entrepreneurship

Risk and reward are part of the game when it comes to being an entrepreneur, but cracking the code for success requires more than just drive and luck.

On Monday's Up to Date,  the specific skills that can lead to triumph in an innovative venture. From failing wisely to finding the gap, there’s a variety to master.

Guest:

daveynin / Flickr--CC

Kansas City has been named one of the top five cities, globally, for entrepreneurs. So it's no surprise that entrepreneur has become kind of a buzzword around here.

During Central Standard's first Buzz Kill session, small business consultant Dodie Jacobi reflected on widespread misuse of the word and all its permutations.

In a new series called Buzz Kill, Central Standard is looking at Kansas City's buzzwords with the people who best understand the true meaning of our favorite catch-phrases. 

In this installment, we ask what it really means to be an entrepreneur, how you pronounce the word, and how to correctly use it in a sentence. It's an important step for us to take, as a city, if we want to be known for our entr... entrep... entrepreneurial spirit.

Guest:

Flicker-CC

From FitBits to Smart watches and Google Glass, tech developers want to incorporate their products into our everyday uniforms. But as the makers of Google Glass found out in January, creating wearable technology that people actually want to use is harder than they they thought. 

Courtesy Photo / The Lean Lab

Last weekend, innovative minds from all over the Kansas City area competed in Kansas City Startup Weekend EDU.

More than 22 teams pitched their ideas for improving education through technology, and from those, nine were selected to work with mentors and turn them into real-life applications.

The winning team, MYLearningKC is developing an app that will teach Japanese though a game.

Keith Williamson / Flickr, Creative Commons

So, you want to go into business for yourself. Live the dream. Become your own boss. What's the best attitude to have going into it, and what are the practical steps you should take to lay the groundwork? Plus, how to ensure you're building a dream, rather than a nightmare.

Guests:

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Two years ago, metro-area entrepreneurs started buying houses in the first Kansas City, Kan., neighborhood to get Google Fiber.

They wanted to take advantage of the ultra-fast Internet as they launched new ventures in what quickly became known as the Kansas City Startup Village.

The plan was to create a community of entrepreneurs on either side of State Line Road. But because the two states have different economic incentives for new businesses, many entrepreneurs gravitated toward the Kansas side of the Startup Village.

Lean Lab

The Sprint Accelerator, is a sleek, modern communal work space occupying two floors of an old brick building in Kansas City’s Crossroads neighborhood. It has white board walls and tables for entrepreneurs to sketch out their ideas. It features massive oddly shaped chairs, lots of sunlight, and the startup-requisite game room featuring indoor shuffleboard and foosball.

Since the 1970s, small businesses have provided a net of two-thirds of all new jobs. Today, they create 55 percent of all jobs in this country. Three local entrepreneurs, who make up part of this trend, appeared on Up to Date to talk about about starting and sustaining a small business in the Kansas City area.

Photoguyinmo / Flickr-CC

Whether it’s a bakery or a tech firm, running your own business is no cakewalk. Developing one from the ground up takes a lot of hard work and planning.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with some local entrepreneurs about how they got started, the difficulties they encounter and what the future might hold for them. We also talk about why their relationship with the community matters so much and how they stay profitable. 

Guests:

Cody Newill / KCUR

A new program is taking an entrepreneurial approach to tackling the longstanding problem of education in Kansas City, Mo. 

The Lean Lab at the Sprint Accelerator will announce six projects to help area schools Friday afternoon. 

For the past four weeks, fellows at the Lean Lab have been cooking up practical, simple ideas to reinvigorate education in Kansas City.

For example, one fellow is working on a grading system that will use smartphones and tablets to help track students' progress assignment by assignment. 

Jamie Burks / The Good Food Blog

At a farm in Kansas City, Kan., a group of young men from are developing their entrepreneurship skills through farming. Boys Grow, a non-profit agency, works with these kids to develop business skills as they sell their agricultural commodities.

On Wednesday's Central Standard, we talked to two of these boys about their experience with Boys Grows and their hopes for the future.

Guests:

Google Images - CC

Last month, the city of Kansas City, Mo., opened what they’re calling a 'Dead Letter Office,' which is actually a website where the residents and business owners can petition to repeal out-of-date city regulations.

Assistant City Manager Rick Usher focuses on small businesses and entrepreneurship. He says due to Kansas City’s long history, some of the old rules are still in the books.

“Kansas City you know we’re over 150 years old. The city has weathered every economic, political, social, environmental crisis that has occurred through those times,” Usher said.

If figuring out how to fix education in Kansas City is a puzzle, then the founders of The Lean Lab say their fellowships should provide the pieces.

"Each fellow has to commit to impacting 500 students over the course of five years," says Carrie Markel, the group's chief operating officer. "If we incubate 20 fellows a year, in less than 20 years we would impact all 70,000 students in the Kansas City city limits."

Cara McClain / KCUR

Entrepreneurship group 1Week KC wants to make Kansas City a top destination for innovative businesses and start-ups, a goal they're promoting with a week-long celebration that began Monday.

The obstacles and challenges that entrepreneurs face are wide and varied, but here is what some of the people who attended this week's events had to say about the climate in Kansas City:

Biswarup Ganguly / Wikimedia Commons

This week, innovators in mobile technology descend upon Kansas City for the Mobile Midwest conference hosted by Kansas City IT Professionals (KCITP.) Among them is Raj Singh, the developer of a mobile calendar application that goes beyond storing and retrieving scheduling information. This application is actually designed to help you make your appointments, arrive at meeting places and in some cases, communicate with your colleagues to let them know you're running late.

Kauffman Foundation

A recent Forbes.com article headline touted “11 Reasons 2014 Will Be A Breakout Year For Women Entrepreneurs.” 

And, indeed, the statistics are looking good.

People have ideas for inventions all the time, but getting those ideas made into consumer products can be a difficult journey.

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with a representative of Quirky.com, a website that connects the entrepreneurs with the means to produce their ideas.

Guest:

  • Nathaniel Padgett, Quirky.com
John Fischer / Creative Commons

Picture this: a group of "buspreneurs" convene on a bus equipped with laptops and just three days to create a startup company. That is what happened when the area's best hackers, hustlers and hipsters got on the Midwest StartupBus. They also made stops in Nashville, Tenn., and Fort Smith, Ark., along the way.

KCPT's Caitlin Cress went along for the ride, which began right here in Kansas City on March 2.

Guest:

  • Caitlin Cress, reporter at the Hale Center for Journalism at KCPT

What is Global Entrepreneurship Week?

It’s a mash-up of dozens of classes, speakers, workshops and competitions that extend through Saturday in Kansas City. Other cities across the U.S. and 139 different countries also are sponsoring a Global Entrepreneurship Week to celebrate innovators and startups.

Some of the highlights from the week in Kansas City:

A kind of entrepreneurial love fest is happening across the world this week. Global entrepreneurship is being celebrated in Kansas City, across the United States and in 139 countries around the world.

The event, called 'Global Entrepreneurship Week,' is a mash up of events, workshops and competitions celebrating innovative startups.

reddirtshop.com

Imagine starting a business for any other reason but to make a profit. There is a subset of business owners who do just that ... social entrepreneurs.

These executives look to organize, create and manage a venture to make social change. On Friday's Up to Date we examine social enterprise: from what drives someone to start a business aimed at bettering the lives of others, to the process of taking an idea all the way to market, to how the funds find their way to worthwhile causes.

Guests:

Barnett Helzberg, Jr. had a mentor. His name was Ewing Kauffman, the one-time owner of the Kansas City Royals.

Presidential Policies and Black Entrepreneurship

Apr 30, 2012
Wichita State University

An American president once said that black power is the power that people should have over their own destinies, the power that comes from participation in the political and economic process of society. That president? Richard Nixon.

Computer Guys: Tech Tools For Entrepreneurs

Mar 26, 2012
Maurits Doetjes / Flickr

On this Monday's Central Standard, a look at the technology tools available to help you launch your new business.