dental care

Andy Marso / Heartland Health Monitor

University of Kansas researchers plan to use a $1.5 million federal grant to help Kansans with disabilities catch up to their non-disabled peers in several health categories.

Jean Hall, director of KU’s Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies, will lead a team of partners from nonprofit organizations and government agencies to improve physical activity, nutrition and oral health for Kansans with disabilities.

Kansas is one of 19 states to get the grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Earlier this year, 69-year-old Aneita McCloskey needed her two front teeth filed down and capped.

“They were kind of worn down and they were also getting little tears and cavities,” she recalls.

Without dental insurance, McCloskey is on the hook for the full $2,400 cost of the procedure. She was given 18 months to pay it before she gets charged interest. That’ll be hard to do on her fixed income.

In years past she would have had to wait to see the dentist again until she could afford it.


Janet Rogers / UMKC

The National Institutes of Health has awarded up to $4.38 million in research money to the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s dental and nursing schools to address disparities in oral health among Kansas schoolchildren.

A decision to accredit so-called mid-level dental providers by a national agency that oversees dental education programs may boost efforts to license them in Kansas.

The Commission on Dental Accreditation says that without national accreditation standards for mid-level dental providers — also known as dental therapists — the requirements would vary from state to state.

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

Imagine waiting in line for a day and a half just to get a tooth pulled or a cavity filled. Lots of people did just that over the weekend in Salina, where about 400 dental professionals and hundreds of other volunteers donated their time Friday and Saturday to provide free dental care to 1,400 people at the 14th Kansas Mission of Mercy.

Hamed Saber / Flickr-CC

  When it comes to your pet's health, its dental hygiene is just as important as your own.  Brushing your pet's teeth can prevent disease, and perhaps more importantly...bad breath.

We talk about keeping your pet's pearly whites sparkling, from dental-specific kibble design, to brushing techniques, and pet oral rinses. 

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

When Alan and Cindy Reed started devoting their evenings and weekends to going door-to-door to talk with their Salina neighbors about an upcoming vote on water fluoridation, they considered avoiding houses with the blue “Stop Fluoride” signs.

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

 

About 6 percent of eligible adults took advantage of new dental coverage offered under KanCare in the first year of the managed care Medicaid program.

The switch to managed care Medicaid administered by three private companies extended basic dental cleanings to more than 130,000 adults ages 19 to 64.

According to Kansas Department of Health and Environment statistics, about 7,600 adults had a cleaning paid for by one of the managed care companies in 2013.

Mike Sherry / The Hale Center for Journalism

Missouri’s new state dental director has been on board for about half a year, and during a visit to Kansas City on Wednesday, he outlined a number of initiatives aimed at making the state a national leader in oral health.

“I want (other states) to come to us,” Dr. B. Ray Storm said at a meeting of the Oral Health Access Committee, which is part of a regional health initiative through the Mid-America Regional Council. “Let us be the guiding light for the rest of the country.”

cloud_nine / Flickr-CC

Cavity-free, pearly-white teeth have long been a status symbol—but how important is it to make sure your pet’s choppers are as pristine as yours?

On Monday's Up to Date, we’ll talk with  Wayne Hunthausen, DVM and veterinarian Scott MacGee who specializes in pet dentistry. We’ll find out just what’s normal for your pet's teeth and, as always, take questions about your companion animal's health and habits.

Guests:

Finizio/Flickr--CC

A two-year investigation by the U.S. Senate concludes that so-called dental management companies have provided substandard care to low-income children covered by Medicaid, while over billing the joint federal-state program.

A new report by the Pew Charitable Trusts bolsters the argument that dental access challenges in Kansas require a new type of dental provider.

The report lists the ten states with the most severe shortage of dentists, and the ten states where low-income children are least likely to receive dental care. Kansas is not on either of those lists.

Still, nearly 55 percent of Kansas kids covered by Medicaid received no dental care in 2011. The report also reveals that more than 16 percent of the state’s population is underserved, and living in a dental shortage area.

The Case for Dental Health

Mar 5, 2013

A yearly physical is the norm for most of us, whether for children or their adult parents, and it's considered a part of living a healthy lifestyle. But not all areas of health are examined by one doctor, and one area of our health that is often neglected is oral health.

Bryan Thompson / Kansas Public Radio

A daily digest of headlines from KCUR:
Event Provides Free Dental Care To 2,100 People, Ron Paul Visits Kansas City & Farmers Play The Commodities Market With Grain Bins.