aging

Some seniors in Kansas benefit from programs that allow them to stay in their homes. Now, with state budget cuts, waiting lists are cropping up for those services. This, despite the harsh reality that the state saves money, and lots of it, if seniors can remain in their own residences instead of a nursing home.

Guest:

ceedub13 / Wikimedia Commons

As the post-World War II Baby Boom generation inexorably relaxes its grip on the workplace, many who once rocked the night away still want to hold onto all of the youthful diversions they can. Translation: It’s hard to let go of the fun stuff.

Even if it doesn’t make wrinkles disappear, a virtual industry exists to appease the entertainment desires of those whose cherished memories of yesteryear might still be able to put a spring in their step. Translation: Fountain of Youth for sale.

Baby Boomers are aging and as they retire, challenges like financial concerns and health issues loom ahead. And as one generation begins to slow down, how can their younger counterparts harness their collective knowledge and expertise?

Guest:

When I'm 64: Peggy Pape

Apr 13, 2016
Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Peggy Pape

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Office manager at Parkville Presbyterian Church for 26 years

When I'm 64: Sly James

Apr 13, 2016
Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Sly James

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Mayor

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Marc Inzerillo

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Jon R. Gray

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Lawyer for Shook, Hardy & Bacon

What does 64 feel like? “Feels great. It beats the alternative. The alternative would be to not be 64 and be dead somewhere. What I can honestly say is I am truly living the best time of my life.”

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Linda Salvay

Residence: Overland Park, Kansas

Occupation: “I’m discovering my next career as we speak because for most of my career I’ve been in corporate communications and recently left that. I’m trying to make a career about all the other things I love to do but didn’t have time for.”

Until recently, the idea of living in your parents' basement might have been viewed with some derision. Now, more families here have been stacking two, three — or even four generations — under one roof. We take a close look at the growth of multi-generational living in Kansas City.

Guests:

Courtesy Photo / Ziegler family

Most of the people older than 65 in the Kansas City area live either on their own or with family, meaning a spouse or child or a grandchild. 

But most older people living with grandchildren are the caregivers in the house.  

It was different for me. When my mother died, my husband and three young children moved into the family home to live with my aging father. We lived together for 17 years.

Marcy Oehmke / Linn High School

An estimated 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease.

That number is projected to nearly triple by 2050 as the U.S. population trends older. Currently, there is no cure for the disease and no treatments shown to slow its progress.

Clay County, in north central Kansas, has the nation's highest rate of people on Medicare diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. At 22 percent, it’s roughly double the rate in surrounding counties, as well as state and national averages.

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

Guests:

Dave Ranney / Heartland Health Monitor

A recent change in Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services policy will reduce access to services that help the state’s frail elders avoid often-costly nursing home stays, according to directors of the state’s Area Agencies on Aging.

“This will have an impact on case management services, which we believe are pivotal when it comes to helping our customers remain in their homes,” says Janis DeBoer, executive director of the Kansas Area Agencies on Aging Association. “Case management is the glue that keeps everything together.”

The Missouri Supreme Court is scheduled to announce some decisions Tuesday and one of them might involve the Kansas City Chiefs.

Steve Cox, a former maintenance manager at Arrowhead Stadium, is suing the Chiefs for age discrimination. The Missouri Supreme Court will decide on whether key evidence from the plaintiff’s side will be admissible.

“Any time that there’s a legal matter that you’re involved in you’re always concerned,” said Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt last week. “I don’t specifically have concern over that issue though.”

Esther Honig / KCUR

On a muggy afternoon in June, John Bruhn drives through Kansas City’s Ivanhoe neighborhood, reading the house numbers out loud until he sees No. 3735. With a clipboard in hand, he walks down the path to a small, yellow house and knocks at the front door.

Dating is hard, even for those just beginning that scene. But once you pass the age of 70, the challenges can be even greater. We talk with two seniors who stepped outside their comfort zones to try a new way  of meeting people and a film director who holds the issue close to heart. 

Guests: 

Johnson County Museum

Drive around some of Johnson County’s neighborhoods and you may be able to guess when the neighborhood was developed — based on the architecture alone.

Following World War II, ranch houses were being built at record levels. The single-story, open concept style was the perfect starter home for new families.

“It was the first house ever to be mass produced in the United States,” said Mary Van Balgooy.

publik15 / flickr.com

America’s prisons are dealing with an unprecedented issue: a rapidly increasing population of elderly inmates. It’s estimated that one-third of the entire prison population will be 55 years and older by the year 2030.

Oaktree b / Wikimedia Commons

The last of the Baby Boomers turn 50 this year. By 2030 one out of every five people in the U.S. will be 65-plus. These are people not content to sit in a rocker on the front porch. They want to live independently for as long as possible, experience and learn new things, and have communities that help them stay active and engaged.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

On Tuesday's Central Standard, we invited a variety of artists to discuss how their practice has evolved as they have moved from one stage of life to another.

As a ballet dancer embarked on retirement from the stage and into a teaching and choreographing role at the age of 32, he sat down with a visual artist who has more than forty years of studio experience and a legendary jazz saxophonist. The three compared notes across genres. 

Highlights:

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has approved the Kansas Plan on Aging for the next four years. The plan is a broad outline of how the state intends to use federal resources under the Older Americans Act.

Secretary for Aging and Disability Services, Shawn Sullivan, says the plan is based on priorities identified by older Kansans, and those who work with them.

“Seniors here in Kansas want to stay at home, and in order to do that, I think there are some changes that we need to make," says Sullivan.

After A City Life, Retiring To The Farm

Jul 10, 2013
Abbie Fentress Swanson / Harvest Public Media

It’s not just lifelong farmers who feel the pull of the land as they get older. For some Americans, retirement is an opportunity to begin the farming dream.

“I wanted to be able to be active and have a pastime that ensured physical activity,” said beginning farmer Tom Thomas, who at 65 still has the physical fitness to wrestle and brand steers at his son’s ranch in Oklahoma.

Thomas retired two years ago after teaching exercise physiology for 35 years and he knew what he wanted to do next.

Parenting Our Parents

Mar 5, 2013

For most of a child's life, from infancy and into adulthood, parents take care of, support and help their children make decisions. It's an odd experience though when the parents gets elderly and the child has to step in as caregiver. On this Central Standard, we look at how the family dynamic changes when parents can't take care of themselves and how to approach the situation from an emotional and logistical point of view.