Ethics Professors

The U.S. is pledging to take in 85,000 refugees from around the world in 2016. The Ethics Professors discuss whether that's enough as the crisis in Syria continues. Also, is it ethical to let the free market decide prescription prices if that puts drugs outside the reach of many who need them, and should leaders remain in their positions if they, or their organization, are under investigation?


In light of the recent hack of marital affairs website Ashley Madison, the ethics professors discuss whether it's right for hackers to appoint themselves judge and jury. Also, as laws regarding marijuana change, is it ethical to keep nonviolent drug offenders behind bars?


With the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage, some county clerks have refused to issue marriage licenses, citing religious beliefs. The Ethics Professors discuss performing government duties that conflict with one's faith. Plus, is it okay to break the law in the name of a just cause?


If you favor a hike in the minimum wage, are you obligated to boycott businesses that don't pay their employees enough? Also, should a distasteful comment on Twitter ruin your life? The Ethics Professors tackle these issues on this edition of Up To Date

Indiana and Arkansas are in the news for controversial legislature aimed at protecting religious freedom. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics professors discuss when religious freedom infringes on other freedoms. Plus, what  responsibilities do employers and employees have when it comes to illness, mental or otherwise, in the workplace?


The recent suicide of State Auditor Tom Schweich brought new focus on the impact of political ads. In today's world, any detail of a political figure's life can be fodder for a brutal attack. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors talk about when politics goes too far, and whether it's realistic to limit political tactics.


  Vaccination is just one of many medical choices made for children. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske and guests talk about who gets to weigh in on those decisions: the parents, the doctors, the government?  And what input do children have regarding their own health care?


Jamelle Bouie / Flickr Creative Commons

  In the wake of grand juries not indicting the police officers involved in the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. and the choking death of Eric Garner in New York City, the actions of police officers are receiving intense public scrutiny. 

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and the Ethics Professors look at the question of whether police officers are too often given the benefit of the doubt. 


The Maynard Family /

A terminally-ill woman in Oregon chose to end her life last week, should she be allowed to make this choice? A nurse in Maine aggressively fought that state's strict Ebola quarantine, does the greater good trump individual rights? Courts throughout the country are grappling with same-sex marriage bans, are people entitled to marry?

On this edition of Up to Date, guest-host Jeremy Bernfeld and the Ethics Professors sift through these moral dilemmas and the questions they raise. 


Frank Morris / KCUR

On this edition of Up to Date, the Ethics Professors join Steve Kraske to examine questions raised by recent events making the news. Has the digital theft of female celebrities’ photos changed how we look at victim and perpetrator?  In Ferguson, Missouri, was it right for outside influences to come on the scene and add rhetorical fuel to the fire?  How much involvement should a college or university have in investigating a sexual assault on campus?  Find out what the Professors, and listeners, had to say.

Arpingstone / Wikimedia Commons

Pro-Russian rebels wouldn’t let anybody in to view the bodies of that downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. What’s to make of their actions?

In this country, thousands of “border children” streamed across the border in recent months. The crisis has raised questions about what’s the appropriate way to handle these kids.

On Wednesday's Up to Date Steve Kraske and the Ethics Professors sort through the moral dilemmas presented by each of these events.

Keith Allison / Flickr-CC

With suspects in custody for both the highway and Jewish Community Center shootings, many communities in the metro area are waiting to see how justice will be served.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors return to mull over the ethical questions surrounding crime and punishment. We also look at the recent case of a man who was imprisoned 15 years after his sentencing due to a clerical error.

United Network for Organ Sharing

In the Midwest, the supply of organs for patients who need transplants to live is relatively strong.  But, that’s not the case in many locations across the country.

Currently, donated organs are distributed through local and regional networks, but there is talk of changing that system to one that basically puts everyone on equal footing.

cannabisdestiny / Flickr-CC

John Denver’s “Rocky Mountain High” is Colorado’s state song, and the marijuana legalization law that went into effect this year might be what the late musician had in mind.

On Thursday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors return to discuss the problems that surround marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law, but increasingly accepted in many states. Also on their slate is a look at anti-government protests in Ukraine and Thailand.


Steve Rhodes/Flickr-CC

Google’s unofficial moral slogan is “Don’t be evil,” but some are questioning whether privacy and censorship concerns break that self-imposed creed.

In the first part of Wednesday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors return to discuss slippery ethics surrounding Google’s well-meaning slogan, preemptive breast cancer surgery based on genetics and more.


401(K) 2012/Flickr-CC

When thousands of federal employees are being forced to go without a paycheck indefinitely because of inaction in Congress, is it really ethical for members of Congress to keep accepting their own paychecks?

On Thursday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors join us to discuss that and other issues of murky morals. Should we consider signing up for healthcare part of a civic duty to lower medical costs for everyone? And how should we set a limit when it comes to the cost and scope of treatment?


Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

What if Congress turns down President Obama’s request for authorization to attack Syria? And what if the president proceeds anyway -- even though the American people are saying in polls that they oppose such a move? 

How ethical would that be?

Some might say that when it comes to matters of life and death, an American president ought to have the backing of Congress or the American people.

Then there’s this looming question of whether the U.S. and other nations should boycott the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. The reason? Russia’s anti-gay laws.

Would you pay more for an article of clothing if it meant the person who made it worked in safe factory conditions and earned a fair wage?

Ben Stanfield

How much power is too much when it comes to the hallowed fields of college sports?

First comes love, then comes marriage…then for about 50 percent of us … it’s divorce.