Donald Trump

First, the final reactions to last night’s presidential debate from KCUR's panel of undecided voters. Then, a survivor of the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, recalls that fateful day. Finally, Brian McTavish presents his latest Weekend To-Do-List.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton speak separately in Iowa in September.
John Pemble; Clay Masters / IPR

While the third and final presidential debate set for Wednesday evening will surely be marked by the candidates’ disagreements, a forum debating their positions on food and farm issues Wednesday morning was notable for showcasing where the nominees agree.


This year’s presidential race may be one for the history books. But it’s not the contest Kansas voters wanted.

When Republicans caucused in March they overwhelmingly preferred Texas Sen. Ted Cruz over eventual nominee Donald Trump.

Kansas Democrats gave Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders one of his biggest primary victories – a 68 percent to 32 percent drubbing of Hillary Clinton.

Hannah Figgs-Hoard was among a group of Sanders supporters at a Topeka caucus site that literally overwhelmed Clinton’s smaller contingent.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

While the mud flies between the major party presidential candidates, the Smart Money Experts are focused on the issues. Today, we review the proposed tax and economic policies from both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

flattop341 / Flickr - CC

Football season… baseball season… none is as seemingly endless as election season. This one has been particularly nasty, brutish and long—and now, as Victor Wishna explains in “A Fan’s Notes,” it’s bullied its way into the sports headlines, too.

When Donald Trump explained his remarks on grabbing women as "locker room talk," some women responded by sharing their own stories of survival. Has the conversation on sexual assault and the casual objectification of women reached a tipping point?

Plus, Question Quest finds out what's in the center of the United States.


With the presidential campaigns reaching a fever pitch, the Media Critics discuss whether or not journalists hold Hillary Clinton to a different standard than Donald Trump, and if the press is giving political "spin" the same importance as evidence-based facts. Then, Bill Brownlee introduces Various Blonde in this week's Local Listen.

First, local undecided voters react to the slug fest that was the second presidential debate. Then, a look at a few measures on the Missouri 2016 ballot concerning cigarette taxes and establishing ID requirements for voting. 

First, the Ethics Professors decide whether complaining about politics without casting a vote is something to feel guilty about, and discuss the morals of disclosing Donald Trump's old tax returns without his permission. Finally, Brian McTavish gives us a rundown of the latest Weekend To-Do List.

We begin with a look at the many challenges media outlets face when, under increasing scrutiny from all sides, they are covering a presidential race unlike any other.

Lindsborg Police Department

A man involved in a racist incident at a rural Kansas college has been trying to gain a foothold in state politics.

The chalk outlines of bodies and messages including, “Make Lindsborg White Again," scrawled on Bethany College sidewalks earlier this month rattled the campus and surrounding community

A police report of the chalkings from Sept. 3 names Gabriel James Wilson as a suspect.

Of the millions who watched last night's presidential debate, eight undecided voters from the Kansas City area watched from KCUR's studios. UMKC's Division of Diversity and Inclusion Vice Chancellor Susan Wilson invited them to see if what they heard influenced how they would vote. Susan shares what she found with Up to Date host Steve Kraske.

Democratic strategist and pollster Celinda Lake says Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both know women will play an important role in the 2016 election, and they need to win them over by November. Lake says women and men look for different things, so the candidates will need a multifaceted approach to win.

Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts says the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is crucial for farmers wanting access to new and growing markets. But in the midst of the presidential campaign the deal faces an uphill battle.

Speaking on a panel at the Kansas State Fair Saturday, Roberts, who is the Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman, distinguished the TPP from other trade deals. He says the agriculture industry stands to benefit too much for it to be allowed to fail.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

Hillary Clinton brought her campaign for president to the National Baptist Convention USA in Kansas City, Missouri, on Thursday. The Democratic nominee used gospel verses and personal stories to distinguish herself from Donald Trump.

People attending the convention are almost entirely African-American, conservative, middle-aged and dressed to the nines. In her address, Clinton, a life-long Methodist, quoted scripture to knowing smiles and nods. Some audience members even recited lines along with her. 

As St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay sees it, the crowd that packed Hillary Clinton’s new local office Tuesday night could help persuade her Democratic presidential campaign to direct more attention — and resources to Missouri.

Win or lose, such action could help the state’s entire Democratic ticket.

“We need to show the support is here, to pull her over the top,’’ Slay told reporters, shortly before addressing the shoulder-to-shoulder audience that spilled onto the sidewalk outside the Clinton campaign office at 4039 Lindell Blvd.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has tapped two veteran GOP operatives to head up his state operation.

Aaron Willard, who has held several key posts in the Republican-controlled General Assembly, is Trump’s new state director. Todd Abrajano, a consultant with similar GOP ties, is to serve as Trump’s communications director.

White Christians set the tone for this country, dating back to its founding. But that’s changing in some profound ways. For one thing, white Christians no longer comprise a majority of the nation. As the cultural and religious ground shifts under them we’ll see how their influence is changing.


The Comedy Trio Behind "Drunk Trump" Videos

Jul 20, 2016

The first "Drunk Trump" video has captured over 1.2 million views since it was posted to YouTube last October. We talk with the comedy trio behind its creation and learn what the inspiration was for that and the other videos they create through their Friend Dog Studios.


The Role Of Populism In 2016 Politics

Jun 30, 2016

Between Donald Trump and the Brexit, there is a wave of populism sweeping Western democracies this year. We explore what's behind it and who it represents. 


  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas. 
  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor in political science at the University of Kansas. 
Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

U.S. Congressman Kevin Yoder says it remains to be seen if Kansans will back presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump in November.

Though Yoder has endorsed Trump, he waited to do so until after Ted Cruz and other candidates had dropped out of the race.

“My position is I support the nominee,” says Yoder.

Yoder says while Trump wasn’t his first choice, he doesn’t think Hillary Clinton reflects Kansas values.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

A Kansas City Council committee ended in a shouting match Wednesday after about 30 people showed up to protest police brutality.

Melissa Stiehler told the Neighborhood and Public Safety Committee police used excessive force to disperse a crowd that gathered outside the Midland Theater March 12 to protest Donald Trump. She said she was pepper sprayed across the chest.

“The way that not only the Kansas City police acted at the Trump rally but the response from our mayor and Chief Forte sets a really dangerous precedent,” Stiehler said.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

From the Country Club District to Midtown, Independence to the West Side, to east of Prospect and north of the river, Kansas Citians on the Missouri side were voting at the crack of dawn today.

Polls opened at 6 a.m. Shelly Freeman entered her polling place at Country Club Christian Church in the dark, thanks to daylight savings time.

"Every election is important," she says. "As a woman we had to fight to get the vote."

She sees this year as exceptional — not necessarily because of the unusual level of hostile rhetoric between the candidates.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Just a day after canceling a rally in Chicago due to violence and unrest, GOP front-runner Donald Trump came to the Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland in downtown Kansas City on Saturday to try to boost his chances of winning Missouri's Republican primary.

The variety of candidates running for President means lots of choices for the electorate.  So, what factors influence our vote? From party affiliation to electability, we look at what considerations play into our voting decisions.


  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas.
  • Robert Rowland is a professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas.

In one week, the hypothesizing and conjecturing will stop — at least for a moment as real voters express their preferences for the presidency at the Iowa Caucuses. On this edition of Up To Date, political experts David von Drehle and Carl Cannon talk with Steve Kraske about the 2016 presidential race.

This was an incredible year for journalists —  from the battle to legalize gay marriage, to the student protests at the University of Missouri and then, of course, Donald Trump. The Media Critics discuss how the biggest stories of the year were covered and how the public perceives the industry.


When Karl Rove set out to win the White House with George W. Bush in 2000, the role model he used for guidance had been dead for nearly a century. On this edition of Up To Date, Rove talks about  the "revolutionary" William McKinley and weighs in on Donald Trump's presidential prospects.

KCUR's Political Pundits join Steve Kraske to discuss the ascendant Donald Trump, and the second GOP presidential debate.


  • Dave Helling is the Kansas City Star's political reporter.
  • Burdett Loomis is a professor of political scientist at the University of Kansas.
  • Jessica Lee is an assistant professor at KU's School of Business.

The latest variant of the presidential election parlor game we call "What Were They Thinking?" asks why Mitt Romney chose this moment in his quest for the White House to become involved with Donald Trump.

Here's a contrarian guess by way of an answer: populism. Bear with me for a moment of explanation.