Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

  • Monday: Up to Date is off. Enjoy Reveal documentary on citizens using cameras to record police behavior
  • Tuesday: Crisis in Congress / Pianos on Parade / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: Annie Presley: Read This When I'm Dead /America's Infrastructure/ Local Listen
  • Thursday: Religion Survey of America / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: Sports Technology

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Local Listen: Danielle Nicole

Mar 27, 2015
www.daniellenicolekc.com

  

Danielle Nicole Schnebelen went right to work following the recent breakup of the popular Kansas City blues-rock band Trampled Under Foot.  Schnebelen’s new solo EP showcases her powerful voice.  This week’s edition of Local Listen features “Wandering Heart,” a track from the self-titled release. 

Danielle Nicole Schnebelen headlines a homecoming concert at Knuckleheads on Saturday, March 28.

Kansas City’s Steve Metzler was a business leader, a nonprofit supporter, and a patron of the arts, but phrases don’t begin to describe the impact he had on the community.

On this edition of Up To Date guest host Brian Ellison shares memories with those whose lives were touched by Metzler and talks with Steve's long-time partner, Brian Williams. 

Technology is finding it's way into every part of our lives, and it may be in our roads sooner than we think. One Kansas City engineer is proposing a smart I-70 that could charge electric cars by contact, connect to navigation systems, and more. 

Guests:

If you've got spring fever and want to get out of the house this weekend, Up to Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have a few suggestions of what you can see.

Cynthia Haines:

  • What We Do In The Shadows
  • Wild Tales
  • Diplomacy

Steve Walker:

Courtesy Photo / Paula Rose

Gender representation at Wikipedia is well-documented. Studies conducted by the Wikimedia Foundation (which serves as Wikipedia’s support structure) conclude that less than 15 percent of the popular online encyclopedia’s contributors are female.

According to Siko Bouterse, director of community resources at the Wikimedia Foundation, diversity among editors is vitally important to Wikipedia’s vision.

“Our vision for Wikipedia is ‘the sum of all human knowledge,’” she says. “We need everyone to contribute to that. The encyclopedia is incomplete without that.”

The lack of female editors has significant repercussions on the encyclopedia’s content. Pages on women’s health, women’s issues, and famous women artists tend to be mere paragraphs long, or as Wikipedians say, “stubs,” if they even exist at all.

Financial transitioning is a challenge whether you're entering the workforce for the first time or planning your retirement. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Certified Financial Planners about planning, budgeting, saving and spending at the beginning and end of your working life. 

Guests:

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. Research by the Wikimedia Foundation determined that less than 15% of its contributors identify as female, which creates a great disparity in the popular online encyclopedia's content. We discuss what organizations in Kansas City and around the world are doing to fix this problem.

Guests:

Sexual assault on college campuses is getting new attention these days as societal attitudes change regarding this issue. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with two local Title IX officials about how they educate students and faculty, and investigate sexual assault allegations.

Guests:

Kansas and Missouri, among other states, are pushing a bill calling for a national constitutional convention —the first since the original convention in 1787. Steve Kraske discusses the issues surrounding this call to action, and why supporters feel they can succeed when 750 other attempts have failed.

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas.
  • Rep. John Rubin (R) represents Shawnee, Kansas, and supports the bill calling for a constitutional convention.

Kansas City producer Jim McCullough is fulfilling a dream to create a Sci-fi show filmed in his hometown. Paradox City takes place in a world where superheroes can't use their powers and everyone lives in a giant fortress that hovers above ground. On this edition of Up To Date, McCullough explains his team's method of crowd funding the pilot episode by breaking it into short webisodes to be released as each dollar goal is achieved. 

In order to become a naturalized citizen, immigrants must pass a basic U.S. civics test. Some Missouri lawmakers are pushing for the state to adopt education policies that would require high schoolers to pass the same test to graduate. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske talks with two lawmakers supporting this requirement, and quizzes listeners with questions from the U.S. Citizenship Civics Test.

Guests:

Spring has sprung, and if you feel like springing for movie tickets this weekend, our indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas for you.

Cynthia Haines:

  • What We Do In The Shadows
  • Diplomacy
  • Red Army

Steve Walker:

  • Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalam
  • '71
  • Diplomacy
Beth Lipoff / KCUR

Long-haired peace-loving hippies promoting ideas of free love are the foundation of the ground-breaking 1967 musical "Hair".

On Friday's Up to Date, we talk with two of the Broadway cast members about their experiences on stage, what the show means to them and why they're taking part in a new retrospective production at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre.

When it comes to internet crime, criminals are far ahead of law enforcement and the general public. As more and more hacks make headlines, we talk about our vulnerability as individuals and how to protect ourselves from a cyber attack.

David Stonner / Missouri Department of Conservation

The Missouri Department of Conservation has long been the envy of the nation, as far as conservation departments go.

Since the mid-1970s, it has been solely funded by a ⅛ cent conservation sales tax. Because it does not receive any general revenue from the government, it naturally operates without much oversight.

Until now, the model hasn’t presented much of a problem. In fact, Missouri's has been touted as one of the best conservation departments in the country.

But one Missouri representative thinks the current model is flawed. Rep. Craig Redmon, the Republican Chair of the Conservation Appropriation Committee, thinks the current funding mechanism is vulnerable.

Redmon wrote a bill calling for the repeal of the ⅛ cent conservation sales tax — a bill he doesn't actually support.

Human's scientific knowledge reaches far and wide, particularly when it comes to the Earth's surface, but we are just beginning the exploration of Earth's deepest reaches, the oceans.  On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with oceanographer, Dr. David Gallo, about new discoveries and how the vastness of the oceans makes it difficult to discover the largest things we lose, like airplanes. 

In May 1915, a German U-boat sunk one of the world's greatest ocean liners, the Lusitania. Erik Larson's new book, Dead Wake: the Last Crossing of the Lusitania, maps the tale known to many as the event that launched America into the Great War. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Erik Larson about his research process, the captains behind the ships involved, and the mystery of Room 40.

Guest:

The oldest culture on the planet, Aboriginals have inhabited the Australian continent for more than 50,000 years. National Geographic photographer  Amy Toensing spent three years documenting their lives and captured how their ancient tradition lives on in the modern world. 

Hear More: Amy Toensing speaks Tuesday, March 17 at 7:30 at the Muriel Kauffman Theatre. For information and tickets, click here.

The "selfie culture" is changing how young people see themselves, express themselves, and communicate. But sometimes, that expression can lead to trouble. We explore the darker side of the "selfie culture" and what parents need to know about it. 

Guests: 

  • Wes Crenshaw is a psychologist board certified in couples and family psychology.
  • Kyra Haas is a senior at Lawrence Free State High School and co-author of the Double Take advice column in the Lawrence Journal-World.

Local Listen: Drakkar Sauna

Mar 13, 2015

The Lawrence based duo, Drakkar Sauna, has been crafting eccentric music with an old-time sound for over a decade.  This edition of Local Listen features a meditation on interplanetary colonization.  Take a listen to The Long Sovereignty.

 

Hear More: Drakkar Sauna makes a rare appearance in Kansas City on Saturday, March 14, at the MiniBar.

 

Colm O'Regan

 

Irish comedian Colm O'Regan might have something to say about your mama. Rather, his Irish mammy might.

The comedian, who is in Kansas City for a stand up show Friday, achieved accidental Twitter fame while preparing for a comedy web-sketch.

"I wanted to make it look like an Irish mother, maybe 60 years or so, had a Twitter account — this was back in 2011 when Twitter wasn't as ever present as it is now," he says.

He started Tweeting ordinary things an Irish mother might say. For example:

Frankfort Convention Center / Flickr-CC

If you find yourself stuck in downtown traffic this weekend, then you’ll know that college basketball has once again taken over our town. In this March edition of 'A Fan’s Notes,' commentator Victor Wishna gets to the heart of the madness, with a look at the one tournament that started it all.

Violence in the urban core is all too familiar for Missouri. A recently released study from 2012 puts Missouri at the top of the list for inner city homicide. Steve Kraske asks why, and looks at what's being done locally to curb violent crime. 

Guests: 

It's starting to feel like spring, and if you want to celebrate the warmer weather, Up to Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have some ideas for you.

Cynthia Haines:

  • Diplomacy
  • Mr. Turner
  • Red Army

Steve Walker:

Michael Gil / Flickr-CC

How many times have you seen a car pulled over at the side of the road and wondered why they were being pulled over?

Three professors at the University of Kansas did more than wonder. Charles Epp, Steven Maynard-Moody, and Donald Haider-Markel started surveying drivers in the Kansas City metro area in 2004 and studied the research over the next 10 years. 

What they found is that race is deeply embedded in police practice.

James Madison is an oft-forgotten American President, but his ability to build relationships laid the foundation for the America we know today. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with historian David Stewart about the life and contributions of America's fourth president. 

Guest:

  A certain breed of specialist is called in when someone is trapped, missing, or feared dead. These specialists are search and rescue dogs. On this edition of Up To Date,  a look that the lives of these canines and their powerful noses.

Guests:

  • Cat Warren is the author of What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World.
  • Mark Kramer is the deputy director of Kansas Search and Rescue, Northern Region. 

When it comes to strategies of how to deal with a shooter in the building, the only options teachers used to have were locking the doors or evacuating. These days schools have another choice when dealing with an active shooter...fighting back. A new active shooter simulation program from the Missouri Center for Education Safety gives teachers a hands-on experience in thwarting a potential attacker. 

Guests 

Antonin Dvorak's Symphony No. 8 is joyful and romantic — fitting for the season, as we bid adieu to the bitter winter weather.

“It was written when Dvorak was at a resort, and this symphony sounds like that,” Kansas City Symphony executive director Frank Byrne told Steve Kraske on Up To Date.

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