Tom Shine | KCUR

Tom Shine

Tom is the Director of News and Public Affairs. He joins KMUW after spending 37 years with The Wichita Eagle in a variety of reporting and editing roles.

 

Tom grew up in suburban Detroit and graduated from the University of Michigan. He came to Wichita in 1980 to work for the morning Eagle and afternoon Beacon. The Beacon, through no fault of his own, folded a month after he got here.

 

In his role at KMUW, Tom hopes to help his staff provide in-depth, quality news coverage. He also wants to assist in promoting insightful discussion and a better understanding of the key issues facing Wichita and Kansas.

 

Tom and his wife, Sharon, have three children and live in west Wichita. When not at work, Tom enjoys reading non-fiction, attending local sporting events and rooting passionately – sometimes too passionately – for the Michigan football team.

The recent summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jung Un included an agreement to return the remains of American soldiers still missing from the Korean War.

That has caught the interest of the Catholic Diocese of Wichita because one of the missing is Chaplain Emil Kapaun.

Kapaun was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2013 for his bravery in Korea and could become a saint of the Catholic Church. He died in a North Korean prisoner of war camp in 1951.

Wichita police say that Emily Glass, questioned in the disappearance and death of 5-year-old Lucas Hernandez, was found dead early Friday morning.

The American Civil Liberties Union and its Kansas affiliate have filed suit against the Montgomery County Attorney, alleging he failed to follow state law in the use of diversion programs.

The suit was filed Friday with the Kansas Supreme Court, according to a news release from the ACLU. It requests that Montgomery County Attorney Larry Markle be required to create written diversion policies and guidelines; provide written notice of diversion programs to defendants charged in Montgomery County, and hold diversion conferences for defendants offered diversion.

The Kansas Senate has passed a bill that increases the penalties for people who make “swatting” calls.

The bill was sparked by a swatting incident in December in which Andrew Finch was killed by Wichita Police responding to a fake call about a hostage situation at his address.

Swatting involves making a false 911 call to draw law enforcement to an address.

Finch was shot when he came onto his porch to investigate the police activity outside. Police have said Finch disobeyed police commands and was reaching towards his waistband when he was shot.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas has filed a complaint in federal court on behalf of a Wichita man who said he was targeted because he is Muslim and was falsely accused of flying a terrorist flag.

The ACLU said in a news release Monday that it filed a complaint against the Spirit/Boeing Employees’ Association, or SBEA, on behalf of Munir Zanial, who works at Spirit AeroSystems.

SBEA is a member-owned nonprofit open to current or former Spirit and Boeing employees, according to its website. It is not affiliated with Spirit AeroSystems.

Former Wichita Congressman Mike Pompeo is poised  to be the next U.S. secretary of state.