health

Beyond Our Borders
6:45 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Kansas, Missouri Continue To Struggle In Health Rankings

Credit Marius Mellebye / Creative Commons-Flickr

New health rankings  show Kansas stuck at No. 27 among the 50 states, the same slot it occupied last year. But there was a time – not that long ago – when the state ranked much higher than the middle of the pack.

The annual United Health Foundation rankings are a snapshot of 30 health measures ranging from clinical care to behavior and environment to state policy. Dr. Rhonda Randall, the foundation’s chief health advisor, says there’s no mistaking the trend.

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Up To Date
1:40 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Doctors Express Concerns Over Proposed Research Regulations

Credit Merrill College of Journalism / Flickr Creative Commons

  A new proposal from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services would change the way we regulate medical research. Some doctors disagree with the changes believing that it will  confuse patients, and make participation in clinical trials more difficult. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a bioethicist and an outcomes researcher about why they oppose altering research guidelines. 

Guests: 

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Up To Date
2:47 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

KU Med's Linda Redford Works To Meet Needs Of Aging Prison Population

Credit publik15 / flickr.com

America’s prisons are dealing with an unprecedented issue: a rapidly increasing population of elderly inmates. It’s estimated that one-third of the entire prison population will be 55 years and older by the year 2030.

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Up to Date
1:11 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Getting The Scoop On The Enterovirus Hitting KC

States with CDC Lab-confirmed EV-D68 Infections
Credit Centers for Disease Control

With the kids in school, the risk of viral infection skyrockets. Over the past month, a rare form of enterovirus has sent more than 400 children in the Kansas City area to the emergency room.

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with local health care professionals to better understand Enterovirus D68.

Guests:

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Up to Date
11:04 am
Wed August 13, 2014

How Lifestyle Changes Can Help Depression

Entertainer Robin Williams' suicide is focusing national attention on the problem of depression.
Credit Ron Henry / Flickr-CC

The death of Robin Williams is sparking a nation-wide discussion about depression and its effects.

On Wednesday's Up to Date we hear about new research that suggests that lifestyle changes can make more of a difference than medicine when it comes to clinical depression.

Guest:

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Sports
11:48 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Energy Drinks Raise Red Flag In High School Athletics

Credit Daniel Juřena / Flickr--CC

High school athletes in Kansas and Missouri start outdoor workouts for fall sports in August, no matter how hot or humid it is outside. One of the main safety concerns in the heat is dehydration. 

Sometimes it’s not the weather but what the athletes drink that makes the problem worse. A can of Red Bull, Monster, 5-Hour Energy, or any other energy drink before practice can dehydrate an athlete.

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Central Standard
4:59 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Stress: From Causes To Coping Mechanisms

More than a quarter of Americans self-identify as being under a great deal of stress. What's troubling us, and why do some people respond to stressful situations with greater resilience than others?

Guest:

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Heartland Health Monitor
3:42 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Missouri Creates Unique Medical Classification: Assistant Physician

Assistant physicians will be allowed to practice primary care in rural and underserved parts of Missouri.
Credit Adrian Clark / Flickr--CC

 

Missouri now boasts a new category of medical licensee: assistant physicians.

Despite strong opposition from some healthcare groups, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon on Thursday signed into law a measure that would allow medical school graduates who have not completed residencies – or even obtained medical licenses — to practice medicine.

Nixon, however, issued signing statements warning of the need for additional safeguards to ensure that patients are not placed in jeopardy.

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Up To Date
3:14 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Death of Kansas City Veteran Emphasizes Need For Timely PTSD Treatment

Army Specialist Isaac Sims seen here in a holiday greeting sent from Ramadi, Iraq in 2009.
Credit 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division Public Affairs/US Army

The death last month of 26-year old Army veteran Isaac Sims in a confrontation with Kansas City, Missouri police raised many questions including whether this loss of life could have been prevented.

On this edition of Up to Date Steve Kraske brings together a panel to look at the events leading up to Sims' death, the special municipal court that works with veterans facing criminal charges, and a therapy program treating military PTSD sufferers while they are still on active duty.

Guests:

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Up To Date
6:00 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Delirium Tremens Changed Views On 19th Century Alcoholism

Imagine watching a group of men mutilate the body of your mother.  This is what poet Edgar Allan Poe experienced as a hallucination brought on by alcohol-induced delirium tremens, DT’s.  On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with historian Matthew Osborn to discover how this condition, first described in 1813, was the catalyst for changing how the medical profession diagnosed and treated the problems of alcohol abuse.

Guest:

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Up To Date
5:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Baby Boomers Hold The Highest Rate Of Suicide, Especially in Kansas

Trends in Suicide Rates* Among Persons Ages 25–64 Years, Both Sexes, by Age Group, United States, 1991–2009
Credit Centers for Disease Control

There are 76 million Americans who were born between the mid-40s and the mid-60s. The Baby Boomers have much of the wealth, much of the power, much of the responsibility in our nation today. But, they also now have the highest suicide rate among all age groups. Guest host Brian Ellison talks with Kansas City Star reporter Rick Montgomery about this alarming statistic and how the rate in Kansas has skyrocketed in the last few years.

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Up To Date
11:05 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Yoga Master Max Strom

Credit www.maxstrom.com

There is no app for happiness. So reads the title of Max Strom's new book that examines what holds us back from being happier people. Turns out that one big obstacle is technology, which has only made many of us more depressed, anxious, sleep deprived and over-medicated. On Thursday's Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with the yoga master about how inner calm and self-awareness can help people cope with the stress our devices bring.

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Up To Date
9:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

America's Chronic Pain Problem

Credit vaXzine / Flickr Creative Commons

If you’ve got a shooting pain in your back that won’t quit or nagging, achy knees, you might be one of millions of Americans who suffer from chronic pain.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske sits down with Judy Foreman to discuss her new book, A Nation in Pain. We'll get to the bottom of why our society fails to fully treat nearly 100 million Americans who live with chronic pain.

Guest:

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Central Standard
1:15 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Kick It Like A Habit: Giving Up Old Behaviors And Developing New Ones

Excessive television, overindulging in junk food and soda: Can we replace bad habits with good ones?
Credit public domain / Wikimedia Commons

Aristotle said, "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." 

But making excellence a habit is easier said than done. For most people, the word habit evokes thoughts of junk food or television, not excellence.

Psychologist Bruce Liese stopped by Central Standard to talk about the ins and outs of habit formation, and help us recognize the difference between a good habit and a bad one. He offered advice on getting to the root causes of our most deeply ingrained patterns and offered insight into the common problem of relapse. 

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Health
2:39 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Why Your Allergies Seem To Be Worse This Year In Kansas City

Pollen from trees and other plants hit an all-time-high in Kansas City about two weeks ago.
Credit Emily Whitty / Submitted photo

If your allergies seem more severe this year in Kansas City, you're not alone.

That's according to Dr. Jay Portnoy, who leads the allergy and asthma department at Children's Mercy Hospital.

"We've been tracking pollen for 15 years in the Kansas City area and over that time, the pollen count has been slowly increasing," Portnoy says. "Each year is getting a little bit worse."  

On Thursday, Portnoy explained to Up To Date Host Steve Kraske that the day's tree pollen count was only 529, but two weeks ago, it hit an all-time high of 9,000.

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Heartland Health Monitor
7:52 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Missouri And Kansas Rank Low On Public Health Spending, Report Shows

Missouri spends the least on public health per person in the country, according to a new report out from the non-partisan Trust for America's Health. 

The Show-Me state spent just $5.86 per person, compared with a national average of $27.49, in fiscal 2013, the report says.

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Up To Date
1:41 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Off-Label Drug Use

Credit Google Commons

A doctor looking to help a patient prescribes a medication for a condition it was not originally marketed to treat. How legal, and how risky the off-label use of prescription drugs?On Thursday's Up To Date  Steve Kraske talks with a pharmacist about just how common this practice is among physicians and why drug companies don’t market their products for multiple uses.  

Guest:

Rick Couldry is Director of Pharmacy at the University of Kansas Hospital. 

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Government
4:07 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Nixon Proposes New Medicaid Expansion Program, Catching Legislators Off Guard

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:01 pm

In the final weeks of the legislative session, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has made a last-ditch effort to resurrect a push to expand Missouri’s Medicaid program and accept roughly $2 billion a year in federal money.

The governor, a Democrat, unveiled his “Missouri Health Works’’ program before business leaders Monday in Cape Girardeau. By coincidence or design, state House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka and an opponent of Medicaid expansion, was also in Cape on Monday with conservative low-tax icon Grover Norquist to highlight a different issue.

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Government
6:20 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Autism Insurance Bill Heads To Kansas Governor

A bill awaiting Kansas Governor Sam Brownback’s signature would require health insurance sold in the state to include coverage for autism services--at least in a limited fashion. 

The bill sent to the governor last week includes coverage for Applied Behavioral Analysis. 

Representative John Rubin, of Shawnee, guided the bill through the House.  He says research shows ABA is the most effective form of therapy for a majority of kids with autism, but it needs to start in the preschool years…

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Up To Date
3:14 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Ethics Professors: Who Should Get Organ Donations?

UNOS works to advance organ availability and transplantation.
Credit United Network for Organ Sharing

In the Midwest, the supply of organs for patients who need transplants to live is relatively strong.  But, that’s not the case in many locations across the country.

Currently, donated organs are distributed through local and regional networks, but there is talk of changing that system to one that basically puts everyone on equal footing.

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Health
7:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Wyandotte County At Bottom, Johnson At Top In New Health Rankings

The fifth annual County Health Rankings are out, and the parts of Kansas that have struggled in prior years are still at the bottom of the list.

The rankings provide a clear picture of just how much health depends on social factors like poverty and education.

Johnson County tops the list again this year as the healthiest county in Kansas. Dr. Gianfranco Pezzino, of the Kansas Health Institute, says it’s more than just coincidence that the Kansas City suburb is also the state’s wealthiest county.

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Examining The Reality Of Eating Disorders

Credit Brent Weichsel / Creative Commons

We eat every day and most of us enjoy it. It satiates our hunger, and provides us with nutrition and complex and pleasurable flavors and textures. But for some people eating can become the center of an obsession, an inescapable part of the date filled with anxiety. Eating disorders impact 2.7 percent of population, according the National Institute of Mental Health, but the problem extends far beyond the struggling individual.

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Up to Date
11:22 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Conquering Broadway And MS

Singer Jennifer Holliday joins Steve Kraske in the studio for Up to Date.
Credit Beth Lipoff / KCUR

Jennifer Holliday, the original "Dreamgirl," has known a lot of good times and some rough ones, too. 

She became a star on Broadway in the production of Dreamgirls, but in the years since, she's depression and faced an ongoing struggle with multiple sclerosis.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with her about about her music, her life and why they call her “The Queen of Broadway Gospel.”

Guest:

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Up to Date
11:17 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Prairie Village Surgeon Confronts Death By Building His Own Coffin

Dr. Jeff Piehler of Prairie Village reacted to his stage-four prostate cancer diagnosis by building his own coffin.
Credit Shari Hartbauer / Lincoln Journal Star

It’s one thing for a doctor to counsel a seriously-ill patient about how to deal with his illness and how to face the idea of death. But imagine going from being the doctor to being the patient.

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Health
11:21 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Committee 'Green Lights' KU Med Center Building Project

The legislative committee charged with overseeing state building projects today added money to next year’s budget to help the University of Kansas fund construction of a $75 million classroom building on its Kansas City, Kan. campus.

The Joint Committee on State Building Construction voted to add $1.4 million to the fiscal 2015 budget to help pay for bonds that will be issued to fund the project.  The plan is for the state to contribute $15 million over time to help finance up to $35 million in construction bonds.

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Up To Date
4:19 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Healthcare Foundation Announces Efforts To Enroll More In Obamacare

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius visited Kansas City Monday morning, drumming up interest in Obamacare.

In the first segment of Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with the head of Healthcare Foundation of Greater Kansas City about insurance available through the Affordable Care Act and ongoing efforts to connect people to it.

Guest:

  • Dr. Bridget McCandless, president and CEO, Healthcare Foundation of Greater Kansas City
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Up to Date
10:43 am
Thu January 16, 2014

Concussion Debate Sparks New Treatments

Head injuries happen in many sports, including football and soccer.
Credit joncandy / Flickr-CC

Three years ago, a Spring Hill High football player collapsed on the field after a stunning play. The cause? Brain hemorrhaging due to a concussion that went unrecognized and untreated. With sports-related brain injuries on the rise, many are calling for major safety reforms and a new approach to handle the problem. 

On Thursday's Up to Date, we discuss how the approach to these types of concussions is changing and check in with the experts who are leading the culture shift in concussion treatment.

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Health
8:13 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Norovirus Confirmed In Kansas Vomiting, Diarrhea Outbreak

A pre-Christmas outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea that sickened almost 300 people in southwest Kansas was caused by norovirus, according to state health officials.

The outbreak has been linked to a Jimmy John's sandwich restaurant in Garden City.

As of Jan. 3, 282 people who ate at the restaurant between Dec. 10 and Dec. 24 reported becoming ill—most of them within 72 hours of eating at Jimmy John’s.

The restaurant voluntarily closed from Dec. 24 through Dec. 26 for a thorough cleaning and disinfection.

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People
8:31 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Lee's Summit Woman Honored On Rose Parade Float For Organ Donation

Lezlie McLendon's image in flowers for Rose Parade float.
Credit The Midwest Transplant Network

A Lee’s Summit, Mo., woman will be remembered in a special way at Wednesday’s Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Lezlie McLendon’s family hopes the memorial will send a message to others  about the benefit of organ donation.

The family says it not only saves lives, but helps those grieving.

Lezlie McLendon was driving with her sister earlier this year when she suddenly passed out. Her sister got her out of the car and tried to administer CPR, but Lezlie’s cardiac arrest left her in a coma she never woke up from.

At 45, Lezlie had never been seriously ill.

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Up to Date
10:51 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Surviving And Thriving After Bacterial Meningitis

Andy Marso, author of 'Worth the Pain: How Meningitis Nearly Killed Me - Then Changed My Life for the Better,' lost all of his fingers except his right thumb to bacterial meningitis.
Credit Andy Marso/Facebook

Bacterial meningitis has been in the news recently, with outbreaks at Princeton University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. But nine years ago, it made local headlines when a University of Kansas student became seriously ill with the disease overnight.

In the second part of Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with that student, now a reporter in Topeka, about the disabling effects of the disease and how it's changed his life.

Guest:

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