Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is a daily radio show that explores what really matters to the people in the Kansas City area. We tell the stories of our city and region from the bottom up and through the perspective of individuals. We are an inclusive forum that explores art, ideas and how the news affects lives and communities.

THIS WEEK:

  • Monday: Iconic Architecture and Modernism in Kansas City
  • Tuesday: 1974 Ozark Music Festival in Sedalia /Change In Fictional Characters (Atticus from Mockingbird to Watchman)
  • Wednesday: Actor Mark Patton / KU Professor A. Townsend on Temperature and Bird Diversity
  • Thursday: Mexican American Soft-Pitch Softball / Social Media Harrassment At College
  • Friday: FOOD: Pie vs. Cake
Caroline Kull / KCUR

Pull in to the tiny Nelle Belle’s diner (pronounced “nell-ee bells”) on U.S. Highway 69 in Claycomo any weekday morning, and you’re likely to find the parking lot packed.

Gina Kaufmann / KCUR

In 1966, the Kansas City Board of Trade Building was new. Then it got old. Now, the iconic modern structure is getting a makeover. How do you transform an iconic piece of architecture, and what's the state of modernism in the Kansas City area?

Guests:

Gina Kaufmann / KCUR

Modernist architecture flourished in the Kansas City area in the period following World War II, particularly at the time that the Johnson County suburbs were developing in Kansas.

Courtesy photo / Missouri Valley Special Collections -- Kansas City Public Library

What a lot of Kansas Citians love about Midtown is the historic character of the area.

Twenty-two distinct neighborhoods make up what Kansas Citians call Midtown, an area spanning from 31st to 55th streets, former KCUR news director Mary Jo Draper lays out in her book, Kansas City's Midtown Neighborhoods.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Democrat Katheryn Shields, who will take her seat on Kansas City Council on Aug. 1 after a close election win, didn't grow up dreaming of political campaigns, though the Parkville farm where she grew up as an only girl with four older brothers did teach her to be "a bit of a scrapper." 

The Shield

Jul 17, 2015

As she's about to take her seat on the Kansas City, Missouri Council, Katheryn Shields talks about her political career — how she got her start, her accomplishments and how she dealt with with adversaries and scandal.

Kevin Dooley / Flickr--CC

KCUR Announcer Linda Sher's life changed when her high school French teacher challenged her.

Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann credits her love of literature to fond memories of listening to her elementary school teacher read out loud in class.

And I owe my career in journalism to my first-grade teacher, Mrs. Bentley, who turned my weakness in writing into a strength by paying me a little extra attention.

Next week, KU will host a Black Arts Poetry Conference, which will feature readings by poets Frank X. Walker and Kevin Young at the Black Archives of Mid-America. A poet and one of the conference organizers discuss the past, present and future of African American poetry.

Most Kansas Citians have heard of Claycomo — officially called The Village of Claycomo — but how much do we really know about it? The mayor of Claycomo tells us more about his village — and dispels some myths.

What is life like for LGBTQ folks in rural Kansas and Missouri? A Kansas City actor/writer and residents from Kearney, Missouri and Hiawatha and Hays, Kansas share their perspectives.

Heartland, Missouri

Jul 14, 2015
Abigail Keel / KBIA

Heartland, Missouri is an intentional Christian community several miles north of Columbia. A rehabilitation center, a Christian school, a dairy farm -- Heartland is many things. Some people say it changed their lives; others say it was their own living hell.

All Aboard

Jul 14, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

It was smelly, crowded and potentially life-threatening, but riding on a steamboat was de rigeur for travelers to Kansas City in the mid-nineteenth century. For a brief and some might say "golden" era, the steamboat was also the primary agent of settlement and change. How steamboats shaped Kansas City.

Guests:

500 People In The Middle Of A Missouri Cornfield? 'Welcome To Heartland'

Jul 14, 2015

Editor's Note: The following is an excerpt from "Heartland, Missouri," a reporting project from KBIA, a public radio station in Columbia, Missouri. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Heidi Van says that Kansas City needs to send original, locally created theater out into the world every bit as much as it needs a baseball team. That means experimenting on stage, taking risks, re-tooling scenes and sometimes failing. In front of an audience. Get a window into the world of experimental theater in Kansas City. 

Guests:

Something Sour Is Brewing In Kansas City's Beer Scene

Jul 10, 2015
Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

An up-and-coming trend has hit the Kansas City craft brewing scene — sour beer.

Characterized by a distinctly tart flavor, sour beer is full of bacteria and microorganisms, has a higher level of carbon dioxide, and is reminiscent in taste and smell of underripe fruits and overripe cheeses. Sound appealing? For some, it's a delicious refreshment. For others, it is unpalatable.

Fork-Free

Jul 10, 2015

Chocolate hazelnut sea salt, pimento cheese, cilantro pesto aioli ... dips and spreads have gotten fancy on area menus. We talk with a local hummus purveyor, then our food critics uncover the best dips and spreads in Kansas City.

Abdulla Al Muhairi/Flickr -- CC

Dips and spreads are possibly the perfect accompaniment to any meal. They’re relatively easy to make, they’re crowd-pleasers at parties and they’re great showcases for fresh herbs. And really, who doesn’t like a grown-up version of Fun Dip, that candy where you used a chalky tablet as a vehicle to scoop flavored powder into your mouth?

From hummus to pesto to pimento cheese, Food Critics Charles Ferruzza, Mary Bloch and Bonjwing Lee search out the best dips and spreads in Kansas City.

Courtesy photo / Village of Claycomo

Last week, Jim Stoufer went to the Walmart in Liberty at 1 a.m.

He had just gotten off his shift at the Ford Motor Co.’s Kansas City Assembly Plant in Claycomo. The plant had closed for the week for its annual summer maintenance, and local businesses were feeling the effect.

When it comes to refreshing summer drinks, sour isn't a characteristic that usually comes to mind. We invite two local brewers to guide us through the sour beer trend, and our in-house expert samples their wares (for research purposes, of course).

Missouri Valley Special Collections/Kansas City Public Library

Hear the stories of historic Midtown Kansas City, from the heart of Westport to Manheim Park.

Guest:

  • Mary Jo Draper, author, Kansas City's Historic Midtown Neighborhoods
Peggy Lowe / KCUR

The National Council of La Raza is holding its annual conference in Kansas City. The series of events brings together advocates, business leaders, politicians and others around issues of importance to Hispanic populations throughout the United States.

But the organization's name, La Raza, gives some people pause. 

Ford's auto assembly plant in Claycomo employs 6000 auto workers. In a town of only 1500. We explore the relationship between Claycomo the factory and Claycomo the place.

Guests:

  • Dan Verbeck, former KCUR reporter, Northland resident
  • Lonnie Bush, auto worker, Ford
Celeste Lindell/Flickr -- CC

It's a well-known cycle: Artists move into neglected neighborhoods, use their creativity to transform the area, then get priced out. In a recently published article in Lumpen Magazine, two local thinkers wonder, do artists make these places? Or do they just move in? We invite one of those authors and another arts developer in town to discuss.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

As the National Council of La Raza prepares to convene its annual conference in Kansas City, a lively and heartfelt conversation about the term 'la raza' -- translated imperfectly as 'the race', but meaning something closer to 'my tribe', 'the big family' or 'my people'. 

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

The Northland. Kansas City north. Northtown (also spelled Northtowne in some cases.)

Whatever you call the part of the Kansas City metropolitan area north of the Missouri River, we wanted to know more about its boundaries. But the answer is a little muddy.

Fear Factor

Jul 6, 2015
Pixabay

Kids are riding bikes less and less. Some of that has to do with parents' fears, and some of it has to do with a shift in community design (after all, you can only get so far in a cul-de-sac). Parents swap stories, strategies and concerns about getting the elementary-school set back in gear.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Bram Wijnands has made a name for himself as a jazz musician in Kansas City.

After a performance at Carnegie Hall in New York in 1998, he received recognition as Kansas City's Ambassador of Swing from then mayor Emanuel Cleaver, who also designated April 6 "Bram Wijnands Day."

Today, he performs regularly for The Majestic, and has performed at various restaurants and venues around the city, including Kansas City Bier Company and the American Restaurant.

Of The People

Jul 2, 2015
Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

What is folk art? It's a seemingly simple question, but answers may vary. And when you put folk art in a museum... is it still folksy? Stories, insights and observations.

Cyrus Farivar / Flickr--CC

White trash, bigotry, honor and home.

Those were just some of the words that Kansas Citians used to describe the Confederate flag when we asked, "What does the Confederate flag mean to you?" in our online and on-air Tell KCUR poll this week.

The sentiments echoed a national discussion on the Confederate flag in light of recent shootings in Charleston, South Carolina, which has provided a polarizing debate.

Suzanne Hogan, KCUR

The Missouri River plays an important part in Kansas City's history. But for many people today, it's an obstacle that divides our city. We look into how to cross the river if you don't have a car, and discuss what "The Northland" means.

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