hip-hop/rap

Courtesy Eddie Moore

Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle, a youthful group of forward-thinking jazz-based musicians, is one of Kansas City’s most accomplished ensembles.

The core Outer Circle band currently consists of keyboardist Moore, guitarist Adam Schlozman, bassist DeAndre Manning and drummer Zach Morrow. The band occasionally tours (it has a gig in Austin later this month) and Moore hosts a weekly jazz jam session every Wednesday at Californos and a monthly showcase at the Tank Room, in which he collaborates with hip-hop artists.

Courtesy Second Hand King

Working as Second Hand King, the locally based Joe Stanziola is a self-described “doo-wop rap” artist.

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR 89.3

On Ces Cru's new song "Purge," Donnie "Godemis" King and Mike "Ubiquitous" Viglione get more political than they have ever been before. Over a menacing and melodic piano, several voices say things like "friends, family, coworkers — all undocumented" and "it's genocide." 

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR 89.3

Ahead of the release of her new book of poetry, Striking the Black Snake​, local poet Monique Salazar joins us to share some of her personal journey, including her inspiring experience at Standing Rock, her heritage and memories of an abusive childhood.

Plus, Kansas City rap duo Ces Cru on their latest album "Catastrophic Event Specialists."

Guests:

Courtesy Mello Music Group

Stik Figa
Central Standard (Mello Music Group)

Central Standard, the latest release by the Topeka-based rapper Stik Figa, chronicles the struggles of a man begrudgingly beginning to accept that his musical career is unlikely to yield fame and fortune.

Strange Music

Big Scoob
H.O.G. (Strange Music)

Years before Tech N9ne became internationally known, before his Strange Music empire dominated Kansas City hip-hop — and the hip-hop label world in general — there were the 57th Street Rogue Dog Villains. Big Scoob was the group's “street-hustler,” his fellow rapper Txx Will told The Pitch in 2002.

Courtesy Lincoln Marshall / Facebook

Lincoln Marshall is the Kansas-based rap duo of Approach (Sean Hunt) and MilkDrop ( John-Alan Suter). They're on the bill for this weekend's Sound Machine concert, a monthly event that's envisioned as a miniature version of the annual Middle of the Map Fest.

3 reasons we're listening to Lincoln Marshall this week:

Courtesy David Muhammad

In room 309 at Shawnee Mission East High School, social studies teacher David Muhammad and his students tackle some of humanity's most difficult subjects — on a recent Tuesday afternoon, for example, his international relations class was studying the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. 

After class, he's also known for encouraging respectful debates about topics confronting America — a video of one of those debates about the Confederate flag last year has close to 50,000 views on YouTube

Facebook

Mac Lethal
Congratulations

Over the last decade and a half, the Kansas City rapper Mac Lethal has become a personality locally and beyond. He has a huge YouTube presence. He’s published a novel based on his Tumblr. He’s performed on "Ellen." He hosts an MTV show where he asks trivia questions to drunk people ("Binge Thinking," described in the opening credits as “the best pub crawl game show on TV”).

What goes into making a beat? Usually, producers toil in the background, but a local promoter is bringing beatmaking to center stage.

Guests:

Rich the Factor
Smile and Whale Mafi (Major Factor Records)

In the parlance of the street, the Kansas City rapper Rich the Factor has spent most of the past two years on “vacation.”

Since his extended incarceration recently ended, the man born Richard Johnson has been making up for lost time. “I’m fresh up out the pen and I’m back with a vengeance,” he raps on “Blow the Horn,” a combative track on one of his two new albums.

Courtesy Indyground Entertainment

Ray Pierce, the man who performs as Steddy P, is the founder of Indyground Entertainment, a miniature version of Tech N9ne’s Strange Music empire. The label has issued music by regional artists including Farout and Dom Chronicles.

3 reasons we're listening to Steddy P this week:

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Morgan Cooper is a Kansas City hip-hop emcee and cinematographer who has been making music for about two years. Under the name Barrel Maker, he collaborates with local producers Conductor Williams and Lion to create intricately layered songs about struggling, but always remaining positive and diligent to achieve his goals as an artist and citizen.

Matthew Hodapp / KCUR 89.3

A decade ago, lovers of soul and hip-hop in Kansas City would gather on Sunday nights at a greasy downtown dive bar to listen to DJ’s and eat hot wings. MCs would spit rhymes and pretty soon a break-dancing circle would form.

Fast forward to 2016, and some of those people, plus a whole new crew, have joined in on a similar event. But now it’s in the afternoon and involves a lot more crayons.

Courtesy Blk Flanl

Blk Flanl
Blk Flanl II

Sequoia Maner grew up just miles from Compton, and she first heard rapper Kendrick Lamar’s mix tapes on local L.A. radio. Now she uses his art in class to probe race and radicalism. We hear her story and explore Lamar's work.

Maner will be the keynote speaker tonight at KU's Reflections on Kendrick Lamar.

Guest:

Facebook.com/JohnFogerty

An exploration of John Fogerty's new album, Wrote A Song For Everyone, which features rearranged classics, new music and a who's-who of guest artists.

During any given week, local hip-hop artist Les Izmore may be found free-styling in the Crossroads, fronting an 18 piece afro-beat/funk dance band, or opening for big acts coming through, like Kendrick Lamar and next week, Talib Kweli.

Misogyny in Hip-Hop Culture

Mar 26, 2013

It seems that nowadays, anytime you hear a hip-hop song the lyrics are full of negative and insulting messages. Whether these comments are racist, misogynistic, or just downright disrespectful it's easy to associate the entire hip-hop culture with these words of hate. On this Central Standard, we look specifically at misogyny in hip-hop music.


KCUR

Roy Scott loves music. He was 12 when he first started writing lyrics, 15 when he started to produce his own beats. He became part of the underground “gangster rap” subculture. This is when Scott became “Macc James,” a member of the Chop It Up Clicc. But as Scott got older with kids of his own, he realized the power and influence music can have on young people’s lives.

A Vibe Called Mesh: Jazz Meets Hip-Hop

Mar 12, 2012

On this Monday's Central Standard, we explore how area artists honor Jazz’s heritage and progression, through the language of Hip-Hop.