development

Eleanor Klibanoff / KCUR

After years spent battling landlords and management, residents of a Kansas City, Kansas public housing complex await promised vouchers for housing of their choice. What will happen when, and if, they get off that steep hill?

Christina Lieffring

Metcalf South and Indian Springs were built when indoor shopping malls were cropping up all over the United States. Both rose to prominence and became destinations during the same time period of the late 1970s and early '80s. But they declined for very different reasons, which reverberate in the aftermath and redevelopment of their spaces. 

Matt Rahner

Kansas City's new east side police station and crime lab on Prospect and 27th Street is still under construction — the campus is slated to open next year. Meanwhile, the city is still facing litigation over how the four-block area was selected for the campus, and how the people who lived there were moved to make way for the new construction.

Starting in the fall of 2012, photographer Matt Rahner documented the residents of the Wendell-Phillips neighborhood between Prospect and Brooklyn avenues and 26th and 27th streets. He wanted to capture the final months before the demolition of their homes.

Roeland Park is a self-governing city in a 1.6-mile radius. Locals know it as a convenient place to stock up on carloads of stuff at big box stores. Or as the site of the Mexican Price Chopper. Some know it as the city that passed a non-discrimination ordinance protecting the LGBT community. But what is Roeland Park like from the inside?

Guests:

  • Tom Madigan, community member
  • Teresa Kelly, councilmember and "chicken lady", Roeland Park Ward 4
Brian Hillegas / Flickr

There's talk of a West Bottoms revitalization. But the truth is, every fifteen years or so, the industrial stockyards district experiences a new kind of renaissance. In the 80s and 90s, it was an underground arts thing. Now, it's food, festivals and antiques. Meanwhile, industry and architecture have maintained a quiet presence all along. From art to antiques, can revivals of the recent past inform the future of the district?

Guests:

Americasroof / Wikipedia

Westport has always been at a crossroads. So says urban design specialist Daniel Serda, noting that the historic neighborhood has been changing since its beginnings. But news of three chain restaurants entering the neighborhood where prime parking spots now stand has sparked a heated response, not just from Westport residents and business owners, but people throughout Kansas City who are passionate about the entertainment district.

Guests:

Lane4 Property Group

The new owners of the Metcalf South Shopping center have submitted plans for its redevelopment.

Last week, they announced their new, multi-purpose vision for the center incorporating luxury apartments, restaurants, shops and office space.

Kansas City’s Lane4 Property Group and The Kroenke Group of Columbia purchased the center in February, 2014. The same year the Metcalf South Mall, which has long been mostly vacant, officially closed.

Joel Marquardt / City of Roeland Park

For more than 20 years, limestone caves and an old swimming pool at 48th Street and Roe Avenue in Roeland Park, Kan., have sat vacant.

But city officials are starting to float new ideas about how to use the space.

At a city council meeting earlier this month, Roeland Park Mayor Joel Marquardt showed off conceptual drawings that would change the limestone cave formation into a hub for restaurants and bars. The concept is similar in design to Kansas City’s Power & Light District.

The pre-opening hype would be hard to deny. Just ask the people who spent two nights camping out to be among the first to enter the new Merriam IKEA on opening day. So what is the IKEA story, and how do we expect the global furniture retailer to affect the local economy?

Guests:

For the uninitiated, IKEA is just a big furniture store.

But for those in the Kansas City area who have been to IKEA before, the grand opening of a new store in Merriam, Kan., on Sept. 10 is a big deal. The Swedish furniture chain is allowing people to line up 48 hours before the Merriam store opens. And they will.

Why? Well, because of all the possibilities.

Courtesy: Hoefer Wysocki Architecture

A Kansas City council committee approved zoning changes for a 14-story office tower on the north edge of the Country Club Plaza on Wednesday. There appears to be no organized effort to stop its construction.

In recent years, plans for a North-Plaza law office high-rise and a luxury hotel were derailed by opposition. But this time there is no business opposition and Dan Cofran of Friends of the Plaza says his group does not want to stop or delay the Block Real Estate project.

Vincent Parsons / Flickr Creative Commons

An Indianapolis firm has been chosen to develop the first phase of the Berkley Riverfront Development. The deal between the Port Authority of Kansas City and Flaherty & Collins marks the starting point for the Authority’s master plan to create “a world class urban village” on a 55-acre site. When finished there will be apartments, parking, office space, and retail shopping. On Thursday's Up to Date Steve Kraske finds out the details of the Berkley Riverfront Development.

Guests:

Cerner Corporation

Home construction skyrocketed 88% over last year's developments this April. In the second half of Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Kansas City Star development reporter Kevin Collison about the jump in growth in the metro area.

We'll look at Cerner's expanded office campus where the Bannister Mall once stood, a new $50 million River Market apartment complex, and UMKC's site near the Kauffman Center for the Conservatory of Music.

Guest:

Wikipedia / Google Images -- CC

The West Bottoms is an industrial area directly west of downtown Kansas City, located at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers.  It is one of the oldest areas of the city, and the original home of two of the region's key industries: beef and railroads.

Mike Kalasnik/Flickr-CC

Kansas City seems to be building its way to an economic recovery. Take, for instance, Cerner's proposed redevelopment of the property that formerly housed Bannister Mall -- with office buildings that could potentially house 15,000 new jobs. 

The Kansas City Business Journal

While the announcement that Swedish furniture retailer Ikea was the big story in area development for 2012 for its many fans in the metro, there was a lot more news about business growth the past year.

KC Momentum / KCMomentum.com

Kansas City has a problem with vacant homes. 12,000 of them dot neighborhoods around town. Legislation that Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed this year is designed to provide a new solution: a land bank.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

North Kansas City took the first step toward creating a new sprawling business development Thursday, when a demolition crew began destroying a century-old Archer Daniels Midland mill.

The hulking gray mill sits on 58 acres of prime land at the intersection of 210 highway and I-35. The city hopes a developer will re-tool the land and create a large mixed-use development that could include medical offices, retail stores and possibly even some residential units.

Whether it's the opening of a beacon of the performing arts, a shopping mall revived from near death, a business fleeing one side of the state for the other, or a law firm's attempt to build a new office structure on the Country Club Plaza, it's been a busy year in development across the Kansas City region.

Creative Commons photo via <a href=\"http://www.flickr.com/people/27150851@N02/\">Bhanu Tadinada</a> on Flickr.

Kansas City, MO – The Country Club Plaza has seen plenty of changes its nearly ninety years, but none of have sparked as much public passion as the recent announcement of new building plans by the law firm of Polsinelli Shughart. On August 19th, Plaza owner Highwoods Properties announced it would demolish the Balcony Building on the corner of 47th Street and Broadway to build an eight-story, glass office building.

Revised architectural rendering presented by Polsinelli Shugart law firm.

Kansas City, MO – The historic Plaza "Balcony Building" at 47th and Broadway survives in a new design presented at this afternoon's city council business session. Spencer Thompson of the Polsinelli-Shughart law firm which is to occupy the building explained the new plan.

Thompson said the final design will incorporate as much of the original architecture and Plaza streetscape as possible, and definitely will include the Spanish-style, red-tile roofed tower.

Kansas City, Mo. – A city council committee is recommending that the city council allocate a quarter of a million dollars on an option to buy the block that contains the Power and Light building for a downtown convention hotel.

The planning and zoning committee is sending the full council resolutions to continue studying the possibility of a 1,000 room hotel and to pay New York's Gailord Enterprises $250,000 to take the property off the market for the year or so that study is expected to take.