Gardening

This time of year, the sight of greenery cropping up is exciting, and the urge to grow your own fresh herbs can be overwhelming. How can you get in on the action if you don't have a lawn or plot of land to use? 

Guest:

  • Debbie Glassberg, owner, HomeContained, and rooftop gardener
Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

Late summer in the Midwest is tomato season. For tomato growers around that country, it’s time to pick their bounty and calculate their earnings.

While sun and rain might be free, tomato farmers have to carefully weigh everything else they put in to growing their crop. Research and the development of new tools – from novel seed varieties resistant to diseases to additional fertilizers – has changed the input costs for growers.

SuzetteSuzette / Flickr-CC

Most of us have a spice rack with lots of different choices in it, but if you’re not a gourmet chef, you might not know which herbs and spices pair the best with different meats and veggies. Then there's the ones with fancy packaging sold fresh at the store-- are they really that much better than your cupboard’s dry goods? 

On Friday's Up to Date, we delve into the pungent world of herbs and spices to see which can survive and thrive in your own Kansas or Missouri backyard and what's worth the splurge on aisle two.

Danielle Sherry / vegetablegardner.com

Spring is the season of possibility and hope. Just ask any gardener. Seeds go in the ground, are lovingly tended and then . . .  Mother Nature steps in. On Wednesday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with two experts to get some advice for your gardens and trees.

Guests:

Flickr user Sue Craske

There’s a new resource in town for Kansas City gardeners: a seed library. Starting this spring at the Ruiz branch of the Kansas City Public Library, anyone with a library card can check out seeds for typical garden plants, from cilantro to tomatoes. At the end of the season, patrons return the seeds they harvest from the plants they grow.

Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

With summer produce in full bloom, Café Sebastienne's Jennifer Maloney shares some summer dishes from the restaurant's kitchen.

Chilled Cantaloupe and Basil Soup

Serve this cool favorite with a dry Riesling wine.

Beth Lipoff

  Growing and eating local food isn’t just about health for one Kansas City group. Their farm fields are fertile ground for developing responsibility and shaping young lives, and the group’s leaders hope to harvest more than just tomatoes. 

When you grow up in the city, chickens aren’t something you see every day, but 13-year-old Malek Looney is getting to know them well.

"They’ll flap their wings and make loud noises and squawk at you. And you’ll be like, 'Oh no, they're mad at something,'" says Looney.

Should You Be Talking To Your Plants?

Apr 30, 2013
Hilary Stohs-Krause / Harvest Public Media

Ever know someone who talks to plants?

Maybe it was your offbeat neighbor cooing at his gardenias; maybe your grandmother analyzed baseball with her cucumbers. It seems a bit silly, but researchers say farmers should maybe take notice.

drunkenbotanist.com

Your backyard garden can be a great place to grow vegetables, but the Drunken Botanist has something else in mind for the space.

The Scent Of Scandal

Sep 11, 2012

Light, vibrant or dark, this exotic and elegant beauty is among the world's most popular flowers.

Frank Morris / KCUR

Your neighbors' lawn is green. And yours? A pale shade of brown, with grass that crunches underfoot.

Susan B. Wilson / KCUR

The Kansas City Museum is in its third phase of a major restoration of Corinthian Hall, the old Northeast mansion that houses its collection. And the renovation doesn’t stop at just bricks and mortar.  A recent project aims to recreate the Georgian garden plantings that surrounded the mansion.

Nature in the City: Summer Birds, Hiking

Jun 6, 2012
Len Blumin / Flickr

In Kansas City, we humans have adapted to our hot summer days with central air, trips to the movies and Jones Pool... but how do wild animals do it?

There may be no controlling Mother Nature, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get your garden to cooperate. But keeping your gardening blossoming instead of browning is easier said than done.

Nature in the City: Songbirds, Spring Peepers & Wildflowers

Mar 22, 2012
KeyStroke / Flickr

On this Thursday's Central Standard, we take a look at Nature in the City in it's most colorful season.

katiebread / Flickr

When it hits 67 degrees in January, one must wonder what effect such odd winter weather is having on our plants, trees, and flowers.

Residential Composting

May 25, 2011

Dan Heryer and Brooke Salvaggio from BADSEED Farms visit the studio to talk about ways to compost at home and their new residential composting program starting next month. 

Brooke says that 75% of our household waste is compostable.  Residential composting can be done using any natural materials. 

Kansas City, Mo. – After months of discussion and weeks of committee hearings, Kansas City's Planning and Zoning finally sent the full city council an urban agriculture ordinance Wednesday.

The committee added a number of restrictions including a prohibition on row crops in front yards, restriction of sales to fresh produce and requiring community gardens to get approval from the Board of Zoning Adjustment.