Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is a daily radio show that explores what really matters to the people in the Kansas City area. We tell the stories of our city and region from the bottom up and through the perspective of individuals. We are an inclusive forum that explores art, ideas and how the news affects lives and communities.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: Transgender Safety In Kansas City
  • Tuesday: Ten Years After: The Impact Of Hurricane Katrina On Kansas City
  • Wednesday: Dial-A-Down Inventors / Tiny House Movement in Kansas City
  • Thursday: Christian Influence In Urban Kansas City / Tell KCUR: Your Summer Jam
  • Friday: ScreenTime: "Straight Outta Compton"
badjonni / Flickr--CC

Summer breezes may make you feel fine, but for many, summertime is all about the music.

We wanted to build a summer 2015 playlist, so we asked, “What’s your song of the summer?” on the air and on social media.  

Recently, a local author wrote a blog post, "Onward, Christian Gentry," which questioned how Christians — mainly white, evangelical Christians — approach living in the urban core. What role does faith play in developing urban communities in Kansas City? 

We meet a proponent from the Tiny House Collective, a local group that's all about downsizing and living in much smaller homes — and we discuss what it means for affordability, efficiency and a different way to live.

You've seen it on the field of every football game in the United States — that black-and-orange marker that measures down and distance. It was actually invented in Kansas City. Now, another local guy has created a new version that uses lasers to measure the placement of the ball.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, Kansas Citians who responded to the storm share memories and perspectives. We also retrace the musical pipeline from New Orleans to Kansas City.

Guests:

  • Dan Verbeck, retired broadcaster who covered the storm live, KMBZ and KCUR
  • Micah Herman, Kansas City jazz musician
  • Loren Pickford, New Orleans jazz musician
Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

“She was a young person, out there, struggling to survive on her own.”

That’s how Kris Wade remembers 33-year-old Jasmine Collins. Wade had known Collins for about a year as part of the Justice Project, a non-profit that provides advocacy and services to transgender women in poverty, among others.

With Kansas City's transgender community reeling from news of the violent death of Tamara Dominguez, a 36-year-old woman who was both transgender and latina, concerns about safety for transgender people of color have risen to the surface.

UPDATE: As the show neared its conclusion, a story appeared in The Guardian suggesting another transgender homicide victim in Kansas City this year.

Sylvia Maria Gross/KCUR

Sweet tomatoes served with soft mozzarella cheese, an arugula salad with a watermelon vinaigrette, even an ice cream made with sweet corn ... the best of summer's bounty is ripe for harvesting.

Garden Bounty

Aug 21, 2015

Summer is winding down, and the garden is flourishing. We learn how to make a sponge corn cake in the microwave at Affäre (and we got the recipe, too), a plant sciences professor talks about the agricultural side of corn, then our Food Critics search out the best corn and seasonal vegetable dishes in Kansas City.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Growing up, Amanda Fish used to lock herself in her room to sing. So, her younger sister Samantha Fish would lock herself in her room and play guitar.

"We were independent experiencers," Amanda says.

"She calls it a loner thing, I call it a leader thing," Samantha adds.

Fast-forward through the days of wailing with Tom Waits and rocking out to Nine-Inch Nails, and these two musicians are, sure enough, leading their own blues bands around Kansas City and across the country.

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

Martin Heuser, an eighth generation chef, grew up in Bonn, Germany, where corn is eaten, but not a traditional part of the cuisine. He grew to appreciate fresh, local corn as an ingredient when he lived in Canada. 

"For me, corn is summertime," Heuser said it adds another component and flavor to a dish.

At his restaurant Affäre in the Crossroads, he features it in special recipes when it's in season.

Charlie Parker's birthday is coming up, and Kansas City is all a-twitter. Hear a visiting jazz scholar's take on the history of Bebop, and Kansas City-born Charlie Parker's place in it. Bonus: a recording of a jam session where you can hear the Bird talking.

Guest:

Two sisters, both Blues singers, talk about being creative siblings, and what drives them to make music.

Guests:

  • Samantha Fish, musician, new album: Wild Heart
  • Amanda Fish, musician, new album: Down in the Dirt
Kelly/Flickr -- CC

Charlie Parker was one of the most influential musicians to come out of Kansas City. But how did Kansas City shape him?

“He’s definitely a Kansas City person,” jazz historian Scott DeVeaux told Gina Kaufmann on Central Standard.

“I mean, Kansas City has a rich enough jazz tradition before him, but he’s the one who combines aspects of the local scene, like the local blues scene, in a way that, I think, makes bebop what it is,” DeVeaux said.

Courtesy of Jim Wilson

This weekend, the Ethnic Enrichment Festival sets up shop in Swope Park. How do we think about ethnicity in America today? We invite a professor who focuses on ethnic and cultural studies, the co-founder of the Latino Writer's Collective and a local resident who runs the Indonesia booth to share their thoughts.

Paul Andrews

According to Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, the digital divide is the civil rights issue of the 21st century.

“Having internet access is essential. It’s not a luxury,” she says.

Kositany-Buckner, the deputy director of the Kansas City Public Library, has been working to bridge the digital divide in Kansas City. And the library is the place to do it, she says.

“We provide access to digital content — whether it’s e-books, audio books or research tools you can access online,” says Kositany-Buckner.

With the recent passing of Jesse Hope, the founder and curator of the Old Quindaro Museum and one of the historic township's most dedicated champions, questions arise about the future of the site and its legacy. 

Guest:

  • Laura Ziegler, community engagement reporter, KCUR

Humans and squirrels live side by side in urban and suburban neighborhoods. When humans observe and document these smaller animals in their yards and on their blocks, that isn't just a weird hobby; it informs science. 

Guest:

Recent calls for police body cameras raise questions about documenting truth. An art curator, a war historian and a police major discuss. 

Guests:

Where do you go to interact with your neighbors? Whether it's a soccer field, outdoor movie screening or a gathering of food trucks in a public park — or even a created space that a local artist filled with hammocks — we explore what makes for a good gathering spot.

Open Book

Aug 14, 2015
Paul Andrews

What is the role of the library in the 21st century? The Deputy Director of the Kansas City Public Library discusses her efforts to bridge the digital divide and to archive information — as well as her dream of being a jewelry designer.

Guest:

  • Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, Deputy Director of the Kansas City Public Library.
Jeremy Thompson / Flickr-CC

One local music venue is in a narrow storefront and it doesn’t have a stage. The other is in the East Bottoms.

You’d think these locations wouldn’t work, but the Green Lady Lounge and Knuckleheads Saloon have succeeded in carving out a niche in Kansas City’s music scene — even to the point where Knuckleheads has opened the Garage, a mid-sized venue, next door.

Terry Smemo

If you can’t be at home, find some peace and quiet.

That’s what we heard this week on social media when we asked, “Where are you most comfortable when you’re not at home?”  

Many of the responses were tied to the solace of the outdoors, particularly running trails and the woods. On Facebook, Michelle Hammack said her home away from home is a “dirt road.”

Some people preferred indoor silence.

Coda

Aug 12, 2015

Two local music venues, recordBar and Take 5 Coffee + Bar, recently announced that they looking for new homes. In light of this news, we explore what makes for a good music venue — location or something else? A music blogger/musician and two local music venue owners share their thoughts.

Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art

A Johnson County journalism professor is obsessed with cacti. And a Los Angeles-based artist is obsessed with the journalism professor's obsession with cacti. How did this happen?

Guests:

  • Amir H. Fallah, artist, The Caretaker exhibit at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art
  • Mark Raduziner, professor of journalism, Johnson County Community College

Kansas Representative Gene Suellentrop is a supporter of the Kansas budget experiment known as the "march to zero" for income taxes. In his nephew's social circles, on the east coast, that position is hard to understand. So the nephew decided to immerse himself in his uncle's world, just as a legislative session turned upside-down by budget debates got underway.

Guests:

Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art

Kansas City residents who'd like to experience nature in air-conditioned comfort have the option to do just this inside the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art. Three site-specific installations on display through September explore "what we have taken from nature and what we do to nature," says executive director Bruce Hartman.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Teaching has changed a lot in the past few decades. From standardized testing to ADD diagnosis, technology to policy. But it's not just the classroom that's different. Teachers are going into the profession for different reasons and with different motivations as well. This discussion kicks off KCUR's Teaching It Forward series.

 Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Quantity over quality used to be the mantra for brunch spreads in the past. And who can forget the decorative ice sculptures that presided over a seemingly endless row of buffet tables?

Not anymore.

From chilaquiles to chicken confit hash (along with coffee and cocktails) — that leisurely, mid-morning meal gets a makeover on local menus.

On Friday’s Central Standard, our Food Critics Charles Ferruzza, Mary Bloch and Emily Farris uncover the best brunch dishes in Kansas City.

Long and leisurely and sometimes boozy, brunch is a delicious mid-morning ritual. A food historian talks about how the egg became an American breakfast staple, and our Food Critics search out the best brunch dishes in Kansas City.

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