Up to Date
11:05 pm
Sun July 22, 2012

Heat, Drought & You

Your neighbors' lawn is green. And yours? A pale shade of brown, with grass that crunches underfoot.

Area golf courses remain emerald and pristine, yet corn fields in Missouri, Arkansas, and elsewhere wither, their kernels destined for silage.

The drought affects each of us a bit differently: Will you spike your water bill just to keep your lawn green, your plants flowering, and your vegetables growing? Can area farmers salvage what little remains of their crops?

Monday on Up to Date, KCUR news director and Harvest Public Media executive supervisor Frank Morris traces the drought down river, and what it means on the farm and for food prices. Rancher Mark Shultz in Northwest Kansas tells us about his crops and cattle, and farmer Eric Neill of Missouri tells us how they're making baleage out of corn that has been assessed as having too little grain to pay for its harvest. 

We also turn our sights to some turn to some good advice about how to care for your lawn and your trees: Mandy Cawby of Johnson County Water District No. 1, and Kansas City, Mo., Water Services Department spokeswoman Amy Jordan Wooden tell us what keeps the water flowing and why they're not instituting restrictions, Mark Nelson, a regional forestry supervisor for the Missouri Department of Conservation Discovery Center shares some thoughts on how to help keep the leaves on your shade trees, and Alan Branhagen of Powell Gardens tells us just how much water your garden needs in this stifling heat.

How's the drought affecting you and your neighborhood?  Join the conversation: call 816 235 2888 during the show, email uptodate@kcur.org, Tweet us @KCURUptoDate, or join KCUR's Facebook discussion.

Related Program