Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is a daily radio show that explores what really matters to the people in the Kansas City area. We tell the stories of our city and region from the bottom up and through the perspective of individuals. We are an inclusive forum that explores art, ideas and how the news affects lives and communities.

Coming up the week of May 2, 2016:

  • Monday: Weekends
  • Tuesday: Grandmothers Mural / Institutional Betrayal
  • Wednesday: Migration And Storytelling / Itinerant Plein Air Painters
  • Thursday: Mosquitoes / Pow Wow Leader
  • Friday:  Portrait Session: Krystle Warren

We check in with two local artists who, about a year ago, quit their jobs to travel the country in a 16-foot Airstream trailer.

Guests:

Coming to America is a dream, an ideal, for some people. Inspired by a KU project that's collecting stories from African immigrants, we explore the stories behind the migration experience — and how they shape what we know about ourselves and the world.

On Monday, May 9, there's a forum on migration stories at Unity Temple on the Plaza; it's the kickoff event for the KU project.

Guests:

There's a new phrase being used to describe what happens when, say, a government fails to protect its citizens, or a university fails to protect its students. What are the symptoms and side effects of being betrayed by an institution, and are there ways for institutions to make things right?

Guest:

Dorothy Hawkins is one of five women depicted on a mural at 39th and Troost. These are the grandmothers of Manheim Park, according to artist Alexander Austin. In anticipation of Mother's Day, hear how one woman's struggles and hard work made a difference to the people closest to her.

Guest:

  • Dorothy Hawkins, Manheim Park

Working For The Weekend

May 2, 2016
James Carr / Wikipedia

The weekend is a beloved institution. It allows us time "for what we will." It also has a storied past in America. That history, plus an examination of the work week in transition. Are we losing the 40-hour work week and with it the weekend? Or are we gaining flexibility?

Guests:

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From bagels to doughnuts to cookies, there’s a lot going on in KC’s baked-goods scene.

“A lot of people tend to forget that bakeries, in the olden days, were a once-a-week, once-a-day stop,” Food Critic Jenny Vergara told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard.

And with locally-baked goods, she said, some people are puzzled as to why things don’t last on the countertop at home.

Oven And Hearth

Apr 29, 2016

A chat about spring produce (including rhubarb jam) and a quick review of a new bagel shop. Then, KCUR's Food Critics search out the best bakeries in and around Kansas City.

Guests:

Wikimedia Commons

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: What does it mean to be a "Renaissance Man" today? Hint: it's more than being an expert multi-tasker. 

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

"Witchy, tacky grandma."

That’s how Kansas City artist Rodolfo Marron III describes his aesthetic.

“I say it as a joke, but it’s kind of accurate,” he says. “My work is softer, maybe more effeminate. I embrace that.”

Growing up on the city's Westside during the 1990s, Marron experienced a rougher neighborhood than the one many know it as now. He lost many family friends to gang violence during a time he remembers as dark and gray. At an early age, he found escape in his art by creating characters and other worlds.

From research to relationships, from the laboratory to the living room, there's a lot going on in the world of Alzheimer's. In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we share the voices of Alzheimer's patients, stories from caregivers and a progress report from a leading scientist. 

Guests:

Ronnie Burt's job, as president and CEO of Visit KC, is to make Kansas City appealing to people who don't live here. What are the selling points, and what holds us back?

Guest:

  • Ronnie Burt, president and CEO, Visit KC
Charlotte Street Foundation

Rodolfo Marron is an artist who grew up in the 1990s, on Kansas City's West Side. It was a grittier place back then, he says. For an escape, he started creating characters who inspired him. Now, he draws on Kansas City stories and the materials that grow wild in backyards and along highways.

Guest:

Brian Rogers

Story of a Song is a monthly segment on KCUR's Central Standard, in which local musicians tell the story behind a recent song, and explain how it was constructed musically.

The Musicians: Emcee Morgan Cooper (aka Barrel Maker) and producer Brian Rogers (aka Lion)

If you like to learn about the inner lives of musicians, as though they're the friends or older siblings who are way cooler than you, then music podcasts might just be your thing. This show compiles great music podcasts with an emphasis on the musician-interview approach, plus a handful of new, non-music podcasts to refresh your general playlist. Timed in anticipation of KCUR's upcoming Podcast Party featuring Central Standard and The Grisly Hand. 

Guests:

Wikipedia

Does the Kansas we see in The Wizard of Oz have anything to do with the Kansas on this side of the rainbow? From tornadoes to costumes to politics, we explore the different interpretations of this classic American film.

Guests:

It's that subconscious little kernel of prejudice that probably exists within all of us. We explore implicit bias: where it comes from, how it influences our decisions and what we can do about it.

Guests:

Coy Dugger / KCUR 89.3

Stepping through the doors of the Harry J. Epstein Co. hardware and surplus shop in downtown Kansas City, Missouri is like stepping through time.

At first glance, Epstein’s looks like an old-fashioned, everyday hardware store. The shelves are lined with packages of bolts, and bins are stocked with piles of steel hand tools. 

But not all of the items are what you would find in an everyday tool shed. Some of Epstein’s more unusual products would make even the most proficient garage guru green with envy.

It's spring, and the sound of lawn mowers is starting to echo around town. We explore what lawns mean to us: Why do we love caring for them, and does environmental progress mean rethinking the concept of our grassy domain?

Guests:

Coy Dugger / KCUR

Hardware store memories are about more than that tell-tale hardware store smell. How the story of industry in Kansas City mirrors the story of hardware stores, and what communities lose as those mom n' pop neighborhood shops fall away. Plus, how one of the oldest hardware stores in town has reinvented itself to survive. Hint: it involves a flying dolphin.

Guests:

Jane Austen lived centuries ago, yet she still inspires best-sellers and box-office hits. What's the secret to her staying power? This is a search for the authors who embody those Austen-esque qualities today, including some unexpected picks that might surprise you. Plus, a second look at Austen's least popular novel: Mansfield Park.

Guests:

Pixabay

I remember getting rid of my cassette tapes.

Through the early 2000s, when my journalism career was just beginning, I drove a beat-up used car built in 1991. The bonus was, it had a tape deck. And I had a great collection of music on tapes.

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It’s been a mild winter, which means we’re getting a jump on ice cream season.

Whether it’s served in a cup or cone, ice cream (and its friends: custard, gelato, sorbet, soft serve and more) is the classic treat that feels like an indulgence.

On Friday’s Central Standard, KCUR’s Food Critics search out the best ice cream in and around Kansas City.

Here are their recommendations:

Mary Bloch, Around the Block:

Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

It's hard to escape the Missouri River's influence in Kansas City. Even if you don't live immediately next to its winding banks, it's tough to get around a river that cuts straight through the heart of the metro area. And you've no doubt heard the phrases "north of the river" and "Big Muddy" at least once.

We visit the kitchen of a local chef to learn how to make ice cream if you don't have an ice cream maker (hint: it involves bananas ... and some liqueur, if you're so inclined), then KCUR's Food Critics search out the best ice cream in and around KC.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

If you have seen the show "Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood" — or, in other words, if you have infant children — you probably know about "banana swirl." Or, you should, according to Rachel Ciordas.

"Mothers who listen [to this segment] are either going to love me or hate me for mentioning this," Ciordas laughs as she launches into the tale that introduced her family to this beloved dessert.

Ian T. McFarland/Flickr -- CC

What should we do with the Missouri River and the land around it? From seeing more barges on the river to letting the area revert to nature, we dream big and explore the options.

Guests:

Inspired by KCUR's series, When I'm 64, we examine the future of retirement. Will it still be around for future generations, or will it become something entirely different?

Guests:

Tax Waver

Apr 13, 2016

You've seen them on the sidewalk outside those tax places, waving to all who pass by. Meet the man behind the Statue of Liberty costume.

Neighborhood Radio

Apr 12, 2016

Two local organizations are gearing up to start low-power FM stations to broadcast to specific communities within a 3-5 mile radius of the broadcast location. One of them, broadcasting from the Mutual Musicians Foundation, will focus on local jazz, gospel and soul at 18th and Vine. The other has an educational and community service mission. What's the story?

Guests:

  • Lewis George Walker, co-founder, KUAW 98.5 FM
  • James McGee, general manager, KOJH 104.7
commons.wikimedia.org

1992 is calling and it wants its cassette tapes back: a local record store can't keep tapes in stock, a St. Joseph pawn shop sells tape decks as quickly as they come in, and a Springfield-based cassette manufacturer just had its best year since 1969. Sounds like a cassette-tape revival to us.

Guests:

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