Epsten Gallery

Courtesy Linda Lighton

Linda Lighton makes ceramic sculptures revealing how closely lipsticks resemble bullets. And her white clay flowers bloom not with pistils but with pistols.

Sonie Joi Thompson-Ruffin’s mixed-media fabric print depicts a man-sized black leaf hanging lifelessly from a tree bereft of other leaves, against a blood-red background of squares evoking urban apartments.

Rain Harris makes flowers, some out of silk – but some out of ominous black clay, lending a sense of doom to the idea of traditional floral arrangements.

courtesy: Epsten Gallery at Village Shalom

Finding meaning in contemporary art often depends more on the viewer than on the artist. What you make of the work is up to you. But what words to use?

photo: courtesy of Epsten Gallery

Over the centuries, art and religion...have grown apart. As a Huffington Post writer puts it: "The art world suffers from a secular hangover." But, in recent years, artists are returning to religious subjects and imagery in their artwork.

Kansas City, Mo. – KCUR's Laura Spencer takes a look at two group exhibitions that ask artists to delve into religious objects.