Decades after most of the buildings were dismantled, newspaper articles raved about the beautiful vistas from a hilltop in Clay County: “One of the finest views of Missouri River countryside in all directions that may be found,” the Kansas City Journal wrote in 1941.

Google Earth

Segment 1: Some residents say big, new homes on small, old lots are changing the nature of the Kansas suburb.

Home teardowns are not a new problem in Prairie Village, but the issue is receiving a lot of new attention. Today, we asked city leadership how they would strike a balance between property owners' ability to build what they want on their own land, and preserving the look and feel of what's long been known as a modest, affordable community.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: From 2001 to 2013, more than 1,300 phone calls to attorneys from prisoners at a Leavenworth detention facility were improperly recorded.

Considered a bedrock of the American justice system, KCUR reporting has uncovered what appears to be repeated attorney-client privilege violations at a privately-run detention facility in Leavenworth, Kansas. Today, we discussed the ongoing investigation into the improperly recorded phone calls, some of which were shared with federal prosecutors, and considered the implications of the alleged breaches.

Kathleen Pointer / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: A longtime school teacher and a former tech executive are just two of the Democrats looking to take on Kevin Yoder in November.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Kansas governor discusses his transition to power, his election campaign, and the challenges facing his state.

Four months ago, then-Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer stepped into the position vacated by then-Gov. Sam Brownback. Today, he sat down for a wide-ranging conversation that covered school funding, the Kansas Department for Children and Families, a newly-enacted adoption statute, and his campaign to win the governorship without aggressively challenging rival Republican Kris Kobach.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Finding the best way to memorialize Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Kansas City.

Many in Kansas City agree there should be something here to memorialize the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The question is, what? Following suggestions The Paseo be renamed (or 39th Street or 63rd) Mayor Sly James appointed an advisory group to recommend how best to proceed. Today, we spoke with the co-chair of that panel, which recommended attaching Dr. King's name to a yet-to-be-built terminal at the airport.

New And Noteworthy Podcasts Of 2018

May 21, 2018

What gets you interested in history? For some people, it's the pomp of a royal wedding that gets them digging into the annals of British aristrocracy. Today, we discuss the royal wedding and find out why one history podcast is paying close attention to it. We'll also check out other new and noteworthy podcasts that came out this year.

Guests:

Joe Carson / Courtesy of Bob Hughes Jr.

Updated 5:45 p.m., Friday: After weeks of discussing which street to name after Martin Luther King Jr., an advisory group is recommending not renaming a street at all — but the Kansas City International Airport.

Mayor Sly James clarified at a press conference Monday, if the idea is approved by City Council, the new single-terminal would be renamed, not the entire Kansas City International Airport. But, he said that doesn’t make the proposed gesture any less significant.

Kansas Historical Society

The Missouri General Assembly is scheduled to convene a special session Friday to consider impeaching Gov. Eric Greitens.  

Only 14 governors have ever faced impeachment.

So who was the first governor to be impeached in America?

That would be Charles Robinson, the  first governor of the State of Kansas. He took office in February 1861, just a few weeks before the Civil War started.

Segment 1: From Abilene to KC: The history of Sprint.

It's a multi-billion dollar company with thousands of local employees. But did you know that Sprint got its start in Abilene, Kansas? Over a century ago, a farmer-turned-businessman started stringing lines through town and bought up local independent telephone companies. Hear how the company grew from there.

Oscar Sanisidro / KU

Silvisaurus condrayi, the only dinosaur known to have lived on the land that is now Kansas, is strutting its stuff again in Lawrence.

The dinosaur's skeleton is featured in a new exhibit at the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute & Natural History Museum, along with an interactive display with images of the creature and the environment where it lived 100 million years ago.

Segment 1: What does motherhood mean in the animal world?

Humans really rely on moms to survive. But in the animal world, this experience may vary — especially since some species eat their young. We learn about different examples of motherhood across various species.

TIMELINE: Sprint's 120 Years In Kansas City

May 11, 2018
Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri.

The Sprint campus in Overland Park, Kansas, was inaugurated in the late 1990s. It's a collegial brick complex surrounded by lawns and trees, and built to house about 14,000 employees. Today, more than 6,000 Sprint workers occupy the company's headquarters, and some of the space is leased to other businesses.

Kevin Young

Kansas doesn't have many opportunities to brag about being home to someone who's a mover and shaker in the national culture.

But Topeka can be proud of Kevin Young, who was named poetry editor of "The New Yorker" last year and is director of the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Young moved to Topeka when he was nine, and spent his formative high school years in the city.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Local 15-year-old creates a space for teens and young adults to embrace their love of books.

Book festivals for adults are a dime a dozen. Now, a teenager from Prairie Village is looking to give young readers a chance to geek out over their favorite past-time, too. We met the organizer, and spoke with two writers who are taking part this weekend in the first ever LitUp Festival.

Segment 1: Poetry Editor for The New Yorker was influenced by childhood in Topeka.

Kevin Young's latest collection of poems Brown reminisces about his childhood in Kansas and how figures like Linda Brown, James Brown and John Brown have made an impact on both a historic and personal level.

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Segment 1: Douglas County voters are deciding on a contentious tax increase for jail and mental health services.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Segment 1: A merger with T-Mobile could change Sprint's long-standing relationship to the metro.

Image from the National Register of Historic Places application.

First off, breathe easy Kansas City history buffs.

The inner sanctum of the Savoy Grill, that 1903 time-capsule of dark oak woodwork, terrazzo floor, Old West murals and Harry Truman’s Booth No. 4, returns when the $47.5 million renovation of the Savoy Hotel is completed this summer.

Yes, the adjoining dining room — a 1960s addition, by the way — is getting a contemporary upgrade, although the original columns, ceiling and floor will remain.

Paul Sableman / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: Schools in the Shawnee Mission district have been accused of stifling expression during student demonstration.

During last Friday's national school walkout, parents and students at several Shawnee Mission schools reported that administrators attempted to curate and censor student speech. These complaints have spurred an investigation by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas. Today, we asked what happened during the demonstrations, and how the school district is responding.

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