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Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Rep. Warren Love made news last month doing something that seems antithetical to their positions in government; hoping in Facebook posts for political violence.

Updated August 31 at 4 p.m. with comments from Love and Gov. Greitens:

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens and Democratic elected officials are calling for a Republican lawmaker from southwest Missouri to step down after he posted on Facebook that people who defaced a Confederate statue should be “hung from a tall tree with a long rope.”

Rep. Warren Love's GOP legislative colleagues are also condemning the Osceola Republican after he posted his reaction to the news that someone threw paint on a Confederate memorial at the Springfield National Cemetery. He wrote: “This is totally against the law. I hope they are found & hung from a tall tree with a long rope.”

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The definition of an American family is no longer a man and his wife, living in suburbia with their 2.3 kids. Today, we learn about some of the economic forces reshaping families. Then, we explore the history of sandlot baseball in Kansas City, and find out how communities are trying to revive the tradition. Later, we discuss the controversy over Democratic Missouri Sen.

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Tensions over the Jackson County jail continue to mount. Attorneys for former inmates filed a class-action lawsuit last week that would force authorities to address the detention center's dangerous, dirty conditions. Today, we speak with two Jackson County legislators about what they'd do to improve the facility. Then, we kick off a week full of conversation with presenters from this year's TEDxKC.

Maybe you're a new parent who's seeking some advice as you're feeding your baby in the middle of the night. Or perhaps you're looking to connect with others who share your political view. A look at the role — both positive and negative — of online communities and how they impact our lives.

Guests:

A lot of people think social media is cutting into how well we interact with each other in real life. A local researcher says that may not be the case.

Guest:

We live in a world filled with options. We’re constantly being asked to “like” or “dislike,” but what are we missing out on when everything is being catered to our preferences?

Guests:

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

Guests:

A recent Pew study shows that a growing number of teens are going online almost constantly. We discuss how young peoples' relationships to technology are changing and explore what effects increased social media use has on teens.

Guests:

Alyson Raletz/KCUR

 The line between individual social media activity and employment status isn’t a clear one, according to feedback we received this week from listeners.

When we asked “Should your boss be able to fire you for what you tweet?” on the air and online, the responses showed the issue of social media and the workplace as a divisive one in Kansas City.  

We received many emphatic yeses, citing personal responsibility.

You know you’re a Kansas City techie when “@KCUR wants to know.”

That’s how Kansas City Startup Village (Twitter: @KCSV) filled in the blank on Twitter when we asked our listeners and followers on social media to complete this sentence: You know you’re a Kansas City techie when …

A Compelling Argument for Quitting Facebook

Jul 9, 2012

On this Central Standard, we speak with the man they call the Antichrist of Silicon Valley.

Facebook will ask its nearly 1 billion users to vote up or down on changes to its privacy policy.

According to a statement released by the social network, the company also put changes up for a vote in 2009. Voting begins today and goes through June 8.

"If more than 30 percent of all active registered users vote, the results will be binding," Facebook said. "If turnout is less than 30 percent, the vote will be advisory."

Accused Facebook Stock Scammer Vanishes

May 23, 2012

Arrest warrants are in force for an Overland Park, Kan. man who allegedly had considerable success scamming banks and intended investors in Facebook shares. 

The new issue of The Atlantic asks: Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? The jury's out, though signs point to maybe.

Facebook didn't necessarily make Tanja Hollander lonely, per se, but it did make her curious. It was a little over two years ago when she looked at that number representing "friends," 626 in her case, and started to analyze it.

Computer Guys: What Privacy?

Apr 16, 2012
Google

In a world where we might all someday wear glasses that check the weather, give us directions, and let us take photos… where do you draw the line?

"I'm excited to share the news that we've agreed to acquire Instagram and that their talented team will be joining Facebook," Mark Zuckerberg just announced.

Last week Apple unveiled its 3rd generation iPad, the aptly-named "the new iPad." (a.k.a. "iPad 3.") Is it worth the upgrade?

Around the same time Google Fiber applied for permission to sell TV services in the Kansas City area; is this a sign that they'll offer up TV services to its Google Fiber customers - in direct competition with providers Time Warner, SureWest,  and AT&T? And will Google know what you want to watch before you've even turned on the TV? 

Probably.