Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

  • Monday: Financial Advisors: Death &Taxes
  • Tuesday: Outgoing City Council Members / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: The Nature Conservancy's Glenn Prickett
  • Thursday: The Politics of Pain / Weekend To Do List
  • Friday: Steve's Bookshelf

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  Violence against women always has a profound effect, even on the men who witness it. V-men is a workshop where men examine abuse against women through the lens of their own experiences.

Guest:

  • Rodney Smith is the associate director of Student Support Services at UMKC.

EVENT INFO: The V-Men workshop will take place Wednesday, Feb 18 at 5 p.m. at UMKC Women's Center, 105 Haag Hall (5120 Rockhill Road).

Flicker-CC

From FitBits to Smart watches and Google Glass, tech developers want to incorporate their products into our everyday uniforms. But as the makers of Google Glass found out in January, creating wearable technology that people actually want to use is harder than they they thought. 

Many Americans have an image of the president decisively taking action to avert crisis. Yet this is often not the case. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with a former Director of the White House Situation Room about what really happens in a crisis, and the team that supports presidential decisions.

Guest:

  Teaching kids about sex has always been controversial. There are a lot of ways to go about it: the chaste filmstrips of yore, abstinence advocacy or scientific specifics.

On Monday's Up to Date, we look into the debate over that curriculum with psychologist Wes Crenshaw. We discuss his idea for consent-based sex education. We also talk with high school student filmmakers about the approach they’re taking with their own documentary on sex education.

Guests:

Local Listen: Bon Ton Soul Accordion Band

Feb 13, 2015
Bon Ton Soul Accordion Band / Facebook

The Bon Ton Soul Accordion Band was one of Kansas City’s preeminent party ensembles in the 1980s. The bawdy dance band recently reunited after a lengthy hiatus.

This week’s edition of Local Listen features “Steal Away,” a track from the group’s 1984 album “Ain’t No Zydeco… But It’s Something Else.”

The group will perform a combination Valentine’s Day and Mardi Gras show at Kanza Hall, Saturday, Feb. 14 at 4 p.m.

Gunnar Magnusson / Flickr-CC

When you think of cheese, you might think Wisconsin's got the market covered, but a few local cheese producers say Kansas City has something special too.

Weston's Green Dirt Farm exclusively makes sheep's milk cheese and is one of only a few sheep dairies in the country to make its own cheese. Cheese made from different milks-- cow, goat and sheep--have different tastes. Sheep's milk cheese, for instance, can have a nutty flavor.

On Friday's Up to Date, we discussed these cheeses:

University of Missouri Kansas City

The University of Missouri-Kansas City will open a food pantry at the end of March in a step to combat food insecurity among its students.

College is often associated with ‘the freshman fifteen’, but with tuition costs climbing each year, many students are finding themselves unable to pay for food.

Angela Cottrell is the director of the Office of Student Involvement at UMKC, which will be operating the food pantry. She says that many students ask themselves a difficult question every day, "Would I rather have a meal or do I need that money to pay my tuition?"

Whether you want to celebrate Valentine's Day with dinner and a movie or distract yourself from the day of Cupid, Up to Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have a few ideas of what you can see on the silver screen.

Cynthia Haines:  

  • Two Days, One Night
  • Mr. Turner 
  • Oscar-nominated short films

Steve Walker:

Kansas Geological Survey

Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes than ever before due to a process for disposing waste water, which has increased due to oil fracking.

In Kansas, earthquake activity in the last few months has also seen a dramatic increase.

From the killing of a Jordanian pilot to the death of an American aid worker, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria continues to dominate world headlines. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with journalist George Packer about ISIS, America’s continuing involvement in Iraq, and his work covering regions of conflict. 

Guest:

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has signed an executive order rescinding protected class status for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender state workers.  We talk to two local journalists about public reactions to the governor's move and what it means for the LGBT community in Kansas.

Guests:

  • Peggy Lowe is a reporter for Harvest Public Media based at KCUR.
  • Barb Shelly is a columnist for the Kansas City Star.

Kansas City native Kelley Hunt has been recording and performing for years. Her latest album Beautiful Bones has received some of the biggest accolades of her career. The Lawrence-based blues singer joins Steve Kraske to talk about her long career and upcoming performance at the Folly Theater. Also joining the conversation is Hunt's manager, co-producer, and husband, Al Berman.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

On this edition of Up To Date, we learn the latest on the proposed cultural district in Kansas City, after a three-day public planning charrette where community members offered ideas on how the district could be designed and operated. Joining us for the conversation is Julián Zugazagoitia, CEO and Director of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

For good or bad, we have all told lies and been lied to. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with philosopher and author Clancy Martin about the impact of lies on love and how deceiving those we love can help preserve our most intimate relationships. 

Guest:

  • Clancy Martin is a professor of philosophy at UMKC and the author of Love and Lies: An Essay on Truthfulness, Deceit, and the Growth and Care of Erotic Love.

Kansas City is beginning to catch up with the nation when it comes to employment growth, according to the director of research at the Mid-America Regional Council.

“The new data says that over the last year we actually grew at the same rate as the rest of the U.S., instead of lagging as we had for the last several years,” Frank Lenk told Up To Date host Steve Kraske on Monday.

Don Ipock / Kansas City Repertory Theatre

"This is the story of two great fighters: Achilles and Hector," says the Poet, a storyteller played by Kyle Hatley in the Kansas City Repertory Theatre's production of An Iliad. "What drove them to fight? The gods." 

An Iliad, adapted for the stage by Lisa Peterson and Kansas City native Denis O'Hare, is based on "The Iliad," a nearly 3,ooo-year-old epic poem attributed to Homer. The story takes place in the final year of the 10-year war between the Greeks and the Trojans.

UMKC’s Bloch School of Management has been under fire since being stripped of its top-25 Princeton Review ranking for fabricating data to boost the school’s standing. Now, the school’s No. 1 ranking of its entrepreneurship program is also being questioned. UMKC Chancellor Leo Morton apologizes to students, faculty, and staff and speaks with Steve Kraske about the impact on the university and where it goes from here.

One woman is given the weekend to convince her co-workers to give up their bonuses or lose her job, and another becomes obsessed with the suicide of a member in her support group. On Friday's Up To Date, our independent, foreign, and documentary film critics discuss these films and other movies playing now, plus the Oscar nominated live action, documentary, and animated shorts.  Films opening today:

  • Two Days, One Night

Films already showing:

IFC Films

With the Academy Awards quickly approaching on Feb. 22, it may be just the weekend to head out to the theaters to see some of the nominees. Up To Date's Indie, Foreign, and Documentary film critics offer their Oscar nominated suggestions. 

Cynthia Haines:

  • Two Days, One Night
  • Oscar-Nominated Live Action Short Films
  • Boyhood 

Steve Walker:

  Vaccination is just one of many medical choices made for children. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske and guests talk about who gets to weigh in on those decisions: the parents, the doctors, the government?  And what input do children have regarding their own health care?

Guests:

Local Listen: Marcus Hampton

Feb 4, 2015
Artists Recording Collective

Trumpeter Marcus Hampton, a cousin of jazz legend Lionel Hampton, recently moved to the Kansas City area. The trumpeter and bandleader ably maintains his family’s rich legacy. This week’s edition of Local Listen features Hampton House of Jazz, the title track of his 2014 album.

Hear More: Marcus Hampton’s sextet will be joined by vocalist Toni Gates at the Blue Room on Friday, February 6.

Senate Bill 71 is currently before the Ways and Means Committee of the Kansas Senate.  If it becomes law, it could immediately force school districts to rework their current budgets. Steve Kraske and guests examine the bill.  

Guests:

Moderates in Kansas once were the dominant political force in the state. Now conservatives hold sway. Steve Kraske talks with two former politicians working to keep the moderate voice alive in the Sunflower State. 

Guests:

  Kansas City Star reporter Mike Hendricks explains to Steve Kraske his work unraveling "the puzzle that was difficult but fascinating" and resulted in the Henry W. Bloch School of Management being stripped of its ranking as having a top 25 entrepreneurship program by The Princeton Review.

 

Courtesy Photo / Dick Berkley

In his 12-year tenure as Kansas City mayor, Dick Berkley met hundreds of celebrities, sports stars, and political figures. Fortunately, he never went anywhere without his camera.

“I’m so lucky. I just can’t emphasize how fortunate I’ve been to have the ability travel and meet these people, and take a little opportunity when it was in front of me to take somebody’s picture,” Berkley told Steve Kraske on Up To Date.

For adults with special needs, living independently is a challenge. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with the director of a local organization dedicated to helping adults with developmental disabilities live on their own. Also joining the conversation is the author of a cookbook specially designed for their needs.

Guests:

Lane4 Property Group

The new owners of the Metcalf South Shopping center have submitted plans for its redevelopment.

Last week, they announced their new, multi-purpose vision for the center incorporating luxury apartments, restaurants, shops and office space.

Kansas City’s Lane4 Property Group and The Kroenke Group of Columbia purchased the center in February, 2014. The same year the Metcalf South Mall, which has long been mostly vacant, officially closed.

News about legislative committee meetings at a Jefferson City country club have raised new questions about Missouri's ethics laws. State Representative Jeremy LaFaver and Missouri State University political scientist George Connor join Steve Kraske to discuss cleaning up ethics in the state. 

Guests:

  • Rep. Jeremy La Faver is a Democrat from Kansas City.
  • George Connor is a political Scientist at Missouri State University.

Doctors don't know what caused a severe neurologic condition to manifest itself a few months ago in three patients, including a 13-year-old from Joplin, Mo. On this edition of Up To Date, we try to understand this mysterious condition, and learn how doctors investigate unknown diseases.

Guests:

  • Dr. Mary Anne Jackson is the Division Chief of Infectious Disease at Children’s Mercy Hospital.
  • Dan Margolies is the health editor at KCUR.
frankieleon / Flickr-CC

  Football is a game of inches—and, apparently, pounds-per-square-inch. By now, you’d have to be living way off the gridiron to not know about “Deflategate”—or “Ballghazi,” depending on the major media outlet covering the story, which is all of them.

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