Barack Obama

President Barack Obama entered the White House in 2008 espousing change, hope, and a new America. In his latest book, The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House, Chuck Todd of NBC's Meet the Press examines the successes and failures of Obama's presidency. In this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Todd about the politics and psychology of the presidency, and why President Obama has been unable to accomplish more. 

Guest:

Josh Earnest was named White House press secretary five weeks ago, after Jay Carney stepped down.

Earnest, 37, was born and raised in Kansas City and his parents still live here.

“His name describes his demeanor,” President Obama said of Earnest when he was named to the job. “Josh is an earnest guy and you can’t find just a nicer individual, even outside of Washington.”

Nathan Haley / Flickr-CC

The recession hit more than five years ago, but its effects are still rippling through this country-- and that's what President Obama is here to address. In Wednesday morning's speech, he will be talking to a crowd at the Uptown Theater in Kansas City, Mo., about the economic challenges facing middle-class families and why he has taken executive action on issues such as minimum wage.

Up to Date will provide coverage of the event, with a live feed of the speech and post-speech analysis from local experts.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

President Barack Obama will talk about the economy in Kansas City today, focusing on his executive orders that are aimed at helping middle-class families.

Obama touched down in Air Force One shortly after 7 p.m. Tuesday at Kansas City International Airport Wednesday, where an invitation-only crowd of well-wishers greeted President Barack Obama.

(flickr-BeckyF)

President Obama appears to be planning a visit to Kansas City next week.

KCUR’s Steve Kraske tweeted the news Tuesday that Obama will be here next Tuesday and Wednesday.

The White House said Obama will be speaking about the economy and will spend the night here before returning to Washington, D.C. Neither a time and location, nor any other details, have been announced.

Christopher Dilts / Obama for America

If you want to stir the pot of controversy, adding a dash of race and a pinch of politics is a sure way to spice up the discussion.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we discuss how President Obama seems to straddle both political and racial divides and why understanding that tension is crucial to navigating the fractious issues that dominate today’s legislative landscape.

President Lauds KC Ford, Chides Congress

Sep 20, 2013
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

President Barack Obama drew heavily on automotive references as he spread his economic recovery message at the Ford Plant at Liberty, MO  today.  The President also took on Congress’ pitting the debt ceiling against the Affordable Care.

The President told a crowd of mostly auto workers, their families and supporters Congress must raise the debt ceiling or fallout would make America a “deadbeat”  to the world.

Jacob McCleland / KRCU

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt says the United States already missed the point to have a real impact in Syria at the early stages of that country's conflict. 

Speaking at a gas station in Cape Girardeau, the Republican Senator said a no-fly zone early on could have allowed the rebellion to remove Bashar Al-Assad. Now, he says President Obama's decision to send a message to Syria because of chemical weapons attacks is, quote "pretty offensive."

University of Central Missouri

A western Missouri-based educational program was the lure to bring President Barack Obama to speak in Warrensburg last week. The President said so, directly, in his address at University of Central Missouri.

He described the program as a job creator that speeds education for young people without leaving them saddled with student loan debt upon graduation.

The Missouri Innovation Campus began as a collaboration between Metropolitan Community College, a high school and some local businesses. 

Obama's Speech Sparks Discussions On Race

Jul 25, 2013
Christopher Dilts / Obama for America

"Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago." President Obama's words have added a new perspective to the discussion about racial attitudes in the wake of George Zimmerman's acquittal in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

President Obama's Warrensburg speech drew unified and quick disapproval from Republican officials. In one case, the critique came before the president spoke.

The White House was very open in advance about the fact that the president would be urging acceptance of his existing priorities, including investment in education, infrastructure and health care.

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt took advantage of the pre-release information to make a speech of his own on the Senate floor before Air Force One had touched down in his state.

Christopher Dilts / Obama for America

President Obama will visit the University of Kansas on Friday, the university said in a statement.

President Obama hosted House Speaker John Boehner today, spending nearly an hour together in which they reportedly discussed ways to avert the looming "fiscal cliff" of spending cuts and tax hikes that are due to strike at the end of 2012. Boehner left the White House at 6 p.m., ET, apparently without reaching a deal. As Politico reports, the Republican plans to return to his home state of Ohio this weekend.

There has been vigorous public debate this election cycle about the Supreme Court; from the Citizens United case to the Affordable Care Act.

Transcript of President Obama's victory speech in Chicago. Source: Federal News Service

Editor's Note: NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future.

(Cheers, applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBERS: (Chanting.) Four more years! Four more years! Four more years! Four more years! Four more years! Four more years! Four more years! Four more years!

Watch: President Obama's Victory Speech

Nov 7, 2012

Here watch the video of President Obama's victory speech, delivered to roaring crowds very early Wednesday morning in Chicago.

Live Election Coverage From KCUR

Nov 6, 2012
Bill Anderson / KCUR

KCUR has live election coverage starting at 7 p.m. tonight. Tune in to 89.3 FM or follow along online.

(Revised at 5:46 pm ET)

On the final day of the 2012 campaign for the White House, President Obama and Mitt Romney are making the last push for votes in states each believes critical to achieving the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory.

Obama was scheduled to campaign in three swing states, while Romney had events planned in four. The only overlap was in Ohio, considered the linchpin of the election.

In his third debate with President Obama, Mitt Romney dialed up "cool and cautious" on his mood meter. And that tells you a great deal about where this presidential race stands with two weeks to go.

In at least one sense, the final presidential debate of the year looked a lot like the previous ones between Mitt Romney and President Obama.

Regardless of what they were asked, each offered talking points he had prepared and was determined to make. The candidates, not moderator Bob Schieffer of CBS News, set both the tone and the pace of the debate.

That included switching gears far from the nominal subject of Monday's debate in Boca Raton, Fla., which was foreign policy. The domestic economy received at least as much attention and verbiage as Iran, Libya or China.

Foreign policy proved to be a subject that kept the tone mostly substantive tonight in the third and final debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney before the Nov. 6 election.

We've reached an important landmark in the presidential campaign: President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney face off tonight in the third and final presidential debate.

As was the case the last two times, the debate starts at 9 p.m. ET. This time, the venue is Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.

If you believe the snap polls, the first debate went to Romney, the second went to Obama, which means we have a 1-1 tie with just minutes to go in the fourth quarter. That is to say, we're just two weeks away from Nov. 6.

After a zinger of a vice presidential debate last week, the bosses have a lot to live up to tonight. Just in case you haven't been paying attention: President Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney face off in the second of three presidential debates.

It starts at 9 p.m. at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. The town-hall style debate will be moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley.

After what has been universally called a strong Romney victory during round 1, the spotlight is on Obama.

Mitt Romney may have seized the advantage in terms of poll numbers and momentum, but there's one area where President Obama enjoys the upper hand.

In the end, it's the only area that counts: the Electoral College. Over the past 20 years, Republicans have had a much lower ceiling when it comes to electoral support, while Democrats have had a significantly higher floor.

In the next two installments of Solve This, NPR's series on the major issues facing the country, we'll examine each presidential candidate's approach to boosting employment. First, President Obama's strategy, then Mitt Romney's.

Job creation is the centerpiece of President Obama's campaign speeches.

In the five days since Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was declared by many the winner of the first presidential debate, political watchers have waited to see if polls would shift in response to his performance. And, they did.

Mitt Romney may have given his campaign something of a reset with his performance in the first debate against President Obama.

He appeared more comfortable on stage than the incumbent, and was able at least to lay the groundwork for a message of bipartisanship that could appeal to remaining undecided voters.

Presidential Debate: An NPR Live Chat

Oct 3, 2012
wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney face off from Denver Wednesday night in their first televised presidential debate. Jim Lehrer of PBS's Newshour will moderate.

If you're not content to simply yell at the television, join NPR's live chat below to get in your two cents and engage in relevant conversation during the event.

The discussion starts here at 7:30 p.m. CST and live coverage of the debates begins at 8 p.m. on KCUR 89.3 FM and kcur.org/listen-live.

Christopher Dilts / Obama for America

A judge has delayed a lawsuit aimed at taking President Barack Obama off the election ballot. A California attorney had filed a lawsuit on behalf of a Kansas man, arguing that Obama isn't eligible to be president.

Generation Y is asking why.

Why is it so hard to find a job? Why is health care so expensive? Smart questions from a smart generation. Their inquiries — and the presidential candidate they think can provide the best answers — could be a decisive factor in the 2012 election. If not the Tipping Point, as least a Tilting Point.

For many millennials, economic prospects are murky.

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