Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and entertainment - topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: Disaster Recoveries: Joplin Tornado and Hurricane Sandy
  • Tuesday: The Nazi Titanic
  • Wednesday: Smart Money Experts: Brexit & You / SCOTUS Dissents / Local Listen
  • Thursday: TBD / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: The Story of John R. Brinkley / KCPS Superintendent Mark Bedell

Claiming patients who experience psychosis have a chemical imbalance is an easy and incomplete explanation to a complicated problem. Treating patients with medication doesn't work for everyone, but other options do exist. Some are finding hope and better quality of life with a more holistic approach.

Guests:

Novelist Richard Russo isn’t known for sequels. So he’s broken new ground with his latest, Everybody’s Fool, in which he returns to North Bath, the fictional upstate New York setting of his 1993 novel, Nobody’s Fool. We talk with the author about his writing process and why he like to write about "ordinary" people.

There's always that one friend whose obsession leaks into every conversation. Wendy Perron, dancer, choreographer, and writer, says, "I'd be talking about dance so much that friends would say, 'Just shut up already.'" Despite the advice, Perron has built a career around documenting changes in dance and choreography since the 1970s.

http://ballcharts.com/

Flipping through the channels this time of year, you might catch one of the 27 rounds of the NBA playoffs. But around here, basketball season pretty much ends with March Madness.

Or, maybe not.

This weekend, this city of the Royals and Chiefs, and once Monarchs and Kings, welcomes some new sports nobility to town: The Kansas City Majestics are the first professional women’s basketball team in 20 years to call KCMO home.

http://www.musicboxfilms.com/

From fairy tale beasts in a mythical land to Napoleon's ghost wandering the halls of the Louvre during World War II, this week's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics provide a great weekend escape. Dive in to one of these flicks while they're still on area screens.

Cynthia Haines

Francofonia, not rated

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of the films included in the program:

  • The Man Who Knew Infinity
  • High Rise
  • Rio, I Love You
  • Men & Chicken
  • Tale of Tales
  • Sing Street
  • Francofonia
  • First Monday in May
  • Papa: Hemingway in Cuba
  • Miles Ahead
  • Hologram for the King

In Kansas City these days, the phrase “tax-increment financing” generates lively conversation. But a different type of economic development tool, called the “community improvement district,” is in broad use around the metro, even though a lot of people may not know anything about it.

Guest:

  • Kevin Collison writes about development for KCUR.

The TV series Star Trek went where no one had gone before, both in its day and in the reality it created. Now, we Earthlings are using instruments and processes originally imagined by the creator and writers of the series, while our struggles with the issues of race and ideology it addressed in the 1960s continue.

Guest:

ceedub13 / Wikimedia Commons

As the post-World War II Baby Boom generation inexorably relaxes its grip on the workplace, many who once rocked the night away still want to hold onto all of the youthful diversions they can. Translation: It’s hard to let go of the fun stuff.

Even if it doesn’t make wrinkles disappear, a virtual industry exists to appease the entertainment desires of those whose cherished memories of yesteryear might still be able to put a spring in their step. Translation: Fountain of Youth for sale.

http://americanjazzmuseum.org/

After decades on the scene, Ida McBeth's dusky voice and emotional delivery have reached legendary status in Kansas City. It's not just her soulful combination of blues, jazz and gospel styles that delights audiences, either; she's made a habit of surrounding herself with a band that knows how to really dig into a groove. Go on, we dare you to find someone who has seen McBeth perform and doesn't love her music.

Baby Boomers are aging and as they retire, challenges like financial concerns and health issues loom ahead. And as one generation begins to slow down, how can their younger counterparts harness their collective knowledge and expertise?

Guest:

She survived a person's worst nightmare. KCUR's investigative team brings us the story of how one woman’s vicious attacker was finally found after 17 years, and of the mistake that left the case open for so long.

Guests:

  

Attitudes about hospice and palliative care have changed dramatically over the last 40 years, and the number of patients who receive this type of treatment has expanded. Two longtime leaders in the field, though, acknowledge that more work is needed to ease the pain and suffering of the most ailing patients.

Guests:

With 155 million Americans playing regularly, the video game industry has hit the big time. While modern gaming serves up plenty of mental puzzles, prizes, and even opportunities for social interaction, the danger is keeping a harmless hobby from becoming an addiction.

Guests:

There's a lot to talk about in politics right now. The Kansas Legislative session is over, Missouri's session is in its final week, and the race for the presidential nomination is headed for the finish line. Up To Date's political pundits hash it all out. 

Guests:

For the first time since 1957, streetcars are once again running in Kansas City, Mo.  Hear from KCUR reporters Laura Zeigler and Cody Newill, riders waiting to take a ride, and one federal official's thoughts on how Kansas City's streetcar plan could serve as a model for other metros. 

https://iknowdwill.files.wordpress.com

Blk Flanl is what happens when rapper Barrel Maker — that's Morgan Cooper — meets producer Conductor Williams, née Denzel Williams. The two may be familiar, not just to fans of local rap, because they've immersed themselves in the community. Cooper makes his living as a cinematographer, and Williams helped coach track at North Kansas City High School. In Blk Flanl, they tackle contemporary social issues with smart lyrics and bold beats, all served with a healthy dose of soul samples, and jazz- and R&B-inspired horns.

As Sue Sylvester on Glee, actress Jane Lynch delivered some of the best zingers ever written for television. Lynch has built a portfolio portraying what one media outlet called, "full-throttle, sexed-up, hyper-confident female wack jobs.” We catch up with Lynch as her musical tour gears up to come to Overland Park, Kansas. 

It was a conversation with his father when he was only seven years old that laid out the direction of author Andrew Solomon's life. Now, Solomon has chronicled his travels in a new book of essays, Far & Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change: Seven Continents, 25 Years.

https://chicagology.com

You've probably never heard of him, but if it weren’t for the work of Octave Chanute, those shiny streetcars might be climbing the hills of Saint Joseph, Missouri, not Kansas City. Instead of celebrating the Royals’ World Series win, we could be cheering on the Leavenworth Lions.

But in a single master stroke, Chanute’s Hannibal Bridge, completed in 1869, allowed cattle, and all sorts of other freight, to cross back and forth from Clay and Jackson counties in record time.

We live in a world filled with options. We’re constantly being asked to “like” or “dislike,” but what are we missing out on when everything is being catered to our preferences?

Guests:

Some middle-skill jobs in America, which can provide good pay, remain unfilled because job seekers don't have the necessary training. Meanwhile, many people struggle to find promising job opportunities. Today's guests think programs offering technical and vocational education can help bridge that gap.

Guests:

There is more to the relationship between the U.S. and Israel than just political gesturing. American diplomat and author Dennis Ross explains how international obligation, political tradition, and emotional attachment all enter into the equation when taking on long-standing problems in the Middle East.

Friday was the fifth annual International Jazz Day, celebrated at the the White House with a star-studded event hosted by the Obamas. We talk with saxophonist and UMKC Jazz Director Bobby Watson about playing at the event and catching up with some musical friends.

Kansas' budget woes have resulted in public schools across the state reducing costs and arts education is taking the hit. One Shawnee Mission teacher has had enough of shrinking support for the arts in his district.

Guests:

  • Jonathan Lane is Orchestra Director at Shawnee Mission East High School.
  • Narric Rome is vice-president of Government Affairs and Arts Education for Americans for the Arts.

Ernest Hemingway honed his writing style as a cub reporter in Kansas City, however, his later years were spent in Cuba. We look at a new movie about that period in Hemingway's life and whether a new generation of readers is finding its way to his works.

Guests:

  • Bob Yari, director of Papa Hemingway in Cuba, the first U.S. film shot entirely in Cuba since 1959.
  • Mariel Hemingway, granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway.
  • Steve Paul is a Hemingway scholar

U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts won re-election for his U.S. Senate seat in Kansas in 2014, but Greg Orman gave him a run for his money. Though Roberts ultimately won by 10 points, polls had Orman leading the Senate race in the final weeks — as an independent.

On KCUR’s Up To Date this week, Orman told host Steve Kraske his campaign proved independents can win in a place like Kansas. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As far as university presidents go, Venida Chenault is anything but ordinary. When she says she understands the circumstances some underserved college students are faced with, she really means it.

As one of five siblings raised in Topeka by a single mother, her family sometimes relied on government assistance to make ends meet. Chenault is now the seventh president of Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, but she used to pay the bills by cleaning hotel rooms and working as a secretary.

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

The weekend weather report's in... RAIN. So, go ahead and duck into your favorite cinema to indulge in a film fest of your very own. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics share their week's recommendations.

Cynthia Haines

The First Monday in May, PG-13

Steve Kraske / KCUR 89.3

On Monday, July 28, 2003, Joe Amrine was released from prison, after serving 17 years on death row for a murder he did not commit.

Four days later, shell-shocked from his first few days of freedom and swarms of media attention, Amrine appeared on KCUR’s Up To Date with Steve Kraske, wearing sunglasses.

“I didn’t want people to see the fear in my eyes,” Amrine says.

Amrine returned to Up To Date this week to give a glimpse of what life looks like for him after 13 years of freedom.

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