Charlotte Street Foundation

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Moving back to Kansas City from New York City in the mid to late 1980s was an eye-opening experience for David Hughes.

"I started meeting artists, curators, dancers and musicians. I saw a lot of amazing individuals doing interesting work," says Hughes, who realized that "artists need support." 

American Century Investments, his employer at the time, contributed $10,000. And, in 1997, four cash awards were distributed to artists as the newly created Charlotte Street Foundation

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Since its establishment in 1997, the Charlotte Street Foundation has distributed over $1.1 million to provide resources for Kansas City artists, including unrestricted grants and free exhibition and studio space. Today we examine what impact the foundation has had in strengthening and maintaining existing local talent, and in attracting it from around the country.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Fermentation is a local and national obsession right now, from kimchi to kombucha to home brewing. We check in with a few members of our community with an affinity for the sour, and an artist who's collecting sourdough starters for an installation piece at the Charlotte Street Foundation.

Plus, how one local author believes we can tap into all 54 of our senses.

Megan Mantia

Lynnette Miranda is never quite sure what art will be in the shows she curates. Miranda, a Miami native who’s six months into an 18-month stint as the Charlotte Street Foundation's curator-in-residence, says she curates artists, not art objects.

Amy Kligman, executive/artistic director of the Charlotte Street Foundation, says the news StartUp program will provide critical early support for arts startups.
Courtesy Charlotte Street Foundation

When you think of a startup, a technology startup is probably what first comes to mind. But the Charlotte Street Foundation has focused on the arts for 20 years, and just launched a StartUp Residency program. It's designed to help up-and-coming arts startups, such as an artist-run collaborative or a new business.

Courtesy and copyright of the Mildred Thompson Estate, Atlanta, GA

The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri, received some welcome news in this first week of the new year: a $50,000 grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Photocapy / Flickr -- CC

What do ancient religious rituals mean to millennials? Across faiths, people are following the rituals of their parents and grandparents, but the meaning they attach to those practices may be changing.

Plus, a chat with the curator of an exhibit, ¿Qué Pasa, USA?, which features artists of color who are using humor to explore questions of race and belonging.

Guests:

Charlotte Street Foundation

Rodolfo Marron is an artist who grew up in the 1990s, on Kansas City's West Side. It was a grittier place back then, he says. For an escape, he started creating characters who inspired him. Now, he draws on Kansas City stories and the materials that grow wild in backyards and along highways.

Guest:

Courtesy Archive Collective

Cellphone photo enthusiasts have a few more days to shape one of the pieces of art in a downtown Kansas City gallery.

Instagram users who post photos with the hashtag #bigamericanpicture can see their images on a computer screen mounted to a wall and hooked up to an iPad showing the feed of a group of Kansas City photographers called the Archive Collective.

“So anyone who uses the hashtag can be present in the show,” says Archive Collective member Megan Pobywajlo.

courtesy of the artist

Charlotte Street Foundation has announced its 2016 slate of awards recipients. Each artist receives an unrestricted cash award of $10,000. 

The five fellows this year include: visual artists Shawn Bitters, Rodolfo Marron III, and Madeline Gallucci, and generative performing artists J. Ashley Miller and Eddie Moore. 

The awards process starts with an open call for applications from artists based in the five-county metro area. A jury of arts professionals narrowed the pool to 18 finalists, and then to five. 

Courtesy of Charlotte Street

This Tuesday might be a school night, but it’s also a special occasion, one that, if we're truly in touch with our existential status in the natural world, deserves a ritual. It’s the autumnal equinox, when the sun shines directly on the equator and the lengths of the day and the night are essentially equal.

Two Kansas City musicians want to help celebrate, so they’re putting on a sleeping-bag concert. They did the same thing for the spring equinox six months ago.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Betse Ellis  has played the fiddle in Kansas City for a long time, with her old band the Wilders, as a solo act, now in her duo Betse & Clarke. She’s been on national TV. She’s toured the country.

“I’ve been a professional performing artist for 15-plus years, muddling through the best way I knew how from one year to the next,” Ellis says. “There are many things I get about the business of being an artist but there are so many things I really don’t know. I need help.”

Courtesy Black House Collective

Five Kansas City artists will receive $10,000 in unrestricted cash as this year's winners of the Charlotte Street Awards. The awards went to three visual artists and two generative performing artists.

The Charlotte Street Foundation has been giving cash to selected artists for more than 15 years — the visual artist awards began in 1997; the foundation added awards for performing artists in 2008. In total, Charlotte Street has now awarded $700,500 to Kansas City artists, recognizing their accomplishments and encouraging their continued development and achievement.

"Problems are the gasoline that runs the self-help car." So says David Wayne Reed, who wrote the play Help Yourself. On the heels of a discussion of this darkly humorous new play, a librarian and a psychologist discuss the self-help genre, its history and the human condition that fuels it. Is change possible? And when might acceptance be just as important?

Guests:

EG Schempf

Danny Orendorff arrived in Kansas City a year ago to serve as Curator-in-Residence for the Charlotte Street Foundation. Before he arrived in town for this rotating position, his career was split between San Francisco and Chicago.

With a year of close observation under his belt, Danny Orendorff shares his notes on Kansas City's strengths and weaknesses as an art city. He also tells us about his current exhibition at La Esquina gallery, provocatively titled The Stench of Rotting Flowers

jaeschol / Flickr-CC

Got a case of the blahs? Brian McTavish has just the thing to spice up your weekend at get you out of that funk with his Weekend To-Do List for April 25-27.

Diana Ross (Pop), 7 p.m. Sunday at the Midland Theater, 1228 Main, Kansas City, Mo. Tickets: $58 to $178 

Matt Kleinmann Photography

On Monday, the Charlotte Street Foundation announced the 2014 visual and performing artist awards. A Charlotte Street award is always a welcome surprise to artists - in part, because it provides $10,000 in unrestricted cash.

Sabrina Staires / Courtesy of Charlotte Street Foundation

After more than a decade with the Charlotte Street Foundation, artistic director Kate Hackman is leaving the organization.

According to a release Wednesday, after her final day on June 30, Hackman will "explore new opportunities after a period of rest and travel."

"I'm proud of the work we've done over the past decade, and the time seems right for me to move on," Hackman said in the release.

Hackman grew up in Virginia and New York, and earned a B.A. in Art History from Williams College.

courtesy of Joshua Ferdinand

Artist Paul Anthony Smith is riding the wave of early success. Just a few years after graduating from the Kansas City Art Institute, Smith was invited to do a one –person show at the ZieherSmith Gallery in New York.   Recently, Smith was listed by the Huffington Post as one of America’s top 30 black artists under 40. His paintings take a fresh look at the lives of everyday people in his home country of Jamaica.  

Sabrina Staires / Courtesy of Charlotte Street Foundation

Her three-decade career working with arts and cultural organizations has taken her to cities across the country, and into Canada. But, for most of her adult life, Julie Dalgleish has been based in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area - until now.

Dalgleish moved to Kansas City in August, as the new executive director of the Charlotte Street Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1997 by David Hughes – it provides fellowships, residencies, studios, and exhibitions for Kansas City artists. She talked about what encouraged her to make the move.

Sabrina Staires / Courtesy of Charlotte Street Foundation

Charlotte Street Foundation today announced its new executive director: Julie Gordon Dalgleish, a 30-year veteran of arts and cultural organizations and foundations.

The search started in 2012 after Charlotte Street's founder and co-director David Hughes announced he'd step down.

Artists Combat Gun Violence With Creativity

Aug 1, 2013
The Light in the Other Room / Artists for Life/Rocket Grants

This hour on Central Standard, we talked with Darryl Chamberlain, Martice Smith and George Mayfield of Artists for Life, a coalition of African American artists who hope to raise awareness about handgun violence with their work in Kansas City.

courtesy: A. Bitterman

The Kansas City metropolitan area has had its share of controversies over the years when it comes to public art. Remember the 2012 petition drive to remove the statue of the headless bare-breasted woman at the Overland Park Arboretum? Or the artists who were encouraged to drop arrows from their terrazzo flooring design at KCI, so as not to confuse travelers?

Josephine Moynihan / Special to KCUR

Like any city of its size, Kansas City was designed and developed on an urban grid of streets and boulevards in order to make the city work. The Charlotte Street Foundation is currently presenting a month-long multimedia project that features nearly 40 artists who, in their own way, address how the city's layout is both influential, essential, and an ever-mysterious labyrinth. 

courtesy of the artist

Three artists. $10,000 each in unrestricted cash gifts. The Charlotte Street Foundation - a nonprofit supporting Kansas City artists through exhibitions, studio spaces and residencies, and fellowships - has announced its 2013 Visual Artist Award fellows.

courtesy: Charlotte Street Foundation

Charlotte Street Foundation founder David Hughes announced today he would be stepping down as Co-Director in mid-2013, after the selection of a new Executive Director.

Steve Walker/KCUR

Since 2008, the Charlotte Street Foundation has recognized creative Kansas Citians who, within their various genres, consistently produce original and innovative work that often falls outside the mainstream. 

Jazz Meets Gamelan

May 15, 2012
Alex Smith / KCUR

 For the last two and a half years, the Black House Improviser’s Collective has made its home in an unoccupied floor of a downtown office building provided by the Charlotte Street Foundation.

Charlotte Street Foundation recently announced two artists, Heidi Van and Patrick Alonzo Conway, were selected as this year's 2012 Generative Performing Artists Award Fellows.

A Call For Arts Criticism In KC

Mar 6, 2012

On this Wednesday's Central Standard, a conversation about the importance of art criticism in the process of art-making and reception. We’ll hear why a San Francisco arts publication called Art Practical devoted an entire issue to our local scene.

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