Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: Live from Park University for the Great American Eclipse!
  • Tuesday: Remaking the American Family / Kansas Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer
  • Wednesday: Univ. of Missouri System President Mun Y. Choi / Local Listen
  • Thursday: Garrison Keillor / The Lasting Influence of the KC Mafia / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: TBD
Sgt. Alicia Brand / U.S. Army

Few chemical reactions are as complicated to humans the one that elicits the feeling of love. Today, we learn about a psychobiological approach to couples therapy. Then, we discuss how racial tensions have changed in America during the Trump administration, and find out how last weekend's tragedy in Charlottesville, Virginia, has affected leaders of Kansas City's diverse communities.

Music Box Films

If preparations for Monday's total solar eclipse kept you from planning for the perfect weekend, don't fret! Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have you covered. While the movies they recommend might not be as dramatic as watching the moon blot out the sun for minutes at a time, they're still worth watching.

Steve Walker

Takeshi Kuboki / Flickr - CC

Birds, bees, fish, and all sorts of other animals exponentially expand their intelligence and abilities when they cluster together in swarms. Can humans do the same? Today, we find out how researchers are harnessing the benefits of the hive mind to create smarter, safer artificial intelligence.

Pixabay - CC

Adam Foss, a former assistant district attorney in Suffolk County, Mass., says today's justice system is the same as the one created hundreds of years ago, and it's failing a lot of people. Today, a conversation on how prosecutors can help fix the criminal justice system. Then, we get caught up on the state of organized labor in Missouri and the status of the

Sekgei / Flickr - CC

Does work have you feeling stressed out, or maybe it's politics or something in your personal life? Today, we explore two approaches to understanding and moving past those frustrations. First, we learn a little about how mindfulness meditation can help quiet your mind and bring about a new consciousness. Then, we find out how "traditional" family roles for mothers and fathers might be introducing tension into romantic relationships and parenthood.

Pixabay - CC

Tensions over the Jackson County jail continue to mount. Attorneys for former inmates filed a class-action lawsuit last week that would force authorities to address the detention center's dangerous, dirty conditions. Today, we speak with two Jackson County legislators about what they'd do to improve the facility. Then, we kick off a week full of conversation with presenters from this year's TEDxKC.

S Group Design

 

The term “fan” first entered the sports lexicon as shorthand for “fanatic” — and it wasn’t meant as a compliment. But as commentator Victor Wishna explains in “A Fan’s Notes,” when done responsibly, there’s no shame in getting carried away. It’s all part of the game.

So, how’s everybody’s summer?

Pixabay - CC

From a targeted shooting in Olathe to the president's so-called "travel ban," tensions over race, culture and religion are high. Today, we delve into two experiences in the Muslim community and learn what living in Trump's America has been like for Islamic people.

Paramount Pictures

If the "fire and fury" of this week's political tension has you seeking relief, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have suggestions for the perfect movie to keep your mind off earthly crises. Well, except for the first item on the list which, coincidentally, is about Earth's environmental problems (it's still worth watching though!)

Steve Walker

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, PG

Pixabay - CC

As summer wanes, students and teachers across all metro districts are getting ready for a new school year, but the challenges faced by teachers in urban settings can differ greatly from their suburban colleagues. Today, we speak with educators from both sides of the state line to learn about the rigors and rewards of teaching in the inner-city.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Everyone shares the same biology, but that doesn't mean we all enjoy the same access to unprejudiced medical training, health care or advice. Today, we speak with Dr. Damon Tweedy about being a Black Man in a White Coat in a country where being African-American can be bad for your health. Then, we get a quick recap of results from Tuesday's election in Kansas City, Missouri.

frankieleon / Flickr - CC

While communities across the country deal with dramatic increases in illegal opioid use, statistics in Johnson County suggest rates of death and addiction closer to home are relatively more stable.

Court filings involving opioid offenses have remained relatively flat in recent years, and illegal use has decreased for hydrocodone and oxycodone, two of the most popular opiates, according to a report from public health and crime experts presented to the Johnson County Commission in June. Heroin use remains steady.

Despite those encouraging numbers, local officials are wary.

Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this year, Karen Fuller, a former news anchor at KCTV-5, sued the station's owner, alleging the company created an age-ceiling for female anchors. Today, our Media Critics ask: Why is it common to have older newsmen on television but rare to see women anchors of a similar age?

Chris Dahlquist

What do you expect to find at a vending machine? Soda or chips? How about a full-blown history tour?

That’s the idea behind photographer Chris Dahlquist’s exhibit History Vendor, located at City Market Park on 3rd and Main Street through mid-October.

frankieleon / Flickr - CC

Just because court filings suggest illegal opioid use is down in Kansas' wealthiest county doesn't mean its residents are unaffected by rising usage nationwide. Today, we'll find out what opiate use looks like in Johnson County. Then, we learn what exactly makes sports fandom such a big deal in Kansas City, whether it's for the Chiefs, the Royals or Sporting KC.

Universal Pictures / Warner Bros. / MGM/UA Entertainment Co.

From E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial to Poltergeist, the summer of '82 was a seminal one for smash-hits that stood the test of time. Today, Up To Date's Video Gurus reunite to reminisce on the raft of red-hot motion pictures from the Reagan era, which helped establish a cinema season most Americans now take for granted.

Roadside Attractions

Some people believe they were born in the wrong era. If you just can't seem to find your place in the age of Big Data, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a set of recommendations to take you back to your spiritual time span. Whether you're pining for the Victorian 1850s or the bullish 1990s, take a break this weekend from push notifications and iPads, and enjoy the simplicity of bygone days.

Steve Walker

Landline, R

Harris & Ewing / U.S. Library of Congress

People generally get their history lessons from a book or movie, not from a vending machine. Today, we learn about a novel way to put historical photos of Kansas City into the hands of City Market Park visitors.

Sgt. 1st Class John Fries / 81st Regional Support Command

From homelessness to suicide, we hear a lot about the serious issues facing American veterans. Today, we explore how business-ownership can play a part in reintegrating some former service members to a happy, healthy civilian life. Then, Kansas City, Missouri, officials Sherri McIntyre and Joe Blankenship help parse what's behind recent delays in projects to paint bike lanes in the downtown loop.

Charvex / Wikipedia Commons

Next week's primary elections will be the first under a new set of voter ID rules in the state of Missouri. While Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft says the regulations will help thwart fraud, some civil rights groups worry about voter suppression and have sued the state in response.

Marleah Campbell / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City, Kansas has some questions to consider. How will the city address its food desert? What needs to be done to improve the public school system? Should the city continue to subsidize a minor league baseball team that can't pay its bills? On Tuesday, August 1, the city aims to answer these questions, and others, with one more: Who will be the next mayor? In advance of the election, KCUR's Up to Date and Donnelly College hosted a mayoral debate on July 26.

John Platt / IFC Midnight

Your local theater has a slew of cinema to choose from right now — from a romantic camping trip gone horribly wrong to a gritty documentary focused on the rising costs of prescription drugs.

A24

Did you know July is National Anti-Boredom Month? (No, we're not kidding.) If you're looking back in remorse at an uneventful last four weeks, it's time to get off the couch and get into your local theater! Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics are back to recommend the least-boring flicks playing now. Finish off the month in style with a movie that's sure to keep you entertained.

Cynthia Haines

Score: A Film Music Documentary, Not rated

File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

After months of speculation, news broke Wednesday evening that Pres. Donald Trump nominated Kansas' governor as ambassador-at-large for international religious freedom. The appointment requires Senate approval. Today, we hear from journalists, political thinkers, and Kansas state lawmakers to find out what this long-rumored move means for the Sunflower State, and to discuss the legacy Gov. Sam Brownback will leave behind.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

It's not easy to navigate the Kansas City area without a car, which makes the health of our highways very important. Today, the chiefs of the Missouri and Kansas departments of Transportation discuss future of I-70 and other roads on both sides of the state line. Then, the search for the next chief of police in Kansas City, Missouri, is down to two candidates. With this pivotal decision looming, we ask: What are residents looking for in their next top cop?

Jeremy Enlow / Van Cliburn International Piano Competition

The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition has been described as the Olympics for pianists. It's a grueling process to even make the cut. 

This year, nearly 300 pianists applied, 146 were selected for live screening auditions, and 30 were invited to Fort Worth, Texas, in May. And then the competition gets underway: 17 days, with four elimination rounds, and millions of people watching around the world

Ralph Lauer / The Cliburn

Recent claims from elected officials and investigations into Russian election meddling have some wondering about the security of their vote. Today, we find out what the Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County Kansas election boards are doing to protect electronic, paper and absentee ballots.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

While controversy surrounding the president's opposition research has been hogging headlines recently, the practice of digging up dirt on an opponent is as old as politics. In fact, today's first guests, consultants John Hancock and Michael Kelley, say it's essential to a successful campaign.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When Jordan Reeves was born, her mother was the first to notice something was different.

Jordan's mother Jen performed the typical finger-toe count moms do on their newborns and came up five digits short. The baby was missing the bottom half of her left arm, which stopped just after the humerus.

Amidst the chaos of the discovery, Jen and her husband found peace.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Jordan Reeves can get a little annoyed when people stare at her left arm, but "I ask them if they have any questions for me," the 11-year-old says. Today, we speak with Reeves about her multifaceted work spreading acceptance of limb difference. Then, we meet a couple of sportsmen who take to Midwest streams and lakes to pull stubborn catfish out of the water by hand. It's a practice with many names, but the most fun one to say is "noodling."

Pages