Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up to Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: Special Programming
  • Tuesday: Love, Marriage and Mental Health / Statehouse Blend
  • Wednesday: Children's Health and Development: Milestones / Local Listen
  • Thursday: Kansas Poet Laureate Kevin Rabas / Sidney Blumenthal on Lincoln / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: Television: A Biography / The Politics of Morgan Fairchild
Music Box Films

What do America's first celebrity chef, a poetry biopic and a heavyweight boxing drama have in common? Hint: They are your weekend plans, courtesy of Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics. With an extra day off from work comes more time to lay low and take in a film — or four! It'll be well worth your while.

Steve Walker

A Quiet Passion, PG-13

Helen Sloan / IFC Midnight

From a sci-fi drama about survival in a post-apocalyptic world to a documentary about the life of celebrity chef Jeremiah Tower, there's almost too many options now showing in theaters. Fear not! Up To Date's Film Critics are here to help curate the wild world of cinema.

Joan Marcus

In America, the split between conservatives and liberals can be dramatic. Today, we find out how the concept of American exceptionalism can divide and separate us from ourselves and our Western counterparts. Then,  Actors' Equity president Kate Shindle makes the economic argument to keep funding of the National Endowment for the Arts in the federal budget. She also talks about her role and the issues explored in the groundbreaking musical Fun Home.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

Monday's bombing in Manchester, England, shows the global war on terrorism has been unsuccessful thus far in stopping extremist violence. Today, former Department of State advisor Steven Koltai suggests a new approach to stopping the bloodshed: encouraging entrepreneurship.

Robert Drózd / Wikimedia Commons

John Scofield continues to make strides in the music world. His latest album, Country For Old Men, won the 2016 Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. Today, the renowned guitarist recalls playing with the likes of Miles Davis and Charles Mingus.

The University of Edinburgh

Nearly all your Web activity — from Google searches to your Amazon shopping cart — is saved, stored, and used to individualize the internet to you, or at least what an algorithm thinks is you. Today, we find out how your online footprint creates a digital profile, and where that profile goes wrong. Then, we consider whether the paradigm through which prospective reformers view problems in the education system needs to be changed.

Rene Ehrhardt / Flickr - CC

Should doctors and judges be able to decide on an infant's end-of-life care, even if it goes against the wishes of the child's parents? Does a presidential adviser owe his or her personal loyalty to their boss?

IFC Films

City planning flare-ups, folk-rock, and a poetry biopic ... if these aren't movie topics appropriate for a public radio audience, nothing is. This weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics will give you the chance to revel in your nerdy-ness, and learn a little history in the process. We'd be lying if we claimed to be too cool for some popcorn and a well-crafted flick that features zero actual explosions.

Steve Walker

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City Mayor Sly James last week unveiled a plan for a new terminal  at Kansas City International Airport funded privately by engineering firm Burns & McDonnell.

The firm proposes to foot the bill for the terminal in exchange for exclusive rights to design and construction. They’d be paid back over time with airport fees usually collected by the city. 

James and other city leaders hope to get the project approved by voters in November, and they're anxious to get moving. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR

There's a new proposal from architecture firm Burns & McDonnell that would use private money to fund construction of a new terminal to replace existing facilities at Kansas City International Airport.

Tech. Sgt. Linda Burger / Iowa National Guard

Midwesterners are used to extreme weather. We take pride in enduring everything from torrential downpours to the most desiccating drought.

Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of these fluctuations between drought and flood, though, according to new research published by scientists at the University of Kansas, and this "weather whiplash" will deteriorate the quality of drinking water.

Lynsey Addario

Your job might be challenging, but Lynsey Addario's is literally a battlefield. She's been injured, ambushed, and kidnapped while working as a photojournalist in war-torn countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. Today, we learn why the results motivate her to continue crafting stories out of conflict. Then, the life of a major league ace isn't all about 100 mile-per-hour fastballs ... or is it? We talk about the evolution of pitching with writer Terry McDermott.

Did you know John Adam's wife, Abigail, would hang wet laundry in the Public Audience Chamber? Or that Abraham Lincoln never slept in the Lincoln Bedroom? West Wing Reports founder and White House beat journalist Paul Brandus shares a history of The Oval Office and what it is like to cover the Trump administration.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Sports fans in Kansas City and beyond are generally a forward-thinking bunch — “There’s always next year,” goes the rallying cry. But what keeps fans coming back for more is a healthy sense of history and, as commentator Victor Wishna explains in “A Fan’s Notes,” an occasional blast from the past. 

Toronto International Film Festival

Sir Winston Churchill is revered as one of history's greatest politicians due to his leadership during World War II, but the British Bulldog also had a soft spot for science. Today, we hear about his rediscovered essays on the environment, anatomy and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Then, we explore the life of John Coltrane with the writer and director of a new documentary about the jazz legend's career.

Richard Nixon Presidential Library

Before President Donald Trump's thin-skinned, media-obsessed administration over a country deeply divided, there was Richard M. Nixon. Historian John A. Farrell's new biography includes astonishing revelations about the 37th president that have some drawing political parallels to the current chief executive.

Well Go USA Entertainment

Chocolates and flowers are gifts you could give for Mother's Day. But how about a gift you should give? Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics suggest one of these movies for a date night with Mom (dinner plans not included).

Steve Walker

Hounds of Love, Not rated

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Cycling 10,000 miles would be plenty of work for anyone. For Sara Dykman it's a labor of love.

The Johnson County native is pedaling her way from the mountains of Central Mexico all the way up to Southern Ontario, Canada, following the migratory pattern of millions of monarch butterflies.

"I love animals," Dykman says. "I like the underdogs — and lots of insects are ignored — but there is this one beautiful butterfly that everyone can get behind."

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The monarch butterfly migration is one of the most beautiful phenomena in nature. Today, we speak with an Overland Park native who is following the migration on her bike, a 10,000-mile trip. Then, we shine a spotlight on Angel Flight Central, a Kansas City charity staffed by volunteer pilots who fly patients in need to essential medical care.

Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoman Collection / Doubleday

Even suave people blunder a bit here and there, but research suggests those weird traits have some advantages. Today, we look at the science behind social awkwardness. Then, we learn how vast new oil wealth among Oklahoma's Osage tribe engendered a heart-rending greed that led to a series of murders in the 1920s, and helped the fledgling FBI make a name for itself.

Netflix

The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why has received praise and criticism for how it approaches weighty topics such as teen bullying, sexuality, mental illness and suicide. Today we speak with psychologist Wes Crenshaw, who says the drama can encourage important discussions between parents and their children.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For many people, it is a career change, a promotion, or maybe an industry award that propels their professional life to the next level.

For Tom Toro, it was the first time he sold a cartoon to The New Yorker.

"It happened in a very modern way," says Toro. "My life changed via email."

It seems like a somewhat underwhelming email. The subject line, Toro says, read simply, 'Okay.'

Aidan Monaghan / LCOZ Holdings, LLC

Rest easy: You don't have to traverse the dense jungle of the Amazon to discover something worth watching this weekend. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have already surveyed the untamed wilderness of the movie industry, and have emerged with recommendations you can watch from the comfort of your friendly local theater.

Cynthia Haines

Frantz, PG-13

Taber Andrew Bain / Flickr - CC

As V-E Day approaches, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Rick Atkinson discusses the lasting impact and significance of World War II. Then, many consumers remain wary of check-cashing and payday-lending businesses. We speak with a professor of city planning who worked as a check casher in New York City to research the industry and find out why low- and middle-income Americans are using them in increasing numbers.

Jalisco Campus Party / Flickr - CC

Are all those April showers making your May flowers feel a little soggy? Today, we get tips for late-spring gardening from the Kansas City Community Gardens. Also, we speak with Kevin Mitnick about how hackers can use digital know-how and social engineering to work their way into your computer. Mitnick gave up hacking after a five-year stint in prison for computer-related crimes. Now he helps companies and governments secure their own digital networks.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Renowned historian David McCullough has produced many books and speeches that touch on the country's stories and accomplishments. In a new collection, he samples those words to remind readers of The American Spirit. Then, Kansas City cartoonist Tom Toro shares his approach to successfully churning out editorial satire.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

There have been some hits and some misses during President Donald Trump's first 100 days in office. One thing everyone agrees on is there has been no shortage of surprises. Today, we hear from a distinguished panel of political observers; ABC News analyst Matthew Dowd, Time magazine editor-at-large David Von Drehle, and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial writer Colleen Nelson, of the Kansas City Star. They discuss the early days of the new executive administration.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Alexander Heffner thinks a lot about how to get millennials engaged in politics. Perhaps because he is one himself. Today, the host of PBS' The Open Mind, talks about framing old policy arguments in new ways and whether the media is fulfilling its civic duty. Then, we learn about the life of a Kansas City mermaid who — gasp! — doesn't like seafood!

Protagonist Pictures

What better way to spend a dreary weekend than taking in a few good movies at your local independent theater? If you have a hard time making up your mind, let Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics help out with their latest recommendations. They'll ensure your hair stays dry, but maybe not your eyes.

Steve Walker

Graduation, R

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