birds

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

Lakeside Nature Center in Kansas City, Mo., is a place where people can get an up-close look at wild animals and plants that surround the area. It’s also one of the largest animal rehabilitation centers in Missouri.

Wild animals are brought in when they lose their habitat, are injured or abandoned. Humans are animal’s biggest threat, but the center is a place where humans are trying to help them out.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

As farmers across the Midwest have simplified the landscape and plowed up grassland to grow more corn and soybeans, habitat for pheasants, quail and other grassland birds has become increasingly scarce and their numbers are falling.

In Nebraska, wild pheasant concentrations have fallen 86 percent since their peak in the 1960s. The pheasant harvest during hunting season in Iowa is off 63 percent from the highs reached in the 1970s. In areas that used to be overrun, you’ll struggle to find a pheasant now.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

The American Crow is a smart and wary social bird with all black feathers, black talons and a black beak. Every once in a while during the winter, you can see thousands of these crows gathering in certain spots around parts of Kansas City.  Over the past 50 years, crows have been congregating more and more in urban environments – and if you’ve been in the middle of a dive-bombing murder, you know they create quite the disturbance.

Nature In The City: Falling Into Autumn

Oct 2, 2012
flickr / Dr.RawheaD

You might've noticed a few tell tale signs of Autumn: the beginnings of fall foliage in the trees, flocks of birds migrating overhead... But one has to wonder, how did all that dry heat this summer affect our natural world as we fall into the Fall season? And how is the lingering drought impacting local wildlife?

On this Wednesday's Central Standard, we take an early Autumn look at Nature in the City with Larry Rizzo, natural history biologist, and Joe Werner, biologist and urban ecologist.

Lenexa,Kansas – Congressional hearings on the salmonella outbreak will take place next week in Washington.

The goal- to try and understand what happened to cause the recent recall of almost half a billion eggs, and subsequent illness of hundreds of people. Congress will further look at ways to prevent an outbreak from happening in the future.

Members of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee will hear from victims of salmonella, as well as poultry producers.

Kansas City, Mo –