Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: KC Fashion Week / Where Science & Religion Meet
  • Tuesday: Earthquakes & Oil in Central U.S. / Reunited States of America / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: Kansas City Mayor Sly James / Local Listen
  • Thursday: Trigger Happy / Building a Better Block / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: 7 Times Science Went Wrong
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For Mayor Sly James, this has been a particularly busy time. On Tuesday evening, he gave his State of the City Address, which we discuss today, along with a bond proposal James says will trim, but not fix, a backlog of public works projects in Kansas City, Missouri.

Sarah Craig/Faces of Fracking / Flickr - CC

While scientists have gained a clearer understanding of what's causing recent earthquakes in the Great Plains, they haven't reached a point where people can let their guard down. That's according to Heather DeShon, associate professor and seismologist at Southern Methodist University.

"The earthquakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas ... have been linked to a process called wastewater injection," she says.

In that process, large volumes of salty, briny water are deposited into cavities in deep rock layers, says DeShon.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr Creative Commons

Earthquakes in the Central U.S. have been steadily increasing due to oil production, gas extraction and disposal of wastewater. Seismologist Heather DeShon tells us if it is possible to mitigate the number of occurrences. Then, finding political common ground between parties. Mark Gerzon, president of the Mediators Foundation, explores cross-party cooperation in his most recent book, The Reunited States of America.

Kansas City Fashion Week

Kansas City takes the nickname 'Paris of the Plains' seriously, and not just because of our fountains. Today, we learn why Kansas City Fashion Week has designers, photographers, models, makeup artists, and stylists gathered in the Heartland. Then, the director of the Vatican Observatory looks at the intersection of religion and science. He'll also answer an "age-old" question for us: Should extraterrestrials be baptized?

Film Sience, and XYZ Films

This weekend's recommendations will have you tapping into a multitude of emotions. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics are presenting educational and historical documentaries, melancholic dramas, and some very quirky — and at times very dark — comedies. 

Steve Walker

The Last Word, R

Platige Films

It's an exciting year for the Kansas City FilmFest. Today, we preview the high-profile guests coming to town, the inclusion of the Dog Film Festival, and the top Midwest films of the year, like Big Sonia.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When Mamie Hughes first came to Kansas City, back in the early 1950s, things were a bit different than they are now.

"I used to wish I had a dollar for every time I was called n-----," says the 87-year-old.

Maj. Geoff Legler / Oklahoma National Guard

Donald Trump took over the Oval Office two months ago, and his trade policies are having an effect. Today, we'll find out how his search for better deals is creating divisions in Dawson County, Nebraska. Then, learn how building techniques, borrowed from construction practices in hurricane zones, can help Tornado Alley homes stand up to spring's strong winds.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As a former county lawmaker, teacher, community planner, advocate and volunteer, Mamie Hughes has had a lasting impact on Kansas City. Today, we look at life of one of the metro's most dedicated activists.

Then, we meet the enthusiastic conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, and ask what it's been like leading "America's Orchestra" for more than 20 years.

Writers Guild Foundation

Despite its shoestring budget and remarkably short shooting schedule, High Noon is revered among cinephiles. Today, author Glenn Frankel reveals how the 1952 film reflects the turbulent political climate of the Red Scare. Then: Buildings can affect our sleep, what we eat and how we feel.

Process Media

St. Patrick's Day Weekend is here! Wear your green proudly as Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critic Steve Walker leads you to a movie pot of gold at the end of the cinematic rainbow!

Steve Walker

Wolves, R

Typical sports movie clichés are superseded by a strong script, director, and cast (headed by Michael Shannon) telling a gritty story about a high school basketball phenom and his alcoholic, gambler father and enabling mother.

United States Mission Geneva / Wikimedia Commons--CC

The Band's legendary final performance was over 40 years ago, but their fame lives on. The hit group's lead guitarist, Robbie Robertson, shares stories from the time he wrote "The Weight" in one night to jamming with Bob Dylan.

United States Mission Geneva / Wikimedia Commons

Former Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius says she thinks it will take the state “decades” to recover from the effects of the state’s current financial woes.

In an appearance Friday on KCUR’s Up to Date, Sebelius was asked by host Steve Kraske what she made of the state today.

“Well, it breaks my heart,” Sebelius says, noting that the state’s revenue stream had always been “a carefully balanced dance, with a third coming from property tax, a third coming from sales tax and a third coming from income tax.”

Baylor University

Not every undocumented migrant crossing our southern border makes it. Remains of those who die in the attempt are found in the open and in unmarked graves. Meet the anthropologist using forensics to return skeletal remains to waiting families. Then KU's Lisa McLendon says "it's all about attitude" when it comes to grammar. Her passion for sentence structure and punctuation led her to write a workbook about it.

Phil Roeder / Wikimedia Commons

Warning: you may want to change your March Madness brackets.  We speak with the Kansas University professor who has developed a model to statistically predict the Final Four in the NCAA tournament. Then, we meet John Gibson, the new chairman of the Democratic Party in Kansas, and find out what makes him hopeful for his party in such a red state.

moneyinc.com

The replacement of the Affordable Care Act, is currently making its way through Congress. As President Trump has said, healthcare "is an unbelievably complex subject," and the American Health Care Act is certainly raising concerns from those covered by Obamacare. Today,  we take your questions on how existing coverage could be affected if the AHCA is passed.

Flickr-CC

It can be hard for parents to have a genuine talk with their teen-aged children without it ending up as awkward, emotional, or even worse, unproductive. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw discusses what is, and isn't, valid in a conversation with your teen.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump has referred to major media outlets such as The New York Times and CNN as "the enemy of the American people." But what does that unwanted title mean for journalists, and journalism itself, moving forward? We bring in the Media Critics to answer that one. Also, should a news outlet assign reporters based on race? Find out what our panel thinks about the recent lawsuit between a local reporter and television news station involving that very issue.

www.kedifilm.com

For the upcoming weekend, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics Steve Walker and Bob Butler, are in agreement about their movie recommendations. The picks are sure to appeal to ardent admirers of documentaries and drama. 

Kedi, Unrated

The documentary about the stray cats of Istanbul, Turkey demonstrates -- in vignettes both moving, and yes, even to a dog person, adorable -- why the city's residents feel like they are "on the same frequency" as their beloved felines.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

If you're looking for a public-service job in law enforcement, the Johnson County Sheriff's Office wants to talk to you.

That's according to Sheriff Calvin Hayden, who says his department is a long way from where they need to be staffed — 50 uniformed deputies short, to be exact.

"That's our huge issue right now," he says. "Recruiting is our No. 1 priority for this year."

Hayden, who took office in January, attributed the deficiency to the increased criticism law enforcers are receiving.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The saying "let's get the hell out of Dodge" exists for a reason. Back in its day, Dodge City, Kansas, was the roughest, toughest town people dared to stop in. Author Tom Clavin, used his obsession with the Wild West to write a book on how the city got its infamous reputation. Also, we speak with the new sheriff of Johnson County, Calvin Hayden, about how he's balancing the safety of his deputies with increasing staffing shortfalls and overtime pay.

Missouri Auditor's Office

Today, bestselling author and political activist Francine Prose shares her thoughts on the importance of the written word. She says the First Amendment is under threat, and explains why what we write counts now more than ever. Then, we speak with Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway, who says certain executive payments the University of Missouri System awards break the law.

Wikimedia Commons

The Vietnam War didn't end silently, it went out to the loud riffs of rock n' roll. Revisit the songs that shaped the 1960s and '70s, and captured the moods of soldiers overseas and civilians at home. We also find out how the electric guitar became the international symbol of freedom, danger and rebellion.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Bloch family has given a lot to Kansas City, including a donation of 29 masterworks by Impressionist and Post-Impressionist artists of the late 19th century to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Today we're live from the Bloch Galleries, previewing the collection's new home inside the museum. 

Toronto International Film Festival

It looks like Kansas City is in for another unseasonably warm weekend, which is great for outdoorsy-types and bugs. For those of us who shun the sun, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critic Steve Walker has some movie recommendations that will please anyone, from action-loving misanthropes to historically-minded hermits. These flicks may not be in theaters for much longer, so catch them while you still can!

The Salesman, PG-13

Senate Democrats / Flickr - CC

From his vantage point in the U.S. Senate, Sheldon Whitehouse is of the mind that the longstanding tradition of honor in American politics is disappearing. Today, he argues corporate infiltration into the political system is to blame.

Why Two Sci-Fi Creators Call Kansas City Home

Mar 3, 2017
Kansas City Public LIbrary

When you think of the entertainment industry, Los Angeles or New York probably come to mind. But Kansas City?

As it turns out, the City of Fountains is home to two science fiction storytellers who are at the top of their game. Jason Aaron  writes comics for Marvel, and Bruce Branit creates visual effects for several popular television shows. 

Why Kansas City?

Banit was born here, graduated here and wanted to raise a family here.

Will O'Neill / Flickr - CC

Today we ask the Ethics Professors which services the government is (and is not) morally obligated to provide its citizens. Health care? Education? A good-paying job? Then, KCUR's Sam Zeff fills us in on a Kansas Supreme Court ruling with major implications for education funding and equity.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

In many ways, Kansas City, Kansas, is a tale of two cities: growing wealth and optimism out west, dilapidation and empty houses in the east. But Mark Holland, city mayor and CEO of the Unified Government of Wyandotte County, holds out hope.

"We've never had more capital investment, we've never had more job growth, we've never been on a higher upswing in terms of morale in our community," he says.

At his State of the Government Address on Feb. 28, Holland laid out his plans to keep that momentum going.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor Mark Holland speaks with host Steve Kraske about the State of the Government Address he presented on February 28, noting the progress made in Wyandotte County, and what more needs to be done. Also, our Political Pundits examine President Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress.

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