Health Levy

Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center

The Kansas City Council on Thursday approved a $1.5 billion budget for the upcoming fiscal year that boosts spending from health fund reserves to pay for indigent care.

After some last-minute lobbying from providers, the council took $300,000 from the reserve to bump up next year’s allocation for Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center and Children’s Mercy Hospital. Two-thirds of the increase goes to Samuel Rodgers.

Council members did not discuss the health funding at their Thursday meeting.

File photo

A Kansas City Council committee has added some funding for indigent health care services in a revised 2016-17 budget to be considered Thursday by the full council – much to the relief of Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center.

The Finance and Governance Committee on Wednesday recommended approval of the revised budget, which allocates about $300,000 in reserves from the health levy fund to Samuel Rodgers and Children’s Mercy Hospital. Two thirds of the bump would go to Samuel Rodgers.

Mike Sherry / Heartland Health Monitor

A simmering dispute over spending from a multimillion dollar health fund is scheduled to come to a head next Thursday as the Kansas City Council considers the city budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget would reallocate the $31 million in health levy funding that supports indigent care at six hospitals and clinics, including Truman Medical Center, Swope Health Services and Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center.

Elana Gordon / KCUR

Voters in Kansas City, Missouri, struck down a measure in Tuesday's election that would have prohibited the city from giving incentives to companies that make parts for nuclear weapons. Voters lent their support, on the other hand, to renewing a property tax that funds neighborhood health clinics, ambulance services and Truman Medical Center. Voters also favored a ballot measure requiring that most nonprofits pay an existing city hotel convention tax.

Health Tax Renewal Goes Before Voters Tuesday

Mar 28, 2013
Elana Gordon / KCUR

Kansas City has long supported health services for people without insurance or a means to pay. This is primarily done through a health levy, or property tax, that brings in about $50 million annually. A portion of that tax will soon expire. Renewing it is now up for a popular vote this Tuesday. It’s Question 1 on the ballot. Despite all the contention around health policies and spending right now, there doesn’t appear to be much opposition to the local measure.

Elana Gordon / KCUR

Efforts to renew Kansas City’s health levy went into full gear today. A renewal of the temporary property tax is up for a vote next month, and proponents want it reinstated for another nine years.

Full Council To Take Up Health Levy Today

Jan 17, 2013

Kansas City’s health levy has long funded ambulance services and other care for residents without insurance or a means to pay. A portion of that levy is temporary, and it expires next year.

While much has changed since the levy was first introduced, city leaders and proponents of the tax are pushing to renew that temporary portion for nine more years. The full council is slated to take up the proposed renewal later today, and doing so could pave the way for a popular vote on the tax this spring.

Kansas City leaders look at the role of the city health care tax, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon and House GOP leaders negotiate over workplace discrimination and workers’ comp bills, and more.  It’s a daily digest of headlines from KCUR.

City's Health Care Tax Under Review

Apr 15, 2012
a.drian / flickr

Residents of Kansas City have long financed public health, ambulance and indigent health services through a property tax which last year, brought in nearly $50 million.