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Remember the last time you had a mosquito bite, an allergy ridden nose, or a rash. The sensation that makes these small ailments torments is the desire to itch and experience that sweet relief following the act of scratching.

But much of what we experience when we feel an urge to itch is actually deep in the brain. On Wednesday's Central Standard we'll look at the science of itching and take a look into the the pain and mystery behind migraine headaches.

John A. Beal

It’s not just your abs that need a regular workout— it’s essential for your brain too. But how do you pump iron with your noodle?

Would you be able to recognize the symptoms of a stroke? If you can, you may be able to save someone’s life.

The brains of people who grow up speaking two languages are wired differently, and those differences protect them from dementia as they age.

That's the news from two studies out this month from a scientist in Canada who has spent decades trying to figure out whether being bilingual is bad or good. "I've been doing this for 25 years," Ellen Bialystok, a distinguished research professor of psychology at York University in Toronto, tells Shots. "Suddenly people are interested. I figure it's because everybody's scared about dementia."