Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is a daily radio show that explores what really matters to the people in the Kansas City area. We tell the stories of our city and region from the bottom up and through the perspective of individuals. We are an inclusive forum that explores art, ideas and how the news affects lives and communities.

THIS WEEK:

Monday: SPECIAL

Tuesday: Annual Bicycle Show

  • Eric Rogers, executive director and co-founder, Bike Walk KC
  • Deb Ridgeway, bike pedestrian coordinator, KCMO
  • Mitch Williams, current member and former board member, KC Metro Bicycle Club

Wednesday: Addiction, Recovery and Alcoholics Anonymous / Judith G. Levy and her Family

  • Dan Margolies, editor, Heartland Health Monitor, KCUR
  • Matthew Warner Osborn, author, Rum Maniacs: Alchoholic Insanity In The Early American Republic, assistant professor of history, University of Missouri - Kansas City
  • Judith G. Levy, artist

Thursday: Leaving High School / Archery / Dance Floor Democracy

  • Sherri Tucker, author, Dance Floor Democracy

Friday: Food Critics: Herbs

  • Charles Ferruzza, The Pitch
  • Mary Bloch, Around the Block

LAST WEEK:

Monday: What Is Folk Music? (Encore)

Tuesday: Rosedale Ridge / Low-Income Housing

Wednesday: George Hodgman: Bettyville / Climax Springs

Thursday: Future Of The Kansas City Star /  Tell KCUR

Friday: ScreenTime: Game of Thrones

Keith Williamson / Flickr, Creative Commons

So, you want to go into business for yourself. Live the dream. Become your own boss. What's the best attitude to have going into it, and what are the practical steps you should take to lay the groundwork? Plus, how to ensure you're building a dream, rather than a nightmare.

Guests:

Paul Andrews

Back-breaking labor makes people colorless.

That's how artist Hung Liu remembers it, anyway. At the age of 16, she was sent to the Chinese countryside to live and work without a wage as part of Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution. High school had filled her head with too much non-proletarian knowledge; she would have to unlearn it all through hard labor. 

"Working in the cornfield, you sweat. In the morning, you pull the wheat with mud all over your hands. We were colorless," Liu says.

Wikimedia Commons

Online dating doesn't seem any worse or fruitful than traditional dating, according to feedback we received this week from avid online daters in the Kansas City area.

Earlier this week, in anticipation of our storytelling event with NPR, "Storied: The Science of Online Dating," we asked our listeners: What are your online dating success and horror stories?

We heard a mix of recounts of dating mishaps and successful couplings.  

When Henrietta Lacks died in 1951, she had no idea that she would change the future of modern medicine forever. Medical researchers used cells harvested from her cervix for research projects that led to countless medical breakthroughs--all without her family's knowledge or consent. The author who uncovered the story explores her years-long obsession with getting to know Henrietta Lacks. 

Guest:

Found Footage Festival

An earnest woman in a peach blazer teaches you how to facercise, or exercise your face, in a truly bizarre VHS recording. Where did this video come from? A thrift store in Kansas City. It's part of a curated, touring collection of found video footage, originating mostly from the 1980s and 1990s.

Guest:

Julie Denesha / KCUR

JJ's restaurant re-opened Wednesday night for dinner in its new location in the West Plaza district of Kansas City, Mo., inside the Polsinelli Building at 900 W. 48th Place.

It's been a work in progress for more than 11 months. When a natural gas explosion destroyed the original location in February 2013, it was questionable if the popular meeting spot would ever recover. 

In the days following the explosion that left server Megan Cramer dead, JJ’s co-owner Jimmy Frantze couldn’t even bring himself to look at the building.

Online dating has opened up new ways to make first impressions. What happens after that depends as much as ever on the whims of chemistry and compatibility. But what informs that first impression? OK Cupid's Christian Rudder has mined his site's data and concluded that race has more to do with it than most of us acknowledge.

Guest:

A year and a half after a natural gas explosion destroyed an iconic off-Plaza restaurant, the business is reopening. Its noteworthy wine collection remains a draw, and the old-world ambiance has been recreated. The menu will change little, if at all. Meanwhile, the server killed by the explosion leaves behind a powerful absence. The re-opening is a milestone for regulars who considered JJ's a home away from home.

Guests:

Our city is teeming with people who dream of writing that novel... someday. If those aspiring writers decided to turn their literary dreams into reality, where would they begin? Our guests offer advice and personal stories in honor of National Novel Writing Month.

Guests:

Andrea Nguyen / Flickr--CC

Some slurp them, some swirl them and unfortunately, some cut them up. But with nearly endless varieties (even gluten-free), everyone eats noodles.

This week on Central Standard food critics Charles Ferruza, Jen Chen and Mary Bloch discussed Asian noodles of all sorts from the slurpy noodles in Vietnamese pho to the more saucy pad thai.

Here are their recommendations:

High standards. A desire for greater control. A predisposition toward anxiety or depression. These traits are common among people who suffer from eating disorders, like anorexia and bulimia. These illnesses are complex, multifaceted and incredibly dangerous. Body image is just the tip of the iceberg.

Guests:

  • Dr. Ashley McCune, counselor, InSight
  • Jon Smith, patient in recovery

KU researcher Akiko Takeyama has been studying "the host" in Japanese society. The host is the male equivalent of the geisha, and became part of the Japanese economy with the decline of the seniority system and a shift from a manufacturing economy to a service economy. Changing gender roles, and expectations that Japanese women be "superwomen," demand that some tasks be outsourced; romance, an imported western concept according to Takeyama, is among them.

Guest:

Frank Morris / KCUR

On Nov. 9, three months will have passed since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot six times by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

The St. Louis suburb that was virtually unknown to the majority of the nation a quarter of a year ago is now almost universally recognized. But for residents of Ferguson, Mo., things have changed irrevocably.

E.C. Boldridge / Marr Sound Archives / UMKC

On Tuesday's Central Standard, Chuck Haddix, who hosts the public radio party known as the Fish Fry, joined a panel of guests in the studio to talk about the changing landscape for music collectors.

The consensus: Vinyl isn't going anywhere. If anything, it's seeing a revival, in the Kansas City area and elsewhere.

Patrick Quick / KCUR

How are the elements of pride, care and luck-of-the-find translating from the tangible world of the record collector to the digital world of, well, everyone else? Plus, news from local record stores and a recent release from Numero Records, featuring music recorded in Missouri's limestone mines between 1967 and 1973.

Guests:

With just one day left before midterm elections, this conversation explores how our behavior at the polls -- and even the decision to either get out and vote or stay home -- is influenced by personality, emotion, group affilation. In short, plenty having little if anything to do with cold hard facts.

Guests:

Paul Andrews

Portrait Sessions are intimate conversations with the compelling personalities who populate our area. Each conversational portrait is paired with a photographic portrait by Paul Andrews.

"I am the bone of the bone of them that live in trailer homes."

Gina Kaufmann / KCUR

Many Royals fans couldn't afford tickets to the World Series, but they wanted to be as close as possible to the historic game. Hear how they "watched" the game from the parking lot. 

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A Kansas race that is catching attention from political junkies around the country has Kansas City-area voters captivated, too.

That’s according to feedback we heard on social media in response to our Tell KCUR question of the week. We asked, “What’s the most important political race to you in election 2014? Why?

“KS Gov race for sure! Need child advocates,” Alexis Ceule (@AlexisCeule) tells us on Twitter.

Jon Feinstein / Flickr, Creative Commons

In late October, as the leaves begin to rustle and the winds begin to moan, our thoughts turn to night frights and all things ghoulish. In partnership with the ongoing 100 Ghost Stories project at Wonder Fair in Lawrence, Central Standard presents three ghost stories by writers with local ties.

In order of increasing scariness:

Ghost Feelings, by Mick Cottin

Caroline, by Megan Kaminski

Monitored, by BJ Hollars

A two-acre cemetery in downtown Kansas City, Kan. is one of the few public reminders of the Wyandot Nation, whose trail of tears brought them to the area in the early 19th century. Yet the Wyandot had an influence on what was to become Wyandotte County, as well as Kansas' civil war history.

Guests:

Samuel Goldwyn Films and Paramount Home Media Distribution

When Casey Twenter came up with the idea for the movie Rudderless, starring Billy Crudup and directed by William H. Macy, he was a Kansas City guy working at an advertising agency. This conversation shares Twenter's story and offers insight into his on-screen exploration of parenthood and loss, love and guilt.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

Right in the center of downtown Kansas City, Kan., between the public library and government buildings just off Minnesota Avenue, is a little two-acre cemetery.

The sign reads "Huron Indian Cemetery," but it’s also known as the Wyandot National Burying Ground. Over the years this place has been a gathering spot and a sacred place for members of the Wyandot Nation, but it has also been the site of controversy, confusion and a curse.

Kate Hiscock / Flickr, Creative Commons

With eaters taking an interest in food extending beyond recipes, food writing is gaining a voracious audience. Food can be a character, or a source of potent metaphor. It can also tell us something important about ourselves and our society. Kansas City experts offer insights and recommendations.

Guests and their recommendations:

Cat Neville, founder, Feast Magazine

Controversy has swirled around the Bainbridge apartment complex on Armour Boulevard for years. A legal back-and-forth has accompanied the city's designation of the property as socially blighted. This discussion addresses larger issues about low-income housing and how it is -- and sometimes isn't -- integrated into the fabric of a neighborhood.

Guests:

File photo / KCUR

During this election season, are you focusing your voting attention on Congressional seats or local City Council races?

Are any Constitutional amendments more significant to you or do you spend your energy following candidates running for state offices?

Kansas may be under the national spotlight for its governor’s contest, but we know there are a lot of other candidates and issues at stake on both sides of the state line next week on Election Day.

Gina Kaufmann / KCUR

Knowing the story behind your digestibles is a popular trend in the food world, and coffee is no exception.

The roasters, shop owners and baristas who subscribe to the idea that coffee is a delicacy to be handled with precision, ritual and care are participating in a wave of coffee culture known as the "third wave."

The first wave in coffee is the vacuum-sealed tin-can variety from a large factory, for anyone to brew in any old coffee machine. The second wave is characterized by Starbucks, which many credit with introducing the idea of coffee as a specialty item.

madame.furie / Flickr-CC

For some, coffee is simply a quick way to perk up and start the work day. But for others, a lovingly roasted coffee with steamed milk and all the accoutrements is the source of near-religious worship. 

On this week's Food Critics, Charles Ferruzza, Emily Farris, Jenny Vergera and some callers helped narrow down which coffee houses and shops have the best cup of Joe in the Kansas City metro.

Here are their picks: 

Bill Fischer

Enough with the pity!

For Kansas City Royals fans who live outside the region, it’s a brand new world.

“The last lot of years, I have gotten a lot of pity looks and sympathy whenever I wear my gear or say I'm a Royals fan,” says Tara reid-O’Brien, who lives in Las Vegas. “And I have just told people ‘just you wait.’”

Before First Fridays took off, most people in Kansas City would have been hard-pressed to identify a local arts district. But the Crossroads district has since attracted attention from throughout the city and beyond. And other arts districts have popped up around it. How will the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art's plans for a midtown cultural district fit into the bigger picture?

Guests:

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