This American Life

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

In 2011, Cole Lindbergh was 25 and working his dream job as the games manager at the Kansas City amusement park Worlds of Fun. He was walking over 20,000 steps a day, working 60-hour weeks, managing 100 teenage employees and couldn’t have been happier. But, Lindbergh was facing a dilemma: while incredibly happy with the job, it didn’t pay well and the hours weren’t good. It’s a problem that a lot of 25-year-olds could probably relate to, but unlike most, Lindbergh’s story was shared with about 2.1 million listeners on the weekly radio show, This American Life.

Working For Fun

Jul 5, 2016
Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

We all have to work. But does your job have to be a daily grind, or can it be ... joyful? We check in with Kansas City native Cole Lindbergh, who worked his dream job as a games manager at Worlds of Fun for 12 years, and ask about how his life changed after he was profiled for This American Life in 2011.

Guest:

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts

For many, Ira Glass and his program, This American Life, have been a gateway into the public radio world. 

But the radio icon, who has one of the most recognizable voices in the business, claims that it took longer for him to get good at telling stories on the radio than anyone else he knows in the business. 

"I was working in public radio starting when I was 19. I knew I wanted to do radio stories ... but doing it well, it really took me until I was 27 or so until I was a decent writer and reporter, maybe 28 really," he says. 

Walt Bodine Special: Ira Glass

Apr 24, 2012

Join us Tuesday morning for a special Walt Bodine Show from 2004, when Walt chats with fellow storyteller Ira Glass of This American Life about the ins and outs of radio journalism, and what happens when, inevitably, things go awry.