film

Focus Features

Looking for a way to reward yourself for getting out there and snagging some great deals on Black Friday, or  just wanting to avoid the crush of shoppers altogether?  Then get to an area theater and see one (or more) of the movies recommended by Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

Courtesy Tom Poe/Facebook

“If you’re going to sin,” the former Methodist minister Tom Poe once told me, “sin boldly.”

He was using the words of theologian Martin Luther to justify some sort of subversiveness (I can't remember what we were up to) but I’ll forever quote Poe on that one.

Moho Film and Yong Film

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Whether you're looking for a break from grocery shopping, baking, or ornery relatives, Up To Date has the solution; our indie, foreign and documentary film critics are back with movie recommendations for the weekend. Check them out while they're still showing on area screens.

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

When Anthony Ladesich found his father's youthful correspondence with an old Navy friend on a stack of reel-to-reel tapes, he also found so much more: a portal into Kansas City's jazz history, and a way of keeping his dad with him a little longer.

Plus, for the first time ever, a student was admitted to UMKC Conservatory's composition program using the computer as his instrument.

This is an encore edition of Central Standard.

Guests:

A24 Films

It has been a long week for a lot of reasons. If you are looking for a little respite and relief, check out this weekend's recommendations from the Up To Date indie, foreign and documentary film critics before they are no longer available on area big-screens. 

Cynthia Haines

Moonlight, R

  • The story of a young black man struggling to find, and accept, himself while growing up in a rough neighborhood in Miami.

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

Byron Newman / Amazon Studios / Magnolia Pictures

No one will blame you for tuning out the presidential campaign and looking for a way to avoid election stress disorder while waiting for November 8th to blow over. In fact, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics' latest recommendations are essentially a prescription for a weekend full of music, movies and popcorn.

First, a conversation with the co-hosts of Alien Minute, a podcast that takes a minute-by-minute look at the 1979 science-fiction/horror classic, Alien. Then, former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins talks about his latest collection of poetry, The Rain in Portugal.

First, we get a rundown of what audiences can look forward to at next weekend's Kansas International Film Festival. Then, Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters, including Certain Women, Michael Moore in Trumpland, Denial, A Man Called Ove, American Honey, The Birth of a Nation, and In a Valley of Violence.

Laurie Sparham

Ghosts and ghouls haunting your mood, or is it just candy that's giving you a stomach ache? Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have you covered either way. You can avoid the Halloween frights by dimming the lights and catching a not-so-spooky movie. This weekend's recommendations are guaranteed to be completely free of witches and warlocks.

Cynthia Haines

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Don't ask Todd Sheets about the first horror film that he made.

"It's godawful," he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard. "Anything I made before '93 I kind of disowned."

Sheets started making horror movies in the late 1980s in Kansas City. He quickly earned a cult following; he was even dubbed the "Prince of Gore."

Todd Sheets started making horror movies in KC in the late 1980s. He stopped after a close friend died at the Catacombs Haunted House. A health scare — a heart attack and quadruple bypass surgery — inspired him, in part, to make movies again. His latest, Dreaming Purple Neon, has its world premiere tomorrow night at Screenland Armour.

Plus, a chat with musician Rachel Mallin, and an encore presentation on lizards.

Guests:

Courtesy Wide Awake Films

The Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham is already famous enough to have his work in the National Gallery of Art, as well as many other esteemed institutions. But to his hometown of Arrow Rock, population 56, he could stand to be more famous.

As sous chef at Café Sebastienne, Janet Ross prepares ruby trout with a root vegetable hash. As a contestant on Cutthroat Kitchen: Tournament of Terror, she uses murder weapons to prepare Halloween-themed meals like liver and brains. How does she transition between the two? 

In a time of diminishing budgets, guest host Brian Ellison learns how fine-arts program Harmony Project is helping underserved kids in Kansas City do better in school. Then, actor Bryan Cranston says a large part of his successful career has to do with hard work and good luck. This week's Local Listen features the classic rock band Kansas, touring in support of its first album since 2000.

This week, Kansas Citians have an opportunity to see an extraordinary film that’s been publicly screened fewer than a dozen times since its original release in 1920. For decades, film historians figured it was lost.

The film's journey to Kansas City started back in 2004, when Brian Hearn was the film curator of the Oklahoma City Museum and received a strange call from a private investigator in North Carolina.

Music Box Films

Nobody can stay on top of the world forever, and there's nothing like a well-timed helping hand when you're feeling a little down. This weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics prove it's not just animals that sometimes require a rescue. Whether it's a lonesome neighbor or a long-lost schoolmate — all the lonely people — grab a friend and get to an area theater before these films are gone from screens for good.

Cynthia Haines

Jacob Blickenstaff

Millions of people will tune their TVs to the second presidential debate this Sunday, but maybe you're looking for something on the big screen instead. If so, check out this weekend's non-political movie recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics. 

Steve Walker

Mia Madre, R

Teen films from the 1980s (think Fast Times at Ridgemont High and 16 Candles) helped define a generation, but their influence on American culture lasted much longer than the decade in which they were released.

The 2006 film Idiocracy has become shorthand for the dumbing down of American culture. What are we really saying when we reference the movie?

Guests:

Magnolia Pictures

If the excitement of the first presidential debate left you with a little drama fix you need to itch, Up to Date has your prescription. This week, our film critics return to bring you the latest indie, foreign and documentary films showing on local screens. 

Robert Butler

Hell or High Water, R

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of the films reviewed on the program:

  • Little Men
  • The Dressmaker
  • The Hollars
  • The Beatles: Eight Days a Week
  • Hieronymus Bosch, Touched by the Devil
  • Dough
  • The Light Between Oceans
Courtesy of Netflix

KCUR’s Peggy Lowe reported on the Maryville Rape Case in 2013 and has this analysis of a new documentary on the story, which premieres on Sunday on Netflix.

The good news about “Audrie & Daisy,” a new documentary focusing on Daisy Coleman, the girl at the center of the Maryville rape case, is that it documents how Coleman survived and found her tribe.

Eva Hesse / evahessedoc.com

Fall is technically here, despite the sizzling summer weather that has decided to stick around a while longer. Enjoy the first “fall” weekend cozied up on your couch with a mix of comedy, tragedy and history movies recommended by Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics.

Steve Walker

Other People, PG-13

Greg Lam Pak Ng / Flickr - CC

When US Airways Flight 1549 took off from La Guardia airport on January 15, 2009, no one expected it to come to rest minutes later in the middle of the Hudson River. A movie released this month recalls the incident and the quick thinking of pilot, Chesley Sullenberger. Sully recounted that experience with host Steve Kraske in October 2009.

Apple Corps

Has the upcoming election got you feeling burnt out already? Get some relief from the political smear ads of the small screen by watching a movie or two on the big one. This week's picks from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics will make the decision of what to watch a little easier.

Cynthia Haines

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years, Not rated

Shirley Jones and Patrick Cassidy are the mother-and-son team starring in  Have You Met Miss Jones, a musical that chronicles the life of the talented actress and soprano. They share what it's like to balance show business with everyday life and how a family that works together stays together. 

'Have You Met Miss Jones' premieres at New Theatre Restaurant September 22 and runs through November 27. Find more information at newtheatre.com.

The Orchard

After you've had your fill of NFL brutes bashing bodies during the opening weekend of pro football, be sure to check out one of the films recommended by Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics. They may not prominently feature physical acumen, but they do display emotional bouts with the complexity of modern life and the mind.

Cynthia Haines

Life, Animated, PG

Courtesy Amy Greene Vines

Two cars cruise into Kansas City. In one, a man and woman battling poverty and bad luck try to outrun their past. The other is a battered old Jeep Wrangler, in which two estranged sisters attempt to reconnect after a wedding catastrophe.

The stories seem as different as can be but share a key factor: They are the first two feature films to be shot in Kansas City after the establishment of the Film and Media rebate incentive.

Paramount Pictures

As the dog days of summer start to fizzle out and the rain comes down, hold out on building that ark. This week, Up to Date’s indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few good movies to keep you warm, cozy and indoors.

Robert Butler

Hell or High Water, R

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of the films reviewed on the program:

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