Remembering Nate Dogg

Mar 21, 2011

From Homer to Shakespeare, bards have always used verse tell to tell the story of their times. One of hip hop artists best known for this is Nate Dogg – though, instead of stories about Trojan horses, vats of wine, and family feuds, his verses talk about fathers in prison, enjoying malt liquor, and drive by shootings.

On this Central Standard, Jabulani Leffall and Kemet Coleman, a.k.a. The Phantom, break down one of Nate Dogg's most famous songs, "Regulate," and discuss his lyrical skills.

"Nate Dogg was essentially the glue between those who were politically correct and those who weren't," said Coleman. "His vocals bridged that gap between explicit lyrics and syncopation and soulful singing."

Later in the hour, we touch base with Miles Bonny, hip-hop producer and musician, who cited Nate Dogg's influence and inspiration in his own work, as well as his personality. 

"He just looked like himself [on stage]," Bonny said, "not at all the fly sexy crooner or seductive wannabe male that most R&B artists have attributed to them. It's refreshing to see and carried on by all those who were just singing for fun."

Our other guests incluce Smoov Confusion, Hip Hop EmCee, Tech N9ne, Nadia Pflaum of The Pitch, and P. Frank Williams, hip-hop journalist. Tune in for their and KCUR listeners' thoughts on the late great rapper.