end of life care

  

Attitudes about hospice and palliative care have changed dramatically over the last 40 years, and the number of patients who receive this type of treatment has expanded. Two longtime leaders in the field, though, acknowledge that more work is needed to ease the pain and suffering of the most ailing patients.

Guests:

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

Guests:

Death And Dying: Advocates Seek State Laws

Jul 10, 2015

Editor’s note:  On Wednesday, Medicare, announced that it would reimburse doctors for end-of-life counseling. It’s part of an emerging conversation about end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. 

Death And Dying: Expanding Palliative Care

Jul 10, 2015
Mike Shields / KHI News Service

Editor’s note: On Wednesday, Medicare, announced that it would reimburse doctors for end-of-life counseling. It’s part of an emerging conversation about end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. This three-part series of stories by KHI News Service, and a video produced in partnership with Kansas City public television station KCPT, is about that conversation and the role that experts at two regional institutions are playing in it.

Death And Dying: An Emerging Conversation

Jul 10, 2015
Bill Snead / KHI News Service

Editor’s note: On Wednesday, Medicare, announced that it would reimburse doctors for end-of-life counseling. It’s part of an emerging conversation about end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. 

University of Kansas Medical Center

Note: KCUR will run a series of stories Friday on end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. 

This week’s announcement that the federal government is proposing Medicare reimbursements for doctors who discuss end-of-life plans with their patients was one Christian Sinclair has been waiting for.

Will Taylor / Flickr, Creative Commons

It's one of life's great inevitables, and we don't mean taxes.

Death Cafes, where people get together to hang out and talk about death and dying, have started popping up in cities worldwide. Locally, we have two Death Cafes: one in St. Joseph, Mo. and another in Kansas City, Mo. 

Bioethics is a heavy issue to the average person, and most of us prefer not to think about death. But having a plan in place for when the worst happens is crucial.

Photo courtesy of Regina Holliday

When Regina Holliday’s husband, Frederick Allen Holliday II, went to the hospital in 2009, he was already at the end stages of kidney cancer.

The next two months were “a roller coaster,” she recalls. But during that time, Holliday remembers receiving a lot of cards from friends and loved ones.

Mostly of the “get well” type.