Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: The Rules of "Oppo" Research / Streetcar Executive Director Tom Gerend
  • Tuesday: Park University's Standout Pianist / How Secure is Your Vote?
  • Wednesday: Health of the Highways / Local Listen
  • Thursday: Veterinarian Wayne Hunthausen / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: Indie, Foreign and Documentary Film Critics
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From attempts to overturn Obamacare to rumors of sweeping tax reform, there's plenty going on in the federal Capitol these days — not to mention the White House. Today, Democrat Emanuel Cleaver, of Missouri, and Kansas' Republican Kevin Yoder, both U.S. representatives, discuss the issues congress is grappling with now and will likely deal with in the near future. They also share their thoughts on President Donald Trump's first 88 days in office.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Pianist Steven Spooner wanted to do something big to commemorate the careers of his favorite musicians. Spooner explains why he spent 19 months creating "Dedications," 16 albums-worth of music devoted to some of the great piano masters.

Then, on Earth Day people in more than 100 cities are taking to the streets to March For Science. The rally is a response to what organizers say is a political climate that threatens science's role in the country.

Dave Dugdale / Flickr - CC

Several factors influence a person's financial health: age, career choice, dependents ... but gender? According to a 2016 report by Financial Finesse, a firm that manages financial wellness programs for employers, women are not as financially secure in the long-term when compared to their male counterparts, especially among millennials. Today, the Smart Money Experts discuss methods of closing that gap and suggest budget workouts to help achieve fiscal fitness.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Today, we learn about two bills making their way through the Missouri General Assembly; one would place stricter rules on ride-hailing businesses like Lyft and Uber, another would create a statewide prescription drug monitoring database.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Kansas City Royals are off to a rough start. But what can fans do about it? What should they do? Simply wait it out? Well … yeah. Sorta. Commentator Victor Wishna explains, in this April edition of “A Fan’s Notes.”

Kyle Espeleta / The Orchard

After your Easter plans for this weekend are done, gather the extended family together for some movie-binging. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have recommendations for the whole clan — even that one weird cousin. (You know who we're talking about!) Pro tip: Use the spoils from the Easter egg hunt to save yourself some cash on candy at the theater.

Steve Walker

Tommy's Honour, PG

Drenaline / Wikimedia Commons

It's a long haul from Kansas City, Kansas, to Kanorado, but driving west on Interstate 70 doesn't have to be boring. Today, we learn about some of the quirky sights and stops to enjoy while traveling the highway's 424 miles in Kansas.

Then, coming out as gay is hard enough, but it can be even more difficult for older men in rural settings. We hear the story of an Iowa psychiatrist who came out after 18 years of heterosexual marriage.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Moving back to Kansas City from New York City in the mid to late 1980s was an eye-opening experience for David Hughes.

"I started meeting artists, curators, dancers and musicians. I saw a lot of amazing individuals doing interesting work," says Hughes, who realized that "artists need support." 

American Century Investments, his employer at the time, contributed $10,000. And, in 1997, four cash awards were distributed to artists as the newly created Charlotte Street Foundation

Andrew Goloida / Flickr - CC

Some symptoms of allergies are easily recognizable: itchy eyes, runny nose, congestion and coughing. But excessive ear infections and sore throats — even snoring — can be a harbinger of sensitivity in some kids to the environment. Even doctors can be challenged to suss out whether little ones have a run-of-the-mill cold or something more. Today, pediatricians offer guidance for dealing with kids suffering from allergies.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Since its establishment in 1997, the Charlotte Street Foundation has distributed over $1.1 million to provide resources for Kansas City artists, including unrestricted grants and free exhibition and studio space. Today we examine what impact the foundation has had in strengthening and maintaining existing local talent, and in attracting it from around the country.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Saying Kauffman Stadium has been keeping busy would be an understatement.

From renovation projects, to exhibits honoring the late Yordano Ventura and even liquid nitrogen ice cream, we speak with staff from all corners of The K who have made the Royals' 2017 home opener an experience to remember.

But don't worry, we didn't forget about the game! We also analyze the team's strengths and weaknesses as we look at how our boys in blue may perform this season.

Joyce N. Boghosian / National Museum of American History Smithsonian Institution / Flickr - CC

Scott Simon, journalist and longtime host of Weekend Edition Saturday, is known for his calm, civilized demeanor, but that attitude quickly changes when it comes to the Chicago Cubs. We speak with NPR's Saturday morning voice about his ties to the baseball team and how their thrilling 2016 World Series win drove him to write a book about his beloved Cubbies.

Toronto International Film Festival

With the Kansas City FilmFest going on this weekend, there's no shortage of great cinema to take in (not to mention the New York Dog Film Festival and Pooch Party). For those of us not lucky enough to get tickets to that event, though, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few recommendations that can fill the festival void.

Kashif Pathan / Flickr - CC

If President Donald Trump's budget blueprint were to become law, the agency that administers federal museum and library programs would cease to exist.

In the 2016 fiscal year, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) had a budget of $230 million. Nearly 80 percent of that money went to fund library services throughout the country, according to their website.

Jim Mathis / Johnson County Library

Kansas City, Missouri, voters approved a series of general obligation bonds aimed at improving infrastructure throughout the metro, and totaling more than $800 million. Today, Councilman Quinton Lucas tells us how he expects the investments to affect local communities. Then, public libraries may be facing cuts at both federal and state levels. We speak with local library directors to find out how they are faring in an era of "skinny budgets."

Charvex / Wikimedia Commons

As the centennial of the United States' entry into the First World War approaches, eyes across the globe are on Kansas City, Missouri. 

Today, we learn how the National World War I Museum and Memorial is commemorating the occasion, and who you can expect to see at the event.

The U.S. National Archives

When President Harry Truman moved into the White House, he thought the creaks and groans meant it was haunted. It turns out it was just in imminent danger of collapse. Today, hear the story of how the executive mansion was completely gutted and restored. Then, what takes more than seven years and 900 international volunteers to complete?

nrkbeta / Flickr - CC

Matthew Dowd's career is an unusual one. He was a strategist for Republican President George W. Bush's re-election campaign, and, before that, a staffer for Missouri's Democratic Congressman Dick Gephardt. Now, he is taking an Independent tack to get past partisan gridlock. Today, we speak with the ABC News analyst about his life, his career, and the political situations in Austin, Springfield and Washington.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For all the times that scientific research has improved our lives, there are other times when science got it horribly wrong. Today, Dr. Paul Offit describes the lessons we have learned, and should be learning, to separate good science from bad.

Mongrel Media

While certain Missouri and K-State backers may have felt a little schadenfreude last weekend, fans of KU basketball had a tougher time, as the team lost to Oregon in an Elite Eight game in Kansas City's Sprint Center. Thanks to Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics, downtrodden Jayhawks fans have something other than the ongoing NCAA basketball tournament to watch this weekend, though their recommendations may not elicit any less emotion.

Steve Walker

Better Block Foundation

The push for safe spaces and trigger warnings is leading many educators to more carefully curate their syllabi. The issue inspired creativity in a Kansas City playwright and the two local actors performing in his new project.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For Mayor Sly James, this has been a particularly busy time. On Tuesday evening, he gave his State of the City Address, which we discuss today, along with a bond proposal James says will trim, but not eliminate, a backlog of public works projects in Kansas City, Missouri.

Sarah Craig/Faces of Fracking / Flickr - CC

While scientists have gained a clearer understanding of what's causing recent earthquakes in the Great Plains, they haven't reached a point where people can let their guard down. That's according to Heather DeShon, associate professor and seismologist at Southern Methodist University.

"The earthquakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas ... have been linked to a process called wastewater injection," she says.

In that process, large volumes of salty, briny water are deposited into cavities in deep rock layers, says DeShon.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr Creative Commons

Earthquakes in the Central U.S. have been steadily increasing due to oil production, gas extraction and disposal of wastewater. Seismologist Heather DeShon tells us if it is possible to mitigate the number of occurrences. Then, finding political common ground between parties. Mark Gerzon, president of the Mediators Foundation, explores cross-party cooperation in his most recent book, The Reunited States of America.

Kansas City Fashion Week

Kansas City takes the nickname 'Paris of the Plains' seriously, and not just because of our fountains. Today, we learn why Kansas City Fashion Week has designers, photographers, models, makeup artists, and stylists gathered in the Heartland. Then, the director of the Vatican Observatory looks at the intersection of religion and science. He'll also answer an "age-old" question for us: Should extraterrestrials be baptized?

Film Sience, and XYZ Films

This weekend's recommendations will have you tapping into a multitude of emotions. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics are presenting educational and historical documentaries, melancholic dramas, and some very quirky — and at times very dark — comedies. 

Steve Walker

The Last Word, R

Platige Films

It's an exciting year for the Kansas City FilmFest. Today, we preview the high-profile guests coming to town, the inclusion of the Dog Film Festival, and the top Midwest films of the year, like Big Sonia.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When Mamie Hughes first came to Kansas City, back in the early 1950s, things were a bit different than they are now.

"I used to wish I had a dollar for every time I was called n-----," says the 87-year-old.

Maj. Geoff Legler / Oklahoma National Guard

Donald Trump took over the Oval Office two months ago, and his trade policies are having an effect. Today, we'll find out how his search for better deals is creating divisions in Dawson County, Nebraska. Then, learn how building techniques, borrowed from construction practices in hurricane zones, can help Tornado Alley homes stand up to spring's strong winds.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As a former county lawmaker, teacher, community planner, advocate and volunteer, Mamie Hughes has had a lasting impact on Kansas City. Today, we look at life of one of the metro's most dedicated activists.

Then, we meet the enthusiastic conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, and ask what it's been like leading "America's Orchestra" for more than 20 years.

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